#1
Ok, say I have a chord progression: Em, C, D ala Iron Maiden. WHat scale can I use
for it besides E Minor and G Major? I am talking about the modes such as DOrian, Locrian etc..
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#2
you can use Gb Locrian, G ionian (you already said you didnt want that one), A Dorian, B Phrygian, C Lydian, D mixolydian and then E Aeolean

E Gb G A B C D E (yea, E minor scale, Correct me if Im wrong)
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#3
Can I play E phygian and E dorian?
My Gear:
Epiphone LP Black Beauty (2007)| Washburn WM24K (2008)| Ibanez Iceman IC300 (2003)| Ibanez GRX40 (2004) w Gold Lace Sensors| Roland Microcube| Marshall G10MK.II Amp| Zoom G2.1u| BOSS Metal Zone

Yes, I am a simple guy.
#4
You sure can. You can play anything you want.

Over an Em C D progression though the E Dorian has a natural sixth so the C# against the C might cause problems. And if you use the E Phrygian it has an F and the third in the D is F# which also could cause problems.

As long as you're aware and use those notes well you should be able to do that for a different kind of sound. Maybe use the C# to imply a Caddb9 chord if you go for Dorian, or you could make the D a DMaj7.

Or you could go E Phrygian or use replace the D with a Dm or use a D7b9. Or just avoid those notes over those two chords. Or anything else that sounds good to you.

There's a few pages dedicated to doing exactly what you're talking about in one of my music theory books.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Feb 17, 2009,
#6
Quote by Don Rickles
you can play in E minor.


you're right. the TS was kinda right with his second post about E phrygian and E dorian.

no matter what, if the rest of the music is in E minor, you will either be playing in E minor, or you will be playing out of key, and it will sound wrong. All the modes and deriving them by re-ordering a scale means dick-all when it comes to this kind of question.

it's E minor. if you include a few notes that you thought of using modal theory, they will function as accidentals. they will still sound pretty cool if you use them right, but they will ALL be some kind of E minor scale with added notes.

the modes that lend themselves best to minor keys are phrygian and dorian. Locrian is minor too, but it's awfully dissonant for most music. anyways, you could play E minor, and maybe use a b2 to imply E phrygian, or use a #6 to imply E dorian. You cannot play in other keys than the key that the band is playing in.

it's important to note that you are not actually playing modal music unless every single note from every single instrument is taken from a modal scale. that's almost never the case. it's best to use modal theory to add accidentals to a standard scale, rather than to try writing with modes exclusively.
Last edited by frigginjerk at Feb 17, 2009,
#7
You seem to have missed the point of modes.

"E phrygian" (in reality C major) won't work because C major over a D chord doesn't work. D is D F# A, there's no F # in C major.
E dorian (in reality D major) won't work because D major over a C chord doesn't work. C is C E G, there's no C in D major.

If it's in E minor, play E minor. If you wanted to get spicy, you could throw in some accidentals. Like what friggin jerk implied, if you say played an F over the E minor chord (as an accidental) you might sort of imply a phrygian mode and get a similar sound. But you wouldn't play an F over a D major chord, unless you were using it as a #2 accidental (which in actual fact make it an E#). You'd need an F# over over that D major chord because you need chord tones.
This requires alot of understanding of theory and modes. It also requires Al Di Meola or Charlie Parker levels of skills to pull off tastefully.

Keeping in mind this is not actually playing modally. True modal songs don't really have chord progressions (not in the way a common western musician thinks). Chord progressions and the theorisation of chords helped bring on tonal thinking, which is a much more progressive way of writing songs than modes.
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#8
Quote by xFinnellx
you can use Gb Locrian, G ionian (you already said you didnt want that one), A Dorian, B Phrygian, C Lydian, D mixolydian and then E Aeolean

E Gb G A B C D E (yea, E minor scale, Correct me if Im wrong)


The scale would be named E F# G A B C D E

And no you could not be play any of the modes of G major apart from E Aeolian. If the chord progression is in the key of E minor, and you play for example C Lydian C D E F# A B C, you are still playing E Aeolian.
#9
If you're truly playing "Iron Maiden" style, are you just using root fifth power chords? Because I think that would open the playing field a little!
#10
That progression is in Em. Your scale will be E something. It will not be G Ionian, A Dorian, or F# Locrian. You can play E Ionian, E Dorian, or E Locrian, but you have to watch out for the notes that differ from the E natural minor scale; many of those tones will sound bad over that progression.

Your main scales for that are E Natural Minor, E Blues, and E Minor Pentatonic, and that's the way Murray, Smith, and Gers approach their solos and how Harris (and the others as well) writes the harmony lines over the progressions.
#11
Personally I like to use modes as inflections rather than full blown "I will solo in this scale". I think you should take the approach that you are soloing in E (harmonic) minor, and can use phrygian, dorian and aeolian inflections (phrygian, dorian and aeolian are the more minor sounding modes). So you can throw in accidentals of F and C sharp, and occasionally use the melodic interval of a D instead of a D sharp.
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#12
Quote by areola
Ok, say I have a chord progression: Em, C, D ala Iron Maiden. WHat scale can I use
for it besides E Minor and G Major? I am talking about the modes such as DOrian, Locrian etc..



You're pretty locked into E minor there. Modes aren't really appropriate in this situation.

Unless you want to refer to E minor as E Aeolian so you can say you're using a mode.

Quote by bangoodcharlote
n.

Your main scales for that are E Natural Minor, E Blues, and E Minor Pentatonic


^ this is true.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 17, 2009,