#1
Why is C9 not C2? Same question for all the other chords with an added note above the octave

Probably a retarded question.
#2
cos its a note above the octave, which is 8, so one above is 9?

dunno
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#3
Quote by gabcd86
Why is C9 not C2? Same question for all the other chords with an added note above the octave

Probably a retarded question.


Because those notes are extensions added beyond the seventh. A C9 chord consists of a chord with a root note C and the intervals of a major third, perfect fifth, minor seventh, and major ninth. Calling it C2 wouldn't make any sense.
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#4
I've wondered that as well. I guess because you don't really ever play the 2 in the same octave as the root, you play it an octave above.

EDIT: Disregard what I said. This:
Quote by Archeo Avis
Because those notes are extensions added beyond the seventh. A C9 chord consists of a chord with a root note C and the intervals of a major third, perfect fifth, minor seventh, and major ninth. Calling it C2 wouldn't make any sense.
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Last edited by food1010 at Feb 13, 2009,
#5
Quote by gabcd86
Why is C9 not C2? Same question for all the other chords with an added note above the octave

Probably a retarded question.


My interpretation is that if the third is there, you usually want the added 2nd in a different octave to avoid it clashing with that third, and calling it a 9 signifies that.

If the third isn't there, it's called a suspended 2nd, or sus2 chord.

Same thing with other extended chords you're talking about, really.
For instance, if you play an 11th chord, you're adding a 4th in a different octave than the third, if you leave out the third - it's a suspended 4th or sus4.