#2
you mean an inverted power chord?
where the fifth is the root?
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#4
It would be a fourth if inverted but that's not what altered means.

The term "altered" usually refers to altering a note in the chord (the fifth or an upper extension). In a powerchord it would be the fifth that is "altered" either raised or lowered a semitone.

So G7#5 is an altered chord, as is G7#9 which has an altered 9th.

As a powerchord I would write it G5+ or G5dim depending on the alteration.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Feb 17, 2009,
#5
You miss the point of a powerchord.

Powerchords aren't really chords, they're an orchestration technique (common in rock) of making a single note sound bigger and fatter. You can imply progressions with powerchords, but it's still not a chord (on it's own). To our musical ears, it still sounds like only one note.

If you altered a powerchord you wouldn't be using the power of the perfect fifth, which, in a powerchord, doesn't sound like a note on its own. You'd be using a seperate note and you'd probably build up alot of unresolved dissonance (usually a bad thing).
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#6
Quote by 20Tigers
It would be a fourth if inverted but that's not what altered means.

The term "altered" usually refers to altering a note in the chord (the fifth or an upper extension). In a powerchord it would be the fifth that is "altered" either raised or lowered a semitone.

So G7#5 is an altered chord, as is G7#9 which has an altered 9th.

As a powerchord I would write it G5+ or G5dim depending on the alteration.


It's not even a chord though, its an interval. I wouldn't consider a diminished or augmented fifth interval an altered powerchord =/
#7
Hey man I was just answering the question. I don't give a mokey's tail whether there technically is an altered powerchord or if a powerchord has to be a perfect fifth or not.

Using my common sense I simply combined the two ideas "altered" and "powerchord" and gave my interpretation of the result.

Sometimes you got to be a stickler for the technicalities, sometimes you just got to roll with the punches. I thought this was a case for the latter.

EDIT: Nevertheless I fixed it for you.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Feb 17, 2009,
#9
^ 3 notes make a chord
2 notes make a diad

a power chord isn't technically a chord, but for the majority of guitarists its referred to as a power chord for the simplicity and universality of the term.