#1
I know I have made a thread on this, but due to how long has passed and the lack of progress I'm making, I'm going to start this again.

Now, I am spending ALOT of time on ear training. I have been doing major thirds, fifths and octaves for a month or so now, just because I want my ear to be the best it can possibly be.

The problem. When there is a static bass note, and these three intervals, I get 100% or very close. But when there is a non-static bass note, I get around 50-60%.

Should I continue with the static or move to non-static, or devide my time evenly between both.

Any help is greatly appreciated.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#2
Quote by The_Sophist
I have been doing major thirds, fifths and octaves


You need to be able to get more than just those. What do you use to practice? www.musictheory.net has a good ear trainer if you need one.
#3
That and good-ear.com

That is the one with moving bass note that screws me up. I eventually want to be able to destinguish any interval by ear, but I'm starting with the very basics.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#4
Well I dont play like you. I play BY EAR! I picked up the guitar about 4 years ago and now I am really good, but I started by just like listening to stuff and spending hours on end trying to playthem. I learned The Godfathe Theme as my ver first song! I still play it live! But yeah man I can really say to train your ear. FORGET THE THEORY BEHIND IT!!!! Guitar is not a process. It is an expressive instrument. Think Yngwie or other shredders. All Mathmeticians. Writing out solos and stuff... The REAL GUITAR PLAYERS ae self-taught guys like Slash (#1 EVER PERIOD), and Zakk Wylde, and Marty Friedman(ex-Lead for Megadeth), and of course everyone knows Dave Mustaine!
"Nice boys don't play rock n' roll" - Axl Rose in (Nice Boys cover)
#5
Instead of just annalysing intervals, try sight singing simple melodic lines and then check with a piano. You may find solfege useful as well. websites such as teoria.com have good ear training exercises, but SING SING SING. it will help
Blindfold her telling her that she is going to get a surprise, then proceed to take off your pants and stick your penis in her nostrils.
#6
Go with a non-static lower note (or higher: don't neglect descending melodic intervals) - you want to be able to pick them out in any instance. Alternate between playing them harmonically and melodically.

Keep practicing and they'll get better. I found that it helps a lot to work on your singing: Practice singing solfege up and down the scale, with an instrument to help at first, and singing the intervals between degrees, and arpeggios, melodies, everything you can find. Singing and hearing are two pieces of one. Might as well sing what you're practicing while you practice it too.
#7
Quote by What_is_my_name
FORGET THE THEORY BEHIND IT!!!!

Never say that in this forum ... or anywhere else.

Being able to identify intervals and knowing how to play those intervals makes it even easier to play songs by ear.
#8
Quote by What_is_my_name
Well I dont play like you. I play BY EAR! I picked up the guitar about 4 years ago and now I am really good, but I started by just like listening to stuff and spending hours on end trying to playthem. I learned The Godfathe Theme as my ver first song! I still play it live! But yeah man I can really say to train your ear. FORGET THE THEORY BEHIND IT!!!! Guitar is not a process. It is an expressive instrument. Think Yngwie or other shredders. All Mathmeticians. Writing out solos and stuff... The REAL GUITAR PLAYERS ae self-taught guys like Slash (#1 EVER PERIOD), and Zakk Wylde, and Marty Friedman(ex-Lead for Megadeth), and of course everyone knows Dave Mustaine!


That is the dumbest thing I have ever heard. Theory and a good ear help you create what you hear in your head.

Just think if you knew what you wanted to say in a different language but didn't know how to speak the language. You wouldn't be able to communicate would you?

And you lost all clout when you say Slash is the #1 ever period and bring Zakk Wylde into the conversation.

What about guys like Greg Howe, Brett Garsed, and Paul Gilbert? Extremely skilled and interesting players with great grasps of theory.

By the way marty friedman knows lots of theory. Just watch this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I0GzHt3yScM

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