#1
Hi,

I am currently building a guitar, and I think I remember reading an article on the internet recently, which sugested submerging the wood body (after sanding) into water and then leaving it to dry. Apparently Stratovarius did this with his Violins and it makes the body more porous, and thus resonates better.
Has anyone done this or heard about it?

Plus if I was to do this, how long would it take for the wood to dry-out again?

Ta'
#2
wouldn't that also make the body more prone to warping?
Quote by bassmanjoe08
Dan

Don't stop being you <3


Quote by fatgoogle
I think after this relentless adding for the last 10 mins, that Dan is the coolest looking. Goddamn welsh people and my great etc etc etc etc etc granddad is welsh.
#3
Quote by skater dan0
wouldn't that also make the body more prone to warping?


I'd think so, but I wouldn't be surprised if that only occurred while it still retained moisture.
#5
just a thought, violin bodies are incredibly thin compared to a guitar, and thus the drying time as well as a few other aspects to this practice (which i know nothing about) would probably be vastly different.
#6
i've heard of this technique(with violins as you metioned) what i recommend.
1.research it a bit more.
2.figure out what this does exactly.
3.then make your decision.
(i think it might be a different liqiud that water.
#7
Submerging a guitar body is definitely not good. The water will soak into it and wont dry out very easily. This will cause the body to crack and split. Violins are different to guitars, like swashbuckle50 pointed out, they have thin, hollow bodies. A guitar body is (usually) solid wood, and will take a long time to dry out. The only reason a guitar body should be put in water is if you're swirling it and even then it has to be sealed first.
#8
On a solid body electric guitar this is not a good idea.
Believe or not, however, i have tested this on an acoustic guitar. I soaked the body (not the neck as it isnt totally vital to resonation) and this heat dried it for several hours in, get this, a kitchen oven. I did this several times over. Apparently a chemical bond breaks down inside the wood, making it more brittle and hard (ie giving it an extremely "aged" quality). This is also why old guitars generally sound great - old, aged wood. If there is anything I know about acoustic wood instruments, the more brittle and hard, the better sounding the instrument - period.
Anyway, im still in the midst of putting this soaked/heat dried guitar back together. It was a plywood cheapie (im NOT risking my 1968 yamaki in a kitchen oven!) But I do believe, due to science, that the quality of sound should be better.
#9
Quote by GoldChocobo
On a solid body electric guitar this is not a good idea.
Believe or not, however, i have tested this on an acoustic guitar. I soaked the body (not the neck as it isnt totally vital to resonation) and this heat dried it for several hours in, get this, a kitchen oven. I did this several times over. Apparently a chemical bond breaks down inside the wood, making it more brittle and hard (ie giving it an extremely "aged" quality). This is also why old guitars generally sound great - old, aged wood. If there is anything I know about acoustic wood instruments, the more brittle and hard, the better sounding the instrument - period.
Anyway, im still in the midst of putting this soaked/heat dried guitar back together. It was a plywood cheapie (im NOT risking my 1968 yamaki in a kitchen oven!) But I do believe, due to science, that the quality of sound should be better.

Prettymuch. Thats why people like nitro lacquers too, they let the wood age. But dipping a solid body is bad.
#10
sounds like a good way to completely mess up a guitar. plus wood swells when wet and shrinks when dry so you'll seriously increase the chances of cracking the body.

i know with steel the heat it up and then dump it in oil over and over again to strengthen it or something to that effect, and it wouldnt surprise me if there is some sort of liquid you can dump wood into that might do something to it tonally but i'm sure it isnt water.
#11
Regardless of whether it makes violins sound better, I've gotta disagree with it 'making it more porous' as thats pretty impossible,

and why would I want to go and soak my lovely dried out wood in water?

Quote by McShredder
The body isn't going to warp. Pretty much never. Only necks warp.
All wood moves, there for a body can warp.




Quote by dogismycopilot
Absent Mind, words cant express how much i love you. Id bone you, oh yea.

Quote by lumberjack
Absent Mind is, as usual, completely correct.

Quote by littlemurph7976
Id like to make my love for Neil public knowledge as he is a beautiful man
#12
The Stradivarius violins were soaked in salt water that also contained other minerals that soaked into the wood. This may have something to do with the sound, it would be good for an acoustic guitar, but only before the guitar is built.
#13
I have heard a lot from acoustic builders to cook their tops. They cook spruce tops at 300 Celsius if I remember right, and it is in celsius. It's one incredibly hot temperature.

But basically it cooks the resin and a bunch of other stuff that improves sound.

Of course, that's not solid body electric. And in all reality, I really don't think you'll hear any difference.
#14
I honestly think it could only go bad.

Also,. ohspyro89 check the PM's
Just call me Bobby
Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list
Quote by mikeyElite
you build guitars worthy of sexual favors

Quote by Invader Jim
if this party gets any livelier a funeral is gonna break out.
#15
Quote by GoldChocobo
On a solid body electric guitar this is not a good idea.
Believe or not, however, i have tested this on an acoustic guitar. I soaked the body (not the neck as it isnt totally vital to resonation) and this heat dried it for several hours in, get this, a kitchen oven. I did this several times over. Apparently a chemical bond breaks down inside the wood, making it more brittle and hard (ie giving it an extremely "aged" quality). This is also why old guitars generally sound great - old, aged wood. If there is anything I know about acoustic wood instruments, the more brittle and hard, the better sounding the instrument - period.
Anyway, im still in the midst of putting this soaked/heat dried guitar back together. It was a plywood cheapie (im NOT risking my 1968 yamaki in a kitchen oven!) But I do believe, due to science, that the quality of sound should be better.

Actually, it will sound worse. While a SOLID wood guitar would sound better through this through artificial aging, which is what you are doing, a LAMINATE guitar will sound quite a bit worse, because the glue holding the thin sheets of wood together will separate more.
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#16
I think where this gets confused is when wood grows in water or in very moist ground like Swamp Ash. Because the moisture content in the wood is so high the fibres oof the wood leave bigger gaps between to store the extra water. When the wood is dried its not as dense and is lighter, ofter resulting in a more resonant wood.

Maybe if you store your wood in water for a LONG time after its been rough cut then dry it out it might change the structure of the wood making it more porous resulting in a greater resonance. I think this would be better suited to hollow body instruments rather than solid bodys though.

That might be a load of crap what I've just put, just a thought though.
Last edited by jscustomguitars at Feb 15, 2009,
#17
Quote by Natrone
Actually, it will sound worse. While a SOLID wood guitar would sound better through this through artificial aging, which is what you are doing, a LAMINATE guitar will sound quite a bit worse, because the glue holding the thin sheets of wood together will separate more.


Your probably right. I bought guitar for 5 dollars though.
I would love to try this on a "real" acoustic.
#18
I wouldnt put a ready made guitar in water, that'll just f**k it up. It needs to be raw wood before its prepared.
#19
Quote by jscustomguitars

Maybe if you store your wood in water for a LONG time after its been rough cut then dry it out it might change the structure of the wood

If I recall THIS is what Stradivarius did, soaked the raw raw wood in a briney solution with minerals before any sort of shaping or cutting.