#1
If you are playing in, say, the key of E. The chord progression is E A D E. How does the lead guitarist know what to lead with, along the rhythm guitarist? We practiced, swapping rhythm and lead, lead being in E Blues. It didn't really... go together.

How is lead to be played with rhythm? In the key/scale? A flat? Sharp? Octave up?

Thanks.
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#2
That's more likely the key of A. A major, Bm, Cm, Dmaj, Emaj.The lead player plays the scale associated with the rhythm chords basically.
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Feb 13, 2009,
#3
change scales on each chord change......play notes of the chords the rhythm guitarist is playing.....for instance on the change to A play an A, C#, E, G or even a C to give you the bluesy clash of minor against major
#4
Try playin in E major pentatonic (smae boxes as C#m pentatonic, except resting on the e note instead of the C#). You mihgt find that a happier sounding lead will work better over that progression,
#5
So if the chord is Cmaj, play a C scale, if the chord is D play a D scale and so on?

How does one know which scale to play? Pentatonic Major, Pentatonic Minor, Blues, Mixolidian, atc.
Right Leaning Centrist with Socialist Tendencies
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#6
Umm E minor pentatonic will work.

|--------------------------------0-3-|
|--------------------------0-3-------|
|-------------------0-2--------------|
|-------------0-2--------------------|
|------0-2---------------------------|
|0-3---------------------------------|

and E blues

|------------------------------------0-3-|
|------------------------------0-3-------|
|---------------------0-2-3-------------|
|---------------0-2----------------------|
|------0-1-2----------------------------|
|0-3------------------------------------|


Obviously that can be transcribed to a higher octaqve beginning with the twelth fret, but the minor pentatonic and blues scales can be used for improvisation with any song. You just need to find the right key.

Also, once you get the scale down try finding notes outside of the sclae to increase the depth and diversity of your solos.
#7
Also, finding the root note in which you song is played, helps identify which key to play the lead in. Changing scales to follow the chord change rarely works out good; most often the lead changes keys mid-solo to follow a key-change in the chord progression, not to follow the actual progression.
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#8
Quote by -Wolverine-
So if the chord is Cmaj, play a C scale, if the chord is D play a D scale and so on?

How does one know which scale to play? Pentatonic Major, Pentatonic Minor, Blues, Mixolidian, atc.


.
Not necessarily. You have to look at the progression as a whole.

You choose the type of scale depending on the sound you want. Major with major keys and minor with minor keys of course. But the different modes are more personal preference even though they still have rules.
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American Standard Strat
Taylor 712
#9
Generally you look at the progression and establish the key first. That is the context for EVERYTHING. Then you examine chords. Depending on the chord changes, the solo might need nothing more than using a single scale based on the key. Sometimes, certain chords call out for particular emphasis, sometimes not. When a chord contains notes not entirely in key, pay attention to those notes. If you anticipate them or hit them right on the 1st beat, or the downbeats, it'll really sound like you "know what you're doing", but it's also a good idea to also know where all your chord tones are and incorporate it into your solos.

That's just the general gist without throwing a lot of theory in. For the most part, when confronted with a typical progression, I'm working just a single scale through most of the solo. That's first principle. Second, watching for chord tones. Third, perhaps mixing in some other scales where appropriate. Fourth, is just taking a strong line wherever it goes and making sure it wraps up on a strong harmony note.
#10
Does the "style" of the solo depend on the chords? Or can a rockish solo be played with the same chords are a blues solo?
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#11
Same to an extent, its really a phrasing thing.
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#12
you could go backwards? Write a solo and have your rhythm play to it?

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