#1
So my band has just finished writing a song, and its lyrics. Problem is, I have no idea how do you sing over a finished song. Any tips and ideas? I've thought of improvising a solo above the song, then use the solo as the melody for the words but it seems to suck.
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#3
That's what I did at first, and it didn't work.
MY GEAR
Ibanez SA160QM
Laney HCM10
Squier Bullet Strat
MXR Carbon Copy
Zoom Tri Metal
Modtone Flanger(mini)
EHX LPB-1
Korg Pitchblack
Timtone acoustic
#5
Throw the lyrics away. Then do that thing with the solo you already did again, until you find something you like. Record it, and then make lyrics which fit this particular melody.
#6
I kind of agree with darkvalo

You can write some lyrics, and write the music to those lyrics with a vocal melody in mind,

or you can write the music INCLUDING the vocal melody and add lyrics to it afterwards, but it sounds like you've wrote lyrics to a song with no real consideration of how they will be sung in the song, which makes things difficult.

You probably could keep the lyrics although would need some alterations for it to fit properly. In my experience vocal melodies are generally following chord tones and rarely use more than a few notes in a scale.
#7
Oh, so that's how you do it eh? I'll start improvising a solo over the song and then I'll edit the lyrics to fit the melody. Am I getting it right? Thanks for the info guys.
MY GEAR
Ibanez SA160QM
Laney HCM10
Squier Bullet Strat
MXR Carbon Copy
Zoom Tri Metal
Modtone Flanger(mini)
EHX LPB-1
Korg Pitchblack
Timtone acoustic
#8
Yes, that's the idea. Not the way I work best, but that's really your only option, given the position you've found yourself in.

Unless you're a confident enough singer to improvise a melody vocally over the song just using "la-la-la"s or whatever.

My caution here is that each instrument - vocal included - has certain characteristics that are idiomatic to that instrument. Not everything you do on the guitar will be easy to sing.... or won't even necessarily sound good when you sing it - even though it sounds great on guitar. So, remember when you're improvising on the guitar to be always aware of "will I be able to sing this?"

Included in that, of course, is keeping in mind your vocal range.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
Do you have an ear? do you have a voice? If the answer to both of these questions is yes, just keep singing over it until you find the pitches you want to hear.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#11


SO true....

It's like saying, "I have the clothes, so my person is almost complete... .all I need now is the person!"

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
normally i record the rhythm sections first and any underlying harmony i want. then i just go over that with the words, once the vocal melody is done THEN i do the solo. alot of times its good to have bits and pieces of the vocal melody in the solo or you can use the vox melodies as ideas for the solo, i've always found that to be really catchy.