#1
I mean I know that pitch is created by differing frequencies but even the same note on different intstruments will sound different, for example a flute vs. distorted guitar. Is their a feasable scientific explanation to this?
Quote by icaneatcatfood
On second thought, **** tuning forks. You best be carrying around a grand piano that was tuned by an Italian
#5
Harmonic Content.
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe Reissue -> Korg Pitchblack Tuner -> Boss PS-5 -> EHX Big Muff -> MXR EVH Phase 90 -> Menatone Pleasure Trem 5000 -> Line 6 Verbzilla -> MXR Carbon Copy -> Boss RC-2 -> Peavey Classic 50
#6
from a pure physics standpoint, timbre is is the amount of audible overtones and how loud they are compared to each other and the fundamental.

Another thing that drastically changes the sound is the attack and decay of the notes (how fast it takes the note to go from silent to full volume and vice versa)
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#7
guitar is like the pinnacle of timbre .

Seriously the how many timbre's there exists is sick. As far as how hard you hit the string, and how many harmonic content you add (pinch harmonic, semi harmonic).

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
#8
At a very appreciable, basic level you can look at the difference between a sine and squaretooth wave. You can literally see the difference.
#9
Quote by SchadenFreude


this phrase is just gold, "the psychoacoustician's multidimensional wastebasket category".




But thanks anyway for the replies...the reason I asked here is that I couldn't understand the wikipedia articles
Quote by icaneatcatfood
On second thought, **** tuning forks. You best be carrying around a grand piano that was tuned by an Italian
#10
Quote by Roast Beef
At a very appreciable, basic level you can look at the difference between a sine and squaretooth wave. You can literally see the difference.

There is no such thing as a squaretooth wave, you must've meant sawtooth or square. But yes, Timbre is based on the harmonic content of the instrument. That's why Stradivarius Violins are so great, they've been crafted to produce near perfect overtones.
Quote by allislost
I would say that aetherspear speaks nothing but the truth.
UG Blues Group
UG Reggae & Dub Group
Need Professional Mixing for cheap? Need Vinyl to Digital Transfers? PM Me.
#11
AFAIK, it is mostly a function of the materials that are vibrating - what they are made from, how they are constructed, and how they are designed to resonate. How's that for sweepingly huge?

Compound that with the same variables of whatever materials are used to set the vibrating material in motion... whether it be a drum mallet, guitar pick, violin bow, breath support into a mouthpiece, thickness of the reed, etc.

Multiply those many variables together, and you've got some idea.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by aetherspear
There is no such thing as a squaretooth wave, you must've meant sawtooth or square. But yes, Timbre is based on the harmonic content of the instrument. That's why Stradivarius Violins are so great, they've been crafted to produce near perfect overtones.


Correct, I meant square. But come on, it looks like square teeth.

Also: Overtones don't play a huge role in timbre
#13
Quote by Roast Beef

Also: Overtones don't play a huge role in timbre


Yes they do, overtones and the volume envelope are generally considered to be the main components.
make Industrial and/or experimental electronic music? Join my group!

Last.fm
#14
Man, after reading all these, I was way off. I was going to say a chainsaw.


just kidding. You know what they say; there's one in every crowd.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#15
Quote by Roast Beef

Also: Overtones don't play a huge role in timbre

They absolutely do.
Quote by allislost
I would say that aetherspear speaks nothing but the truth.
UG Blues Group
UG Reggae & Dub Group
Need Professional Mixing for cheap? Need Vinyl to Digital Transfers? PM Me.
#17
From wikipedia:

The richness of a sound or note produced by a musical instrument is sometimes described in terms of a sum of a number of distinct frequencies. The lowest frequency is called the fundamental frequency and the pitch it produces is used to name the note. For example, in western music, instruments are normally tuned to A = 440 Hz. Other significant frequencies are called overtones of the fundamental frequency, which may include harmonics and partials.

what are you talking about?
As was already said, Envelope and overtones makes timbre.
Quote by allislost
I would say that aetherspear speaks nothing but the truth.
UG Blues Group
UG Reggae & Dub Group
Need Professional Mixing for cheap? Need Vinyl to Digital Transfers? PM Me.
#18
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
from a pure physics standpoint, timbre is is the amount of audible overtones and how loud they are compared to each other and the fundamental.

Another thing that drastically changes the sound is the attack and decay of the notes (how fast it takes the note to go from silent to full volume and vice versa)

+1

I believe the main way computers can generate sounds that sound like various different instruments is by changing the type, amount and volume of overtones.
#19
So a whole bunch of sine waves with different overtones will all sound incredibly different
#20
Yes, though a sine wave combined with an overtone is no longer a sine wave.

I have an old physics summary that I could upload with some nice (text book) graphs showing the relative strenghts of the harmonics with different instruments, though it's 1.5mb.

EDIT: I'll just upload it

EDIT: No I won't, it's far too big.
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
Last edited by Ænimus Prime at Feb 16, 2009,
#21
Quote by Kid_Thorazine
from a pure physics standpoint, timbre is is the amount of audible overtones and how loud they are compared to each other and the fundamental.

Another thing that drastically changes the sound is the attack and decay of the notes (how fast it takes the note to go from silent to full volume and vice versa)


I so wanted to come into this thread and actually give a answer to something I actually know that's not a stupid question....

if only I had been online 3 days ago... damn.


but I have a question now.


I only know what timbre is from a couple of books I've read and I little internet looking.

but would what guitarists call tone be the same thing as timbre? because I understand that it has to do with the overtones and attack and decay and a bunch of other stuff, but so does tone.

are tone and timbre the same thing, or just related?
#22
I would call say they're the same

This website makes a distinction:
http://users.chariot.net.au/~gmarts/picktimb.htm
My name is Andy
Quote by MudMartin
Only looking at music as math and theory, is like only looking at the love of your life as flesh and bone.

Swinging to the rhythm of the New World Order,
Counting bodies like sheep to the rhythm of the war drums
#23
I think the author is mistaken there, i read all his explanations and I disagree with him. it seems he defines timbre as being inherit quality of the guitar and the pickup placement, and tone as what you do to the EQ. to me that seems kinda stupid. seeing as guitarists and a lot of other musicians refer to both as tone.
#24
timbre = what makes 2 different things (that are making the same pitch, even) sound different. it's what lets you hear the difference between a saxophone and a trumpet. or some wailing vocals and a guitar.
#25
Quote by The4thHorsemen
I so wanted to come into this thread and actually give a answer to something I actually know that's not a stupid question....

if only I had been online 3 days ago... damn.


but I have a question now.


I only know what timbre is from a couple of books I've read and I little internet looking.

but would what guitarists call tone be the same thing as timbre? because I understand that it has to do with the overtones and attack and decay and a bunch of other stuff, but so does tone.

are tone and timbre the same thing, or just related?

I'd say they're the same, seeing as timbre is just the ways the same note can sound
different and the same applies for tone.