#1
i went to the guitar shop and played the guitars they had. none of them felt that much better than my current so im buying online. ive narrowed down to 4 yairi masterworks.

if anyone can explain some of the differences between the woods, id greatly appreciate it. im thinking ill end up with one of the last two. ill put in the links.


DYM85

DYM94

DYM95

DYM96


85 has
Back/Sides: Solid Kihada
Top: Solid Spruce

94 has
Back/Sides: Solid Mahogany
Top: Solid Spruce

95 has
Back/Sides Solid Rosewood
Top Solid Spruce

96 has
Back/Sides: Solid Ovangkol
Top: Solid Spruce - Distressed


im not sure what Kihada is like. does anyone know about that?

im thinking 95 over 94 because of the rosewood back/side should help the bass string sound really solid and long while the spruce gives it a good mix of low and high end.

and im not sure about the ovangkol and distressed spruce. does anyone know about these?

my budget can take either of these guitars, so that part isnt as much an issue.
#3
I can't tell you about Kihada either, buy I found this on lmii about Ovankol:

[B]Ovangkol
Ovangkol (also called Shedua and Amazaqoue) has been in use by several of the larger high-end factories for several years now, most notably Taylor, Lowden and Avalon, but its combination of affordability, beauty and tonality has made it a favorite with a growing number of hand makers as well.

From West Africa, the figure is similar to Indian Rosewood, with dark grey straight lines over a golden-brown or olive-brown background. It comes from the same family as Bubinga and has a similar interlocking grain pattern. It is reasonably easy to bend and plane and it finishes well.

Montreal luthier Michael Greenfield says:“Ovangkol...who knew?! What a great alternative tonewood. As there is a lot of it around, the logs are large and the sets are very on quarter and STRAIGHT. What a pleasure to build with. Bends and glues well....not too hard on edge tools. It is not quite as dense as most Rosewoods, which can be a good thing, especially on larger bodied guitars as you don’t have to combat the problem of clashing overtones -there is better separation between notes.” He went on to say that his latest Ovangkol guitar is a ”monster” and mentioned that tonally it falls nicely ”between Koa and Rosewood”.

I think the distressed spruce is just a finishing technique they use to make it look old. It shouldn't affect the tone in any major way.

Nice Guitars!!! Post pics when you get one!!!