#1
What does master volume do? Does it mean that you can crank your ammp for a good valve tone and have it on a low volume?
Please reply!!!
#2
Quote by familybucket
What does master volume do? Does it mean that you can crank your ammp for a good valve tone and have it on a low volume?
Please reply!!!


It depends on the amp man. Some amps don't really need a master volume. Some amps even have both post gain and master volume.
#3
Any control labelled "master" means it controls the whole circuit, as opposed to channel volume, which only controls volume on one channel (appropriately enough).

The Master Volume is usually the last knob in the circuit. It's basically like "the last word" on how loud your amp will be.
#6
Quote by sashki
Any control labelled "master" means it controls the whole circuit, as opposed to channel volume, which only controls volume on one channel (appropriately enough).

The Master Volume is usually the last knob in the circuit. It's basically like "the last word" on how loud your amp will be.


That's not always the case.
#7
my old laney also had a knob named "master volume" which controlled the loudness of the distorted channel...

the normal volume-knob was named only "volume"

but my marshall is exactyl the other way round.. so i think it depends on your stuff how things are called xD
#8
Quote by blind.quardian
Master of puppets im pulling your stringssss


It opens and closes the volume


I don't get it.

I suggest you look in the manual that came with your amp.
#9
note: this is solely based on my experience. it is in no way meant to be used as a reference or looked upon as 100% correct as it is largely opinion based.


master volume control in Solid State Amps
-controls the volume of the sound coming out of the speaker

-generally should not be used to alter the sound other than changing your volume

-does not neccessarily sound good when turned all the way up (in fact most of the time, it sounds bad.)

in conclusion, use the master volume to vary how loud you want the sound coming from the amp to be. do not rely on it to alter your tone or sound.


master volume control in tube amps
this is where my answer will vary. on some tube amps, you get an individual volume control for each channel (eg. distortion channel, clean channel). these individual volume controls generally control how hard you want to drive the tubes(eg. to get a saturated overdrive sound). this means that the master volume control will only control how loud you want the sound coming out of your speakers to be.

some tube amps have only one channel that only has a Volume control, Treble control, mid control and bass control. in this situation, the volume control will control both the extent to which you want to drive your tubes as well as the volume of the sound coming out of your speaker.
Last edited by daryle_goh at Feb 14, 2009,
#11
Quote by The_Bosstone
I don't get it.

I suggest you look in the manual that came with your amp.


There nothing funny just wanted to right it when i read MASTER volume thats all
#12
My Yale has Master, Volume and Gain and its single channel SS. It does give an interesting range of sounds.
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#13
if your amp has a regular volume and a master volume, try experimenting with them (try master at 4, regular at 0.5, regular at 10, master at 1, etc...) because the regular volume comes before the master volume and you can get some preamp saturation by turning it up while lowering the volume with the master. you do need to crank both of them if you want that real power tube saturation though
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#14
well, for the best Valve tone, the master volume does not do the amp justice.

a master volume is placed between the Preamp and power amp, so even though you crank your volume and gain, you still are not overdriving the power amp, what most guitarists say if the best type of OD. some guitarists do prefer a preamp heavy gain sound, where the majority of the dist if created by the preamp, though.

an Attenuator, such as a THD Hotplate or a Marshall Power brake, will give you a more just representation of your amp's tone at lower volume settings.
Quote by patriotplayer90
Lolz that guy is a noob.

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