#1
Ok, so over these last four days I've been on break (hooray for Family Day!), and I've started to really force myself to start with scales every day when I pick up the guitar. So far I've learned every major scale except and B,Db,Eb,Gb, I plan to learn those tomorrow. I know the pentatonic scales for the other 8 as well, so after I learn the rest of the major scales I plan to move onto minor scales(harmonic + melodic...if I can handle it o_o) and minor pentatonic scales of course. After that I don't know if I should learn blues scales or not, I don't really know if those scales will be incoorporated into my playing or not and I don't know really know the significance of them so if anyone could help me with that then I would greatly appreciate it

Ok so I'm learning all of this to improve my playing of course, but obviously I'm going to go nowhere without a set practice routine that I can follow. I was thinking of setting it up like this:

-10 minutes major (including pentatonic) scales
-10 minutes minor (including pentatonic) scales
-10 minutes chord switching (powerchords, major triads, minor chords, barre chords, moveable chords)

I'd probably be doing each for a little bit longer, but that's what I had in mind right now. Oh and I do use a metronome for my scales practice; I alt-pick eighth notes at 138BPM for 4 beats on each note, and eventually I'll increase it as I get more controlled and comfortable.

So any suggestions? Things I should add? Am I putting too big of a load on myself? All advice and tips are greatly appreciated
Last edited by Meticulous at Feb 16, 2009,
#2
then throw in an hour or two improv over favorite bands......................looks good man
#3
just be sure when youre learning new scales to have your metronome set to a lower BPM
thats all i got im not gonna tell you how to live your life but thatd be too much for me

to add on to what the guy above me is saying find a song that incorporates whatever your scale your working on rather than just play it
Last edited by acetherockstar at Feb 16, 2009,
#4
Quote by Meticulous

I'd probably be doing each for a little bit longer, but that's what I had in mind right now. Oh and I do use a metronome for my scales practice; I alt-pick eighth notes at 138BPM for 4 beats, and eventually I'll increase it as I get more controlled and comfortable.

So any suggestions? Things I should add? Am I putting too big of a load on myself? All advice and tips are greatly appreciated

So you play an entire scale in one beat?
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#5
Quote by jdF250
then throw in an hour or two improv over favorite bands......................looks good man


Lol I don't think I'm ready for improv yet, plus I've tried and failed on other instruments I've played >_>

Quote by tona_107
So you play an entire scale in one beat?


Ahh, sorry I meant that I play each note for four beats

edit :x
#6
once i went to a jazz conference, and the guy there suggested staying in one key for a while, and then switching once it has been mastered.
so for example, one week, focus on C, next week, focus more on G, so on and so forth...

just a suggestion that ive found helpful,


make sure to include improvising and writing in your routine as well, having set routines can often stifle creativity, and lead to playing the same kind of stuff over and over. make sure to take a little time to just jam.
#7
Arpeggios, Thirds (c,e,d,f,e,g,f,a,g,b,a,c,b,d,c; c,a,b,g,a,f,etc.), 7th chords (maj, min, dim, dom, Majmin7), modes (might take a while to learn though).
'89 MIJ Fender Strat
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#8
Quote by acetherockstar
just be sure when youre learning new scales to have your metronome set to a lower BPM
thats all i got im not gonna tell you how to live your life but thatd be too much for me


+1, playing slowly to start means slow, you can't tell your muscles how to do something correctly if you don't have time to think about it.
#9
Quote by Meticulous
Lol I don't think I'm ready for improv yet, plus I've tried and failed on other instruments I've played >_>


Without improvising, practicing scales is useless. Jam to your favourite bands like the other guy said, play along with songs and try to make up your own solos.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by Meticulous
Lol I don't think I'm ready for improv yet, plus I've tried and failed on other instruments I've played >_>
Sure you're ready - you might not be ready to improvise in public, but if you can play a scale you might as well get some use out of it. My teacher has been getting me to improvise since about my 3rd lesson - obviously I was completely rubbish at it then, but its starting to come together now, and I'm really glad he made me start doing it so early.
#12
I would add maybe 5-10 minutes of actual technique study. Things just as working on getting in tune bends, tapping, sweeping, arpeggios. (This all depends on your style of course, some of these may not need to be studied, or put off) Bends and slides though should be worked on. Just little things you can combine with your scales when you solo. Most people just practice these while soloing, but by isolating them you'll really learn to control them.

Also one thing I've always regretted was not working on Legato techniques such as hammer ons/pulls offs early on. Now that I actually want to use them, I have found they are lagging far behind the rest of my skills, so I have to sit and bring them up to par before I can really start incorporating them.

You may want to spend 5-10 mins going over the names of the notes on the fretboard, over looked but once you have it down you don't need to practice it anymore, and it's a skill lots of guitarists enjoy/wish they had.

And always incorporate some sort of ear training, even if it's just tabbing out very simple things by ear. (Improvising and learning via tab can help here as well. The latter is only a "small benefit though"

The important thing is make sure you are practicing the necessary skills to reach your goals. Don't practice anything if you don't plan to incorporate it into your playing, or if you can't find a benefit for it.
Last edited by Shallon Dark at Feb 19, 2009,
#13
What I've been doing lately is just starting out with some chords improvisation where I try to focus on switching (because I've still got problems there), then do some random other improvising, and then I go on to practice the song I'm working on.
Repeat as necesary.
You should mix it up if you're playing for like 30 minutes though.