#1
well my friend stuffed up all the tuning on my guitar and i ended up with my a string tuned to a f# as well as my d string an octave up from that f# and i managed to write a riff i liked using that tuning.

anyway i didn't like the extra strain on my d string so i played around with the tuning and my guitar is now tuned as (from high to low) d#5, a#4, f#4, d#4, f#3, D#3. i checked on Tuxguitar in the chord finder and as all open strings make a d#m chord this would make me be in open d# minor tuning, correct?

other than making it super easy to play my riff are there any other advantages to playing in this tuning? and if i raise my f# to G will it make it d# minor?


TL;DR: d#5, a#4, f#4, d#4, f#3, D#3 what can i do with it?

and i wanna call it zephyr tuning

EDIT: come on 78 views and not one reply?can someone at least confirm i'm right with the assumption its d#minor tuning?
Last edited by texzephyr at Feb 14, 2009,
#4
Quote by michal23
Yes, that's d#m and you can do anything you want with it...

okay thanks... and i should rephrase that, what are its advantages over standard?
#5
Open tunings are commonly used for slide guitar.

I use them as I find they help my creativity. I don't know the notes of the fretboard in an open tuning, so I'm forced to write entirely by ear. Also, the way the guitar sounds is different... it sounds richer, deeper, warmer, fuller - to me, anyway.
#6
Edit: ^^^ The notes are the same, you just have a different starting note.

That's D# Minor alright, if you changed the F#'s to G#'s then I believe it would be D#sus4.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
Last edited by TheGallowsPole at Feb 14, 2009,
#7
Noooooooooooo!!!!! Let me kill this before it spreads.

You can't tune down to a sharp note. That is Eb.

Yes, people say they tune down to C#, but that's not correct. It's the term, though, so I have no chance of changing that.
#8
I don't really see how that applies to open tunings, I fully understand what you're saying about F# and Gb being enharmonic but having different names.

But that would mean that if you ever even wanted to write a song in Open D#minor, you'd have to first tune your guitar to Open D and tune up. I don't really think its worth arguing about.

And if I've totally misunderstood your point, I'm sorry.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#10
I understand that, I just really didn't see what you were referring to in your original post. Just seemed like you were kind of jumping in to say that you should use proper nomenclature.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#11
I think we need a whole thread dedicated solely to enharmonic notes.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#12
Quote by TheGallowsPole
Just seemed like you were kind of jumping in to say that you should use proper nomenclature.
That's exactly what I did, and you should use proper nomenclature; that is how musicians communicate.

And just because everyone will know what you mean by tuning down to D# doesn't mean that it is okay. I know what someone means when they say, "I not never gonna do that," but I don't think of said person as being well educated in spoken English.

Quote by food1010
I think we need a whole thread dedicated solely to enharmonic notes.
I think we really need to simplify the lessons on here. One word per thread sounds good to me.
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Noooooooooooo!!!!! Let me kill this before it spreads.

You can't tune down to a sharp note. That is Eb.

Yes, people say they tune down to C#, but that's not correct. It's the term, though, so I have no chance of changing that.


Okay sorry i get what you mean now. i tune from E down to Eb or from D up to D#, right?

And it's then drop Db not drop C# right?
or am i just getting all confuzzled?
#14
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Noooooooooooo!!!!! Let me kill this before it spreads.

You can't tune down to a sharp note. That is Eb.

Yes, people say they tune down to C#, but that's not correct. It's the term, though, so I have no chance of changing that.
Wait, why the hell not? Something like G#m is way easier to deal with than Abm. That's just as much D# as it is Eb on its own. I guess maybe if you're looking at it as E down to whatever instead of as its own tuning Eb might be more correct but otherwise...
Quote by texzephyr
Okay sorry i get what you mean now. i tune from E down to Eb or from D up to D#, right?
And then we have a case like this. A tuning goes by a different name because you came to it from a different starting point?
Last edited by grampastumpy at Feb 15, 2009,
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
That's exactly what I did, and you should use proper nomenclature; that is how musicians communicate.

And just because everyone will know what you mean by tuning down to D# doesn't mean that it is okay. I know what someone means when they say, "I not never gonna do that," but I don't think of said person as being well educated in spoken English.

I think we really need to simplify the lessons on here. One word per thread sounds good to me.


I agree, and I wasn't saying you were wrong. It just seemed a little harsh, but you are correct and in no way was I defending the use of improper terminology.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
There's no differene between writing in D# and writing in Eb. It is ridiculous to say, "I don't want to write in Eb; I would rather write in D#."


It sounds the same but on the off chance that you're transcribing anything to sheet music, there's a big difference
Quote by bangoodcharlote
^Owned.

I suggest not screwing with the UGer with the best name on the site.


Quote by Albino_Rhino
I don't see how prostitution is going to help out your string buzz...
#17
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Noooooooooooo!!!!! Let me kill this before it spreads.

You can't tune down to a sharp note. That is Eb.

Yes, people say they tune down to C#, but that's not correct. It's the term, though, so I have no chance of changing that.

Why not?

I've tried to think of reasons but I just can't come up with any logical ones, please enlighten me.
#18
Quote by 12345abcd3
Why not?

I've tried to think of reasons but I just can't come up with any logical ones, please enlighten me.


there are 2 reasons:

Reason #1: Because it's the officially accepted way to describe tuning of strings in music theory. If there are no rules in nomenclature, then the system breaks down. Simple as that.

Reason #2: Physics and logic state that if you are LOWERING the pitch of something, you are making it FLAT. If you are RAISING the pitch of something, you are making it SHARP. Less string tension = describe resulting note as "flat." more string tension = describe resulting note as "sharp." This is assuming you tune to an accidental, and not to a whole note, of course. Since we always speak of tunings in relation to standard E tuning, going to the tuning he's described would be regraded as tuning to open Eb.
Last edited by frigginjerk at Feb 16, 2009,
#19
Quote by frigginjerk
there are 2 reasons:

Reason #1: Because it's the officially accepted way to describe tuning of strings in music theory. If there are no rules in nomenclature, then the system breaks down. Simple as that.

Ok I get it, that's just the accepted rule, right?

Quote by frigginjerk
Reason #2: Physics and logic state that if you are LOWERING the pitch of something, you are making it FLAT. If you are RAISING the pitch of something, you are making it SHARP. Less string tension = describe resulting note as "flat." more string tension = describe resulting note as "sharp." This is assuming you tune to an accidental, and not to a whole note, of course. Since we always speak of tunings in relation to standard E tuning, going to the tuning he's described would be regraded as tuning to open Eb.

The reasoning seems a little flawed because D# is lower than E and the terms flat and sharp are used to describe the relationship between the note and the letter used. Therefore you can go down to a D# or up to an Eb.

If you played an E on the A string then lowered it a semitone would you then say that you would be playing an Eb and not a D# just because you had lowered it? And if you moved up from D would you call it a D# not an Eb?

Anyway, if is the the accepted rule I'll accept it, I just thought that resoning was a bit off.
#20
Quote by 12345abcd3
Ok I get it, that's just the accepted rule, right?


The reasoning seems a little flawed because D# is lower than E and the terms flat and sharp are used to describe the relationship between the note and the letter used. Therefore you can go down to a D# or up to an Eb.

If you played an E on the A string then lowered it a semitone would you then say that you would be playing an Eb and not a D# just because you had lowered it? And if you moved up from D would you call it a D# not an Eb?

Anyway, if is the the accepted rule I'll accept it, I just thought that resoning was a bit off.


it's not a question of what notes you are playing, it's a question of physically tuning the string.

your guitar is set up at the shop to be at "standard" string tension, which gives you your usual six strings, tuned to e b g d a E.

any tuning in which the majority of the re-tuned strings become looser would be correctly described as a flat tuning. any tuning where the majority of the re-tuned strings become tighter would be described as a sharp tuning.

as has been stated, this rule has already been lost in popular terminology, because so many people refer to Db standard as C#, and it caught on.

all i'm talking about in reason #2 there is tension. if your string is below standard tension it's flat, above standard tension it's sharp. so it's not that physics names your notes for you... theory is what names the notes. physics just describes what is happening to the overall tuning of the guitar.
Last edited by frigginjerk at Feb 16, 2009,
#21
Quote by frigginjerk
it's not a question of what notes you are playing, it's a question of physically tuning the string.

your guitar is set up at the shop to be at "standard" string tension, which gives you your usual six strings, tuned to e b g d a E.

any tuning in which the majority of the re-tuned strings become looser would be correctly described as a flat tuning. any tuning where the majority of the re-tuned strings become tighter would be described as a sharp tuning.

as has been stated, this rule has already been lost in popular terminology, because so many people refer to Db standard as C#, and it caught on.

all i'm talking about in reason #2 there is tension. if your string is below standard tension it's flat, above standard tension it's sharp. so it's not that physics names your notes for you... theory is what names the notes. physics just describes what is happening to the overall tuning of the guitar.

I understand that when you make a string looser you are making it flatter but what I was saying is that the flat/sharpness of the string is independent to the sharp/flat in a note name.

The sharp/flat in a note name is just describing its relationship to the letter written, so just because the string is flatter, there is no reason why it couldn't be represented as a sharp letter. The convention may be that it should be represented with a flat letter but there is no real logical reason for it.
#22
Quote by 12345abcd3
The sharp/flat in a note name is just describing its relationship to the letter written, so just because the string is flatter, there is no reason why it couldn't be represented as a sharp letter.
No, theory doesn't work that way. When you move chromatically, that is, with no clear scale in mind, you move up to a sharp tone and down to a flat tone. It would be ridiculous to write A Bb B C Db D or A G# G F# F E D#, assuming the patterns are ascending and descending, respectively.
#23
Quote by texzephyr
and if i raise my f# to G will it make it d# minor?



I can't believe no one else saw this. it is already minor. if use raise the third to G it will be major.