#1
I've noticed several country and bluegrass songs do this. Say you're starting in the key of G major. Now the song is preparing to go to the IV chord. Instead of going to G7 (G-B-D-F#), they go to GMm7 (G-B-D-F). Now I know F natural is not diatonic to the G major scale, so is this chord being used as a secondary dominant key, to lead into the IV chord, aka, C?
#2
First of all, G7 and GMm7 refer to the same thing (1-3-5-b7).
Assuming the song is actually in G major, it would seem that G7 is indeed being used to lead into the IV chord. Keep in mind that just because a song starts with a G major chord doesn't mean that the song is in G major.
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#3
I know all about telling what chord a song starts in and then determining what key it is actualy "in" being that they can be different. That wasn't my confusion. It was definitely in G major. It always resolved back to G major, and the chords used further reinforced that it was indeed G major.

And I meant to type GM7 to get my point across that it wasn't the traditional G-B-D-F# that was diatonic to the scale.
Last edited by Axe720 at Feb 13, 2009,
#4
If it's in G major, then yes, the G7 is a secondary dominant of IV.
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#6
You very rarely ever see a dominant 7 on the tonic. When you do it's almost definitely the V7/IV.
#7
Quote by sonixon
You very rarely ever see a dominant 7 on the tonic. When you do it's almost definitely the V7/IV.


Not in this case. And plus, this wasn't a technically a "dominant 7" because G wasn't the dominant chord, it was the tonic chord. The progression was G (then to G7) - C - G - Am - D7 - G. Then the lead into the chorus was G - C - G - D7. But I guess because it was a secondary dominant, you COULD call it a dominant 7th.