#1
my project build is pretty neck heavy, what are some methods for cobatting the neck dive, its kinda a reverse strat but already i can tell it will neck dive, im planning on trimming some of the meat off the headstock (from strat to tele style)

what else?

any good tips?
#3
Trimming a little meat from the headstock wont make a difference. The only thing you can really do to a complete guitar is alter the position of the strap lock and use a strap with a grippy underside that'll stick to your clothing and not move much.
Last edited by jscustomguitars at Feb 15, 2009,
#4
The guitarist who played a Firebird in Lynyrd Skynyrd placed the strap over the front of the guitar instead of letting it go behind it like it naturally would.



It works pretty good, might be awkward at first, but it will definitely help.
Last edited by advanced at Feb 15, 2009,
#5
Get a **** ton of helium baloons, tie them to the neck, win.
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#6
advanced: That is completely irrelevant to what the TS wants...

It depends on wherever you put the strap pins...
#7
Quote by guitarcam123
advanced: That is completely irrelevant to what the TS wants...

It depends on wherever you put the strap pins...


How so? It solves the problem without him having to do any major reconstruction to the parts he has. Firebirds are extremely prone to neck diving, I've never played one that didn't go down, and this solves that problem and could possibly solve his problem. He stated his body shape was close to a reverse Strat, and with the body real estate on the arm cutaway (if he has one), there is more than enough room to compensate even the thickest straps without getting in the way. It works on SG's too.

And sure, it does depend on where you place the straps, but if the neck is going to dive, the neck is going to dive. With this solution, the strap physically pulls the guitar back instead of letting gravity do what it does.

Edit: Just saw his build thread, and it wouldn't work as it would interfere with the controls. Still, on most stock guitars, it is still a valid prevention of neck diving.
Last edited by advanced at Feb 15, 2009,
#8
no it makes the guitar face upwards a bit so you can see the fretboard, face of the guitar etc, it does not help neck diving...
#9
there are 3 techniques to combat head-dive:


1 - decrease the weight in the head.
2 - increase the weight in the tail
3 - move the upper strap pin closer to the head.

you may need to incorporate a little of each.
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#10
i would cut a little off the head stock and get like some get a 1 or 2 lb weight and tie it to the back strap button and then get like 8 helium bloons and then play and video it and post it on UG.... IT WILL BE GREATNESS
#11
Increasing the weight of the strap at the back helps without doing nasty things to the guitar. Yeah, I had an SG and now have a LP 12-string, so been there.
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#12
Quote by advanced
How so? It solves the problem without him having to do any major reconstruction to the parts he has. Firebirds are extremely prone to neck diving, I've never played one that didn't go down, and this solves that problem and could possibly solve his problem. He stated his body shape was close to a reverse Strat, and with the body real estate on the arm cutaway (if he has one), there is more than enough room to compensate even the thickest straps without getting in the way. It works on SG's too.

And sure, it does depend on where you place the straps, but if the neck is going to dive, the neck is going to dive. With this solution, the strap physically pulls the guitar back instead of letting gravity do what it does.

Edit: Just saw his build thread, and it wouldn't work as it would interfere with the controls. Still, on most stock guitars, it is still a valid prevention of neck diving.



if you looked on my build youd notice that it wont get in the way as im building a LEFT HANDED guitar out of a right handed strat body, just rerouting for the controls and using the old cavity or a sound hole

you idea sounds like it would work, il try.
#13
it all depends on where you place your strap buttons. play around with your strap button locations, just take a strap and use masking tape to place the strap in various places. a good rule of thumb is if the upper horn of the guitar is close to the 12th fret then the guitar shouldnt dive.
#15
Quote by advanced
The guitarist who played a Firebird in Lynyrd Skynyrd placed the strap over the front of the guitar instead of letting it go behind it like it naturally would.



It works pretty good, might be awkward at first, but it will definitely help.



woooaahh,

thats for changing the angle of the guitar so you can see the fretboard better, it really works great.
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#16
Quote by lefthandman9876
if you looked on my build youd notice that it wont get in the way as im building a LEFT HANDED guitar out of a right handed strat body, just rerouting for the controls and using the old cavity or a sound hole

you idea sounds like it would work, il try.


I hate to suggest anything that increases the weight of a guitar but, if the old electronics cavity is empty, perhaps you could experiment with weight in that space to balance the guitar.
#18
Quote by conor1148
woooaahh,

thats for changing the angle of the guitar so you can see the fretboard better, it really works great.


Have you ever played a Firebird (or a Thunderbird)? Using that technique on that guitar (or in fact, any guitar) not only does what you state, it combats neck diving. I know this because this is the way I prevent my Firebird from hitting the floor when I take my left hand off the neck.

And LeftHandMan, I only took a look at the mockups, and made an assumption.
Last edited by advanced at Feb 15, 2009,
#19
Put ball bearings or lead weights in the electronics cavities.

Simple and should work.
#20
Quote by advanced
Have you ever played a Firebird (or a Thunderbird)? Using that technique on that guitar (or in fact, any guitar) not only does what you state, it combats neck diving. I know this because this is the way I prevent my Firebird from hitting the floor when I take my left hand off the neck.

And LeftHandMan, I only took a look at the mockups, and made an assumption.


i meant that like i was adding to it, not disagreeing.

my bad.
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#21
Quote by supergerbil
Put ball bearings or lead weights in the electronics cavities.

Simple and should work.



yea i screwed the neck back on and pu tthe strap button on the back of the neck plate, it seemed completly fine, im sure once ive got the bridge and all on it will be ok, if not i will always stick some weights in there, gotta be good shielding too!

cheers guys