#1
You can barely even hear any of the riffs, espeacially with more than one guitar.
BTW, I use a Mesa Boogie Mark III with a Marshall 1960A which sound amazing live.
Last edited by bulletrocks522 at Feb 14, 2009,
#2
youre either not mixing it properly, or youre not bringing in the audio loud enough
Quote by Doolittle
Do it for Hedwig!
#3
How are you positioning the SM57? even close up mic's can sound weak if not in a good spot.

Actually, i have a proposition for you, could you zip and upload the pro tools folder you've recorded into so i could listen? i run PT 7.4 so its all gravy
#4
maybe your playing sounds like utter crap?

im sorry i had to say it. so ur recording with the mic into ur comp, not a direct in? wheres your mic placed? is there a mic sensitivity setting or something? thats my guess. im not familiar with the mbox2 or pro tools so i cant help much.
#5
Quote by richwatkinson
How are you positioning the SM57? even close up mic's can sound weak if not in a good spot.

Actually, i have a proposition for you, could you zip and upload the pro tools folder you've recorded into so i could listen? i run PT 7.4 so its all gravy

Ok, hold on while I reinstall it.
#7
Quote by bulletrocks522
My clip


You need to zip the whole project folder because there's no audio files in what you uploaded. But you should just use File -> Bounce To -> Disc. Even though I didn't hear what you recorded, I looked at the project file and I don't think you should pan anything completely left & right (except for Drum Overhead mics). Sweet spot for double tracked guitars is 75 left, 75 right, or 50 left 25 right, depending on what you're going for. 100 left 100 right sound thin.
Last edited by BrickIsRed at Feb 14, 2009,
#8
Hard to say, exactly, without hearing a sample and perhaps a description of your methodology.

This is a perfect example of good gear =/= good recordings, necessarily.

Funny thing is, Mutt Lange could probably make a kick-ass home demo with a radio shack mic and a Soundblaster card.

Easily, half the battle is know-how... may well be *more* than half the battle. The rest is a combination of gear and recording environment.

To draw an analogy... you could give a chimpanzee a Les Paul and a Marshall stack, and it will still sound like @ss. Give an experienced guitarist a Wal-Mart-issue First Act guitar and an amp simulator plug-in, and he'll sound 1000x better.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Quote by axemanchris
Hard to say, exactly, without hearing a sample and perhaps a description of your methodology.

This is a perfect example of good gear =/= good recordings, necessarily.

Funny thing is, Mutt Lange could probably make a kick-ass home demo with a radio shack mic and a Soundblaster card.

Easily, half the battle is know-how... may well be *more* than half the battle. The rest is a combination of gear and recording environment.

To draw an analogy... you could give a chimpanzee a Les Paul and a Marshall stack, and it will still sound like @ss. Give an experienced guitarist a Wal-Mart-issue First Act guitar and an amp simulator plug-in, and he'll sound 1000x better.

CT


Yeah, a little Sound Engineering 101 study wouldn't hurt.
#10
It may have to do with levels and clipping...playing while recording requires a quieter volume than doing it live and also the microphone preamp levels should allow some headroom (space to get louder).

Positioning or mixing may also have to do with it. I don't use PT, so I'm afraid I can't help you further without screenshots of your project (including waveforms).
Quote by keiron_d
thank you sooooooo much for the advice Fast_Fingers...i would hug you if i could...i looooove you!


True love exists in UG. Can you feel it?

Recording Guitar Amps 101
#11
Are you certain you have a legit sm57?

I have been horrified by the amount of fakes around even the people selling them don't realise - they just realise they dont sound as good as a real one and sell them as faulty or they do realise and just want to get shot of them. I have found that if you ask them what colours the internal wires are you can work out if it's fake. If they say red and black - fake, if they don't answer - fake, if they say green and yellow it might be legit. I got so pissed off with them I got an AKG C1000s instead

The other thing is (apologies, I use guitar rig3 - cant be arsed with miking my cheap amps in my front room) when miking amps am I right in thinking that the point is to get a good sound coming back through the desk./computer, and not getting a killer sound out of your amp first and then trying to capture it with a mic?
EPILPSTDYamahaRBX100BassTanglewoodTW28/STRFenderchamp600CubaseStudio5Saffirepro40AlesisM1ActiveMKIIMAudioKeystation88RodeNT1AShureSM57KeeleyModTS9MackieMCUwww.myspace.com/cuthbertgriswald
#12
Quote by BrickIsRed
Sweet spot for double tracked guitars is 75 left, 75 right, or 50 left 25 right, depending on what you're going for. 100 left 100 right sound thin.


i respectfully disagree. I feel that in rock/ metal oriented music he guitars should be about %100 panned. The thickness/ meat of the music should be coming more from the kick and bass. if the thickness is really coming from the guitars you will probably have a muddy mix and/or not have left enough room for the kick and the bass to do work down the center. I would almost go as far as to say you HAVE to pan the guitars quite far out to have your mix sit right. not to mention the fact that by doing this the stereo image of your song will be much wider and professional. imo.
Quote by ILuvPillows?
Masturbate it off.
#14
I say 100 left 100 right is bad because, while on speakers the two channels might naturally come together in the room before they reach the listeners ear, on headphones, each guitar sounds completely left and completely right. It doesn't have the double tracked effect at all.
#15
Quote by TheDriller
^ fact,

rock/metal guitars should be panned however sounds best



Fixed
Epiphone Elitist SG (Serious)
Tokai Silver Star
Epiphone Dot
Epiphone Les Paul
Washburn J28SCEDL
Washburn J12S

G.A.S List

JCM600 (Yes a 600..)
#16
Take a look at any metal from the last 10 years, especially stuff produced my Sneap or Nordstrom. all panned 100%. in fact, i dare you to show me a modern metal album that isn't panned like this.
#17
Quote by TheDriller
Take a look at any metal from the last 10 years, especially stuff produced my Sneap or Nordstrom. all panned 100%. in fact, i dare you to show me a modern metal album that isn't panned like this.


You'd be surprised how often someone thinks something is panned 100% left, when if you listen with headphones, and lift the left side completely off your ear, you'll notice you still hear that guitar a little in the right headphone speaker. At most, a guitar is panned 97% left/right. (I just listened to "Letting Go" by Unearth, which has an example of this. But there are many many many examples.)
Last edited by BrickIsRed at Feb 15, 2009,
#18
Quote by TheDriller
Take a look at any metal from the last 10 years, especially stuff produced my Sneap or Nordstrom. all panned 100%. in fact, i dare you to show me a modern metal album that isn't panned like this.


Im not saying thats not true. But there are no rules in mixing.
Epiphone Elitist SG (Serious)
Tokai Silver Star
Epiphone Dot
Epiphone Les Paul
Washburn J28SCEDL
Washburn J12S

G.A.S List

JCM600 (Yes a 600..)
#19
that may be true but i think the overlap you are hearing may be attributed to the use of stereo aux/ group sends and leakage coming through the stereo field that way. i.e. if you send all guitars to a stereo bus for compression, reverb etc some of it is going to sound in the other channel.
Quote by ILuvPillows?
Masturbate it off.
Last edited by hoondog at Feb 15, 2009,
#20
Quote by hoondog
that may be true but i think the overlap you are hearing may be attributed to the use of stereo aux/ group sends and leakage coming through the stereo field that way. i.e. if you send all guitars to a stereo bus for compression, reverb etc some of it is going to sound in the other channel.


You could be right. Mastering engineers often do "stereo widening" which might bring the left and right channels together to some degree on certain frequencies. But for people recording and mixing their own stuff who want a similar result, you have to substitute techniques to get the same result.
#21
Quote by willieturnip
Im not saying thats not true. But there are no rules in mixing.


I think this is, though only about 95% true, much more valid than either of the arguments for or against panning 100%L/R.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.