#1
Righty, so it's 0221 and I've just had a rare twang of creative genius (relatively speaking, of course). I'm a bassist at heart, with an influence of drums and bit of guitar. I started guitar first, but basically sucked at that and went to bass, so I have no knowledge of writing guitar based melodies because I'm an idiot and played root notes with the odd fill thrown in there without knowing what it means.

I'm writing a song in D major (D, E, F sharp, A, B, C Sharp) and obviously it's just boring with chords. I'm a guitarist but it sounds better on piano, at the moment it's just basically being tabbed onto guitar pro. I do have a basic grasp of chords though, so I'm not completely screwed...

How would I go about writing a melody to go over the top of it? I have a basic idea of scales, but that's as far as it goes. I don't know anything about modes, or anything like that.

Chord wise I've got:
A Major
ex
B5
G6
D7
A
E

G Major
e
D3
G4
D5
A
E

D Major
e5
D7
G7
D
A
E

Dsus4
e5
D8
G7
D
A
E

And A Sharp
e1
D3
G3
D
A
E

This is just a basic idea, but how would I go about putting a melody over chords like that?

Thanks...
Posted from Ubuntu.

Squier Precision Bass Special in Antique Burst (LH)
Rotosound Swing 66s, 45-105

On slapping on a bass:
Quote by supersac
pretend its a woman
i have no helpful advice

Last edited by druggietoad2k5 at Feb 12, 2009,
#2
1. We're not going to write your music for you, though you don't seem to be asking us to.
2. You must accept that everything from songwriting to basketball to calculus is difficult before it is easy and you will be terrible before you are good, but that is okay and everyone goes through that; their admission of that fact is not always so easy to get, though.
3. The notes in a D major scale are D E F# G A B C#. You forgot the G note.
4. Call that A# chord Bb. You're almost always going to call it Bb rather than A# and Bb is likely correct in this scenario depending on a bit of context.

With that in mind...

It will help us if you post the chord progression rather than just the chords. However, the best option here is probably to sing something over the chords. It doesn't matter if you're a good singer (voice-wise) as long as you can hit the notes you want. Once you find some singing melodies you like, figure them out on your guitar and write them in GP, which should put the lick in standard notation for you. Once you have those basic licks, start adding some frills by playing the licks on your guitar and making some modifications. Repeat this process until you find some good melodies.

When you find someone to play the piano for you or learn to play the piano yourself, whoever is playing the piano is extremely likely to add in some "spice." Sheet music is more of a "this is the jist" rather than "play this, damn it."
#3
No one can really tell you how to write a good melody. You kind of just have to hear it in your head. But melodies generally focus on chord tones with some passing tones in between.
#4
Hmm D major is awfully close to E melodic minor
D Maj D E F#G A B C#
E MM E F#G A B C# D#
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#6
Quote by theocao
Hmm D major is awfully close to E melodic minor
D Maj D E F#G A B C#
E MM E F#G A B C# D#



Not really.... well definitely not.

E is a whole tone up from D, they might share mostly similar notes but it wouldn't work. I know enough about scales to know that this wouldn't work.

I guess I should just stick at it. What I have so far sounds alright-ish. Obviously it'll be cleaned up etc and it will be improved.
Posted from Ubuntu.

Squier Precision Bass Special in Antique Burst (LH)
Rotosound Swing 66s, 45-105

On slapping on a bass:
Quote by supersac
pretend its a woman
i have no helpful advice