Page 1 of 3
#1
Hi guys
im looking for a nice guitar, want it to be versitile, but mostly based around Metal playing. i want to know which one you could get more distortion out of, which has a faster neck, and things like that. PLEASE do not post if you are one of these people who has not tried both schecter and ibanez guitars, yet still says that schecter or ibanez owns all.
cheers
#2
Schecter... but the guitar doesn't give distortion, the amp does.
Amp?
Current guitar?
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#3
i know the guitar doesnt make distortion bt the pickups matter when it comes to distortion dont they?
and im currently using a gibson les paul studio faded. i really like it bt its not exactly suited to the metal styles so im looking for something quality but affordable with good fret acess, fast neck, low action etc.
#4
I'm not all that familiar with that model of ibanez but the Hellraiser's got some nice EMG pickups, and though it's breaking the rules I'd say the Hellraiser would be better suited to heavy effects.

What I didn't get was what you said about a faster neck - Unless you've got a shorter neck then you're unlikely to find one that's faster to use, as it all comes down to the players ability.
Gear;
- B.C. Rich Warbeast Bloodbound
- B.C. Rich NT Zombie 5-String Bass
- BOSS GT-10 Multi Effects TANK!
...In other words, I'm taking a giant dump on fender owners who use pods.
#5
ok, thanks. in your experience, would you say that, in general Ibanez is the batter make?
#6
Get the Schecter. I think that ibanez has an Edge III which is really bad. The Hellraiser also has better looks imo and it has EMG's with a push-pull split single coil thingy.
#7
thanks forok, this schecter is really starting to sound great are there ways that the Ibanez (or ANY guitar similarly priced in the Ibanez range) is better?
#8
opps soz made a typo i meant thanks for all the fast replies. this schecter is really starting to sound great are there ways that the Ibanez (or ANY guitar similarly priced in the Ibanez range) is better?
#10
Amp. Now. Don't even THINK about a new guitar, just get a nice amp... For $850+ there are a lot of nice amps.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#11
i've got that ibanez, but the fixed bridge version, personally i like it a lot, it doesn't have a push pull coil but the selector has coil tap in the 2nd and 4th position.
also, i don't know about the C-1 but the ibanez has a neck-thru, which is quite interesting. I love my ibanez, even though i don't play metal. I get great distortion and cleans with it, although the bridge pickup's cleans sound kind of sterile.
#14
Thru Neck or Neck Through, means the neck contruction is all the way through the guitar's body. Most of the time the body consists of 2 parts(wings) that are glued to each side.
It's known that Neck thru has a better sustain.
I have a Schecter C classic, love it, it's a neck thru, can't remember if the hellraiser is neck thru or not....

If these are the only 2 guitars you're looking at, get the Schecter. The pickups will be more suitable for heavier music. The shecter's neck will be slighly thicker or chunkier comparing to the RGT, but it's all about personal preference. You'll have to play long enough to find what you like.
Whether a neck is "Fast" is all subjective, but usually when they say "fast", I get it as it's "thinner"...
#15
ok, thanks for all the help...i have heared that the strings on the C-1 are fairly tight, meaning that bends are harder and they hurt more. is that true?
#16
Quote by alexec947
ok, thanks for all the help...i have heared that the strings on the C-1 are fairly tight, meaning that bends are harder and they hurt more. is that true?

Well... if you're getting a FR then yes because they're locked down giving them more tension. On the plus side, when you play a guitar that doesn't have a FR, you'll be a little more faster and stronger I think because you've worked harder on the other one.
#17
Yes they are. I believe they came with a higher gauge strings.

For mine, I switched to 10's, which is lighter. But I leave the lower 3 strings at the higher gauge. I just prefer it that way.

I've had Iban S520, Epi LP, Strats...but the C classic is my first choice when jamming with my band, cause it somehow cuts through the mix the best. At least for me.

Edit: wait, you said the C1...not sure about the string gauge on the C1, but my case is the C classic.
Last edited by ridesolo at Feb 13, 2009,
#18
ok, thanks.....will that tightness thing be the same with all double-locking trems? and will simply putting on gauge 9 or 10 strings solve the problem?
#19
Ibanez every time....

I had a hellraiser and sold it within 2 months of purchase

It's a decent guitar but it doesn't warrant all the jizz produced by the 16 year olds on here who can't afford anything better.
Ibanez PGM301 signed by Paul Gilbert
Ibanez PGM 500
Ibanez Fireman custom
Saving for a GH100L/VH100R
Orange PPC212 2X12
Last edited by sharpant at Feb 13, 2009,
#20
ok....do you have any good reasons why you like the Ibanez better? and im not really wanting to go any higher priced here....so if theres a similar priced ibanez that can beat it, id be intrested to know about it
#21
Quote by ridesolo
Thru Neck or Neck Through, means the neck contruction is all the way through the guitar's body. Most of the time the body consists of 2 parts(wings) that are glued to each side.
It's known that Neck thru has a better sustain.
I have a Schecter C classic, love it, it's a neck thru, can't remember if the hellraiser is neck thru or not....

If these are the only 2 guitars you're looking at, get the Schecter. The pickups will be more suitable for heavier music. The shecter's neck will be slighly thicker or chunkier comparing to the RGT, but it's all about personal preference. You'll have to play long enough to find what you like.
Whether a neck is "Fast" is all subjective, but usually when they say "fast", I get it as it's "thinner"...

Um, it actually has the LEAST strangely enough. Bolt on necks (when done RIGHT) are the best.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#22
Quote by oneblackened
Um, it actually has the LEAST strangely enough. Bolt on necks (when done RIGHT) are the best.


Really? Well, at least from what I've heard most, plus my own experience, generally I still think neck thru(especially hard tail) sustains massively, compares to bolt on...but then again, if you compare with those high end RG prestige with bolt on necks, which should have great sustain too.

Bolt on necks seem to have a quicker and more direct pick attack response, but these little things are very subtle. Not sure if this is just me...
#25
Quote by ridesolo
Really? Well, at least from what I've heard most, plus my own experience, generally I still think neck thru(especially hard tail) sustains massively, compares to bolt on...but then again, if you compare with those high end RG prestige with bolt on necks, which should have great sustain too.

Bolt on necks seem to have a quicker and more direct pick attack response, but these little things are very subtle. Not sure if this is just me...


A good neck-thru is pretty much the same as a good bolt on, it's just another way for the guitar brands to sell more neck-thru guitars, for example Steve Vai uses bolt-on guitars and his sustain is massive.
Guitars

- Epiphone Les Paul Standard Ebony Finish
- Hohner Hc-06 Classical guitar

Amplifiers

-Roland Cube 30x
Effects
- Vox Wah-wah
#27
Neck-thru or Set-thru. Both will give you enough spaces for the highest frets. Sustain will be mostly the same since they're both having floating bridge anyway. Most people will bash the Edge III bridge and suggest you go for the OFR on the Schecter. I say don't put your focus on just the bridge unit. Staying in tune or not, it's all about the quality of set-up you give it.

The biggest different between the two guitar gotta be at the neck. Ibanez has much thinner neck than Schecter and it can be the deciding factor if you have small or large hand.

Here's the spec I got from Schecter support for the C-1 hellraiser FR
Model
Width@ nut 42mm
Width@12th 52.7mm
Thickness@1st 21mm
Thickness@12th 22.5mm
Radius 13.8" ~ 350mm
Profile Thin-U

And here's the Ibanez RGT42DXFM directly from their website
Width at Nut 43mm
Width Last Fret 56mm
Thickness 1st Fret 19mm
Thickness 12th Fret 21mm
Radius 400mm
G͔͓̅e͎͉̟̽ͬ͐̎̃͐ͨͅå͈͖͕̹̤̟̐̏͋ͅr̩͕̫̰̗s̹̳̼ͥ̒̍̄̅ͥ̚:


ESP Standard Eclipse I CTM VW
ESP LTD Deluxe H-1001
ESP LTD Deluxe Viper-1000 STBC
ESP Edwards E-EX-100STD
Warmoth Paulcaster "Tiger"
Tanglewood TW170 AS
Vox Tonelab ST
Blackstar HT-1R


Last edited by hminh87 at Feb 13, 2009,
#28
ok, thanks for going to all the trouble of looking them up what can happen if a large-handed player uses a thinner neck? and vice-versa?
#29
ok, that was a stupid question.....heres something better (i hope lol). what are the advantages of having the thinner neck? does it make soloing/sweeping easier or something?
#30
Quote by alexec947
ok, that was a stupid question.....heres something better (i hope lol). what are the advantages of having the thinner neck? does it make soloing/sweeping easier or something?


Some people like it and some not, I prefer a thinner neck like a Jackson Soloist or a Ibanez Wizard neck for lead playing, but for rhythm I prefer a thicker neck, saving up for a more lead-friendly guitar at the moment .
Guitars

- Epiphone Les Paul Standard Ebony Finish
- Hohner Hc-06 Classical guitar

Amplifiers

-Roland Cube 30x
Effects
- Vox Wah-wah
#31
ok, thanks ppl why is it that, in general, you all seem to be saying that the Floyd Rose is better than the Edge Pro III?
#32
Well the Edge Pro is different from the Edge 3. But yes, an OFR is better than an edge 3. I dont know the quality on schecter's LFRs though.


The edge 3 is made of cheaper, mixed metals which wear out faster and cause it to lose stability.
#33
I own an Ibanez RGT42 and it's fantastic. To rectify a couple of common mistakes regarding this model:

1) It has a mahogany body, not basswood
2) It has an Edge Pro II bridge, NOT an Edge III

I've also played a Schecter Hellraiser so there is some form of comparison available.

The Schecter was a nice guitar and has better stock pups than the Ibanez but it still wasn't for me because the Ibanez was superior in so many other ways. The neck-thru is amazing to play, partly due to the sustain available but mostly because of the incredible access to the upper frets. I also found the Schecter neck too chunky compared to the super slim and fast Ibanez neck. Ultimately, I felt it was a better bet to get the Ibanez and upgrade the pups and coil tap them rather than get the better pups with the Schecter but be stuck with a guitar I thought was worse in every other way.

That's my experience only and it's very personal but you did ask for opinions.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#34
Quote by Doadman
I own an Ibanez RGT42 and it's fantastic. To rectify a couple of common mistakes regarding this model:

1) It has a mahogany body, not basswood
2) It has an Edge Pro II bridge, NOT an Edge III

Taken from GC's site:
Quote by Guitar Center.com
The Ibanez RGR42DXFM Electric Guitar has a mahogany body and gorgeous flamed maple top. Featuring a flat, fast 5-piece maple/walnut neck and an Edge III tremolo bridge, this RG sounds great whether you're crunching a heavy chord progression or divebombing your way through a killer solo.

So a couple problems with what you said..

1) I'm pretty sure an "Edge pro 2" doesn't even exist yet
2) It has an edge 3 anyways
#35
ok, then how much would it be to upgrade to and coil tap some new pups comparable to those of the Schecter? Also, is the OFR still better than the Edge Pro II bridge (assuming it does exist and does actually have one)?
#36
http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=66783

OK, there's a link to an RGT42 that shows it with the Edge Pro II bridge. They no longer list this model at the Ibanez website but when it was, I assure you it was listed as having an Edge Pro II because I investigated the guitar quite a bit before I bought mine. Furthermore, the Edge III hadn't been introduced when I bought my RGT42 so it couldn't have had an Edge III and the RGT42 certainly wasn't the only guitar in the range to use the Edge Pro II so it has certainly been introduced. Here are a couple of other models with an Edge Pro II just in case anyone still thinks they don't exist:

http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=1162
http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/options.php?id=70537

As for which is better between an OFR and EPII, that can be a little problematic. Most people will tell you that the OFR is the superior trem system yet my last guitar had an OFR yet I prefer the EPII. Sometimes it's just down to what you happen to prefer.

Coil tapping my pups cost very little indeed so I wouldn't worry about that at all. When I upgraded the pups in my guitar I went for Bare Knuckle because they seemed to be the best that I could buy so I spent £200 on them but people like Seymour Duncan do some excellent pickups for a lot less. I think a set of Seymour Duncans would have cost me about £130. I think from memory the fitting cost about £40. Changing the pickups certainly made a difference to the tone of the guitar and I liked doing it that way because then I could select the pickups that were exactly what I wanted. However, I'd view the pickups as a luxury that you can upgrade at your leisure. More of a priority is to get a guitar that feels fundamentally 'right' and a really good amp.
Gibson Les Paul Studio with Catswhiskers pickups
PRS SE 'Floyd' Custom 24 with Creamery pickups
Fender Standard Stratocaster with DiMarzio pickups
Takamine GN30
BluGuitar AMP1
#37
I'd go for the Ibanez. Great guitar for metal. I've played both and I'd rather have the Ibanez. Unless you play on abusing the trem...the Edge III isn't the best floating trem out there.
#38
right.....well, i dont really have the money to upgrade the pups, but i will remember what you said about finding the "right" guitar and ill think about that some more. are there any particular reasons why you like the Edge Pro II better, or does that also just feel fundamentally "right"?
#39
Out of these two, I'd take the Hellraiser. They're the most reliable guitars I've ever come across, and for your selected genre... it'd be a great match.

The Ibanez is good too, although I don't trust the trem on it. Out of the two, I'd lean towards the Hellraiser.
#40
my last question was directed to Doadman, not Eyebanez333. Eyebanez333, what points about the Ibanez make it the better metal guitar?
Page 1 of 3