#1
I generally use fingerings I find more comfortable (while still playing the same notes, just at another place on the neck) rather than exactly what tabs say.

I also sometimes hammer-on where is says to pick, slide where it says to hammer on, or pick what it says to slide, etc.

is all of this a bad thing, or in contrast, does it mean I'm beginning to get to know the neck better and am developing my own style?
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#3
It's not bad to play the same notes in a different spot. It just shows that you know and easier way to play something. I never go 100% by the tab because 90% of the time they aren't 100% correct anyhow.
#4
If it sounds the same, nobody will care. Do what works for you, that's how alot of guitarists get their style.
#5
I think you are definitely developing your own style.

I mean come on, even the artists don't play it note for note every time, especially live!

I do the same thing with hammer ons are slides and alternate fingering, I think it is important that it is comfortable so you can learn better.
#6
The tabs are just how someone's interpreted the song, so playing it somewhere else on the neck doesn't matter.

With techniques, just go with what you're comfortable with.

Basically, as long as it sounds how you want it to, you're doing it right.
#7
Quote by spiroth10

is all of this a bad thing, or in contrast, does it mean I'm beginning to get to know the neck better and am developing my own style?


Not necessarily. If you're avoiding something you find difficult, you're just avoiding potentially learning something. A personal style emerges, it's not really something you consciously go about developing.

Sticking exactly to the tab (assuming it's accurate tab) depends on what you're trying to do. If you're trying to get "inside someone's head" and reproduce the original as accurately as possible, I'd stick with it exactly as written. If you just want to learn the song, and reproducing the original nuance doesn't matter, then just take what you want and leave the rest.
#8
Quote by edg
Not necessarily. If you're avoiding something you find difficult, you're just avoiding potentially learning something. A personal style emerges, it's not really something you consciously go about developing.

Sticking exactly to the tab (assuming it's accurate tab) depends on what you're trying to do. If you're trying to get "inside someone's head" and reproduce the original as accurately as possible, I'd stick with it exactly as written. If you just want to learn the song, and reproducing the original nuance doesn't matter, then just take what you want and leave the rest.

this would make sense if it was the musician and not some nerd on the internet who tabbed it
#11
Quote by ARYANMETALFIST
this would make sense if it was the musician and not some nerd on the internet who tabbed it


90% of the time it IS some nerd (have you guys looked at some of the hendrix tabs? t here are parts where they're just blatantly wrong?)

most of the time Im not avoiding anything, its just that a lot of tabs will have me scale up and down the neck of the guitar, when I can reach notes more conveniently in another position

Im not avoiding anything, I just dont like needlessly jumping around the neck to play things that are readily available while Im position playing.

If Im in 5th position, I can reach the next note in that position, and the notes coming after it are closer while Im in 5th position (say they're in 6th), then why scale all the way up the neck to play the same note in 1st position on another string?

I'll admit it looks really flashy to an audience to jump all around the neck, but it isnt always the greatest idea.
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#13
Quote by spiroth10
Im not avoiding anything, I just dont like needlessly jumping around the neck to play things that are readily available while Im position playing.

If Im in 5th position, I can reach the next note in that position, and the notes coming after it are closer while Im in 5th position (say they're in 6th), then why scale all the way up the neck to play the same note in 1st position on another string?

I'll admit it looks really flashy to an audience to jump all around the neck, but it isnt always the greatest idea.


For me, I do what feels best. But there is usually a reason someone tabbed it that way. Look at the notes that follow and figure out how comfortable they are their way, so check out both your way and theirs and see if it's better to transpose it to a different position or use theirs.

And there really isn't any downsides, unless it's a, for example, string skipping like that you can't play so you make it sweeping. Unless you don't care about string skipping... other than that go for it.
#14
Quote by spiroth10
90% of the time it IS some nerd (have you guys looked at some of the hendrix tabs? t here are parts where they're just blatantly wrong?)


Here's what I do when I want to learn a song, (which admittedly isn't all that much because I'm usually working on improvising)...

First of all, I'll NEVER use an internet tab if I 'm serious about learning. Never.
I'll look for books that have authors of established credibility. A book not only has the tab, but always has the rhythm noted. Usually this over/under standard notation. Additionally, books often contain section by section analysis, CD's with some parts slowed down, etc. For quite a lot of things, hearing the author actually play what they tabbed out gives a lot of insight to the nuances of rhythm and articulation that you could never get from PowerTab'd MIDI.

Then I work on it section by section exactly as written and, most importantly, work on the rhythm as written to a metronome.

I want to learn more than just the song, If I'm bothering to learn it, it's because there's a lot of things about it I'd like to know in addition to just liking the song.

That gives me the most mileage out of "learning a tab", but not everyone has the same goals. It's not always about what fingering is "most efficient".
Last edited by edg at Feb 15, 2009,
#15
I personally do this a lot. Playing different voicings usually shouldn't matter too much. As for slides vs. hammer/pulls vs. picking, you need to be aware of the different effect each has and use them appropriately. The only thing you should worry about is if you do things a certain way because your technique is lacking, in which case you shouldn't be lazy.
#16
Quote by edg
Here's what I do when I want to learn a song, (which admittedly isn't all that much because I'm usually working on improvising)...

First of all, I'll NEVER use an internet tab if I 'm serious about learning. Never.
I'll look for books that have authors of established credibility. A book not only has the tab, but always has the rhythm noted. Usually this over/under standard notation. Additionally, books often contain section by section analysis, CD's with some parts slowed down, etc. For quite a lot of things, hearing the author actually play what they tabbed out gives a lot of insight to the nuances of rhythm and articulation that you could never get from PowerTab'd MIDI.

Then I work on it section by section exactly as written and, most importantly, work on the rhythm as written to a metronome.

I want to learn more than just the song, If I'm bothering to learn it, it's because there's a lot of things about it I'd like to know in addition to just liking the song.

That gives me the most mileage out of "learning a tab", but not everyone has the same goals. It's not always about what fingering is "most efficient".


that is some wise advice. I've been wanting some official tab books (cant afford them)... but I suppose torrents can help with that


I really dont desire to learn the songs to cover them. I've been trying for awhile now to do improve stuff sorta like what you have on your profile (your a very good player btw) but I simply need more of a base to work off of, as well as more practice.

I decided it would be good practice and an enlightening learning experience to learn to emulate other artists more for the time being, and to return to writing my own stuff and attempting improve after I've improved both physically and been inspired mentally
Gear:

Jackson dk2m
MIM strat
peavey jsx 2x12 combo
Recording King RDC-26
Digitch RP1000
Crybaby 535Q
#17
do yourself a favor. learn songs by ear until you just can't figure out what the guitar is doing. then resort to a tab book by a credible source. if one can't be found, try out some internet tabs, but only as a reference, unless they're absolutely right. never let your computer screen be a substitute for your ear!
#18
There's a difference TS;

Like you must be able to play, what the tab states exactly, but if it's wrong then you can change it.

If you often just change things to what's more comfortable, then you don't learn new rhythmic variations etc.

It's not so much if the tab is right or wrong, but more a subject of can you play exactly what is given you, which is a VERY valuable skill.

But like I said, if the tab is wrong or not comfortable, by all means use ur own fingerings, as long as you don't sacrifice the song.

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#19
Throughout the years Ive noticed in magazines even, that the tab for one song in one magazine will be different than another mag. So I dont think its a bad thing for you to try another way of doing the same thing as long as its comfortable for you and it at least sounds right.

A friend told me once that to be a musician you learn a song and you adapt that song to YOUR style. As long as people know the tune your playing and recognize it as that then your ok. I dont believe learning a song note for note is what its about. Its our own intepretation of that song thats makes it music. Just dont listen to The Cure's version of Purple Haze. Bad example of being a musical musician!!

You should at least try to learn the songs the way their tabbed as most times these guys who tabbed them have spent a few minutes figuring out the easiest way to play something anyway. As far as the guys who sit around and tab out tunes sitting at home to publish here on Ultimate-Guitar, you have to hand it to them as their doing something to help the guys who are just starting out or to further someones playing ability. Yeah it may be wrong in a spot or two but guess what? They did it and better than me cause I cant tab a song for any amount of money. I can learn it but no tabbing here!
#20
Quote by edg
Here's what I do when I want to learn a song, (which admittedly isn't all that much because I'm usually working on improvising)...

First of all, I'll NEVER use an internet tab if I 'm serious about learning. Never.
I'll look for books that have authors of established credibility. A book not only has the tab, but always has the rhythm noted. Usually this over/under standard notation. Additionally, books often contain section by section analysis, CD's with some parts slowed down, etc. For quite a lot of things, hearing the author actually play what they tabbed out gives a lot of insight to the nuances of rhythm and articulation that you could never get from PowerTab'd MIDI.

Then I work on it section by section exactly as written and, most importantly, work on the rhythm as written to a metronome.

I want to learn more than just the song, If I'm bothering to learn it, it's because there's a lot of things about it I'd like to know in addition to just liking the song.

That gives me the most mileage out of "learning a tab", but not everyone has the same goals. It's not always about what fingering is "most efficient".

I would do this all the time, and when I do get tab books I try and learn the whole album perfectly, except for two things:

1. I learn a lot of songs so considering that tab books are about £20 at my local music shop, I don't have that kind of money to spend on every song I want to learn.

2. I like a lot of music that is not so popular (eg. Indie bands that are never played on the radio) and finding tab for some of them is just impossible. It's not just that they are not at my local shop, they actually haven't been published because there hasn't been a big enough market.
There are however tabs on the internet for some of the songs, so I use those. Most of the time though, I have to work out whole songs from ear because there is nothing anywhere to show me how to play them.

Nonetheless, I admire your technique but do you never use your ear to work out songs? It might just be because I've been forced to work out some songs, but I feel it is somehow more satisfying when you play a song that you have worked out yourself.
#22
Quote by 12345abcd3

Nonetheless, I admire your technique but do you never use your ear to work out songs?


I used to before there was a lot of pretty exact tab that covered pretty much every song I cared to learn. They usually do a much better job than I can especially with detailed faster parts and rhythm.

Anyways, I spend most of my time now working on improvisational content and technique. The one song I learned over the past 2 years, I've already pretty much forgotten. It's just a matter of priorities. It's really useful working on songs, so perhaps I'll start spending more time on that soon.
#23
Quote by spiroth10
90% of the time it IS some nerd (have you guys looked at some of the hendrix tabs? t here are parts where they're just blatantly wrong?)

most of the time Im not avoiding anything, its just that a lot of tabs will have me scale up and down the neck of the guitar, when I can reach notes more conveniently in another position

Im not avoiding anything, I just dont like needlessly jumping around the neck to play things that are readily available while Im position playing.

If Im in 5th position, I can reach the next note in that position, and the notes coming after it are closer while Im in 5th position (say they're in 6th), then why scale all the way up the neck to play the same note in 1st position on another string?

I'll admit it looks really flashy to an audience to jump all around the neck, but it isnt always the greatest idea.


i'll start by saying that, in general, it's absolutely fine to adapt tabbed versions of songs to your own style. It's YOUR guitar, YOUR performance... do what you want.

but i wanted to point out to you that many guitarists play all over the neck for more complex reasons than "being flashy." tone is the real goal with the electric guitar, and playing in different positions on the neck allows for markedly different guitar tones. the guitar has a little over two complete octaves to work with, and you get multiple occurrences of the same note on strings of different thickness... why not take advantage of all the sounds you can get from your guitar?
#24
Quote by frigginjerk
i'll start by saying that, in general, it's absolutely fine to adapt tabbed versions of songs to your own style. It's YOUR guitar, YOUR performance... do what you want.

but i wanted to point out to you that many guitarists play all over the neck for more complex reasons than "being flashy." tone is the real goal with the electric guitar, and playing in different positions on the neck allows for markedly different guitar tones. the guitar has a little over two complete octaves to work with, and you get multiple occurrences of the same note on strings of different thickness... why not take advantage of all the sounds you can get from your guitar?

Between the two E strings there is already two octaves, if you go up to the twelfth fret on the high E string you get three octaves and if you can bend the 22nd fret to 24 that's another octave - so overall the electric guitar has almost 4 octaves, not 2.

Apart from that I agree with you. The tone of each string can be very different so switching strings in the middle of a phrase can ruin the flow or make it sound disjointed at that point.
#25
Quote by 12345abcd3
Between the two E strings there is already two octaves, if you go up to the twelfth fret on the high E string you get three octaves and if you can bend the 22nd fret to 24 that's another octave - so overall the electric guitar has almost 4 octaves, not 2.


derp. i always count that wrong. anyways, cheers. guitars have a nice wide range with lots of ways to play the same thing and make it sound different, so the TS would be wise to make sure they use the whole neck.

maybe a good compromise would be to play in the same fret positions as indicated in the tab, but personalize the individual licks at those positions. you'll find that most guitarists just sort of return to the root note at the end of every phrase, and the rest in between can be whatever you want. You'll naturally want to learn the most memorable / recognizable parts of the solos, but there's places where it's okay to just improv too.
#26
Meh, I use my ear and tabs both to figure stuff out.

If I can't figure out something, I'll use the tab to get the jist of it and go from there.

I personally don't see a point in learning a song note-for-note perfectly; how are you supposed to make a song your own if you're playing it exactly as someone else plays it? That doesn't make any sense to me.

I also think it's stupid to say "NEVER use a tab if you're serious about learning a song".

Another thing is I never learn a solo note-for-note--I always improvise my own solos.
IMO a solo is something unique to the guitar player and it makes sense to me to come up with my own unique solo for a song; that's where your own style really comes into play.
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#27
There are some solos you have to play like the original, though. If you covered Stairway to Heaven, which you shouldn't do but that's for another post, you just have to start the solo the way Page did.
#28
Yeah, I can agree with that.
There are certain phrases that are vital to certain solos.
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#29
Quote by 12345abcd3
Between the two E strings there is already two octaves, if you go up to the twelfth fret on the high E string you get three octaves and if you can bend the 22nd fret to 24 that's another octave - so overall the electric guitar has almost 4 octaves, not 2.

Let's not forget 8 string guitars or one of the one's MAB has - 27 frets ftw!
#30
Quote by Sleaze Disease
Yeah, I can agree with that.
There are certain phrases that are vital to certain solos.
I think it's mostly restricted to the beginning and end of a solo, though. The middle is where you've got a lot of room to fool around.
#31
Quote by spiroth10
I generally use fingerings I find more comfortable (while still playing the same notes, just at another place on the neck) rather than exactly what tabs say.

I also sometimes hammer-on where is says to pick, slide where it says to hammer on, or pick what it says to slide, etc.

is all of this a bad thing, or in contrast, does it mean I'm beginning to get to know the neck better and am developing my own style?

no thats fine. i never play things 100% the same. actually, i usually dont learn solos i usually just make up my own to go with the song. sometimes i might use some licks that seem important to the song or that i just think are cool.

the only thing ill say is that artists may use certain fingerings and positions to give a certain tone. example, you could play the same octave of a note on a high string or a low string and while they are the same note, they sound different.
#32
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I think it's mostly restricted to the beginning and end of a solo, though. The middle is where you've got a lot of room to fool around.


Yes, agreed.

You just need too have the general "feel" down.

Like if someone is playing this mother****ing tasty bend, you shouldn't play a sweep instead. It probably won't work most of the time

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
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[font="Palatino Linotype
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