#1
And also, if there is, how did you find that out? Is there some kind of rule I can use?

I am asking because I made up a riff using those notes, although in the actual riff I don't use the E, I use the E an octave above it...and to write a song around it it would help if I knew the scale

Thanks very much.

NL
#2
Most likely D minor, if you add G and C.
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#4
Guitar Pro says D# diminished arpeggio.
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#5
Quote by Jango22
Guitar Pro says D# diminished arpeggio.
GP is usually accurate, so I doubt that.

It sounds like D is the root, so the intervals are 1 2 b3 #5/b6 6/b7. I've never seen this scale, so I'll consider this a synthetic scale and you can name it whatever you want.

The fact that the E you play is an octave above the other notes does not matter to finding the scale's intervals.

Upon playing the scale a bit, I feel a bit of a pull towards the E note. It will depend on what you're playing, whether the root is D or E (or something else), but the intervals for E are 1 b2 #4 5 b7. That could be a pentatonic form of Phyrgian Dominant #4 (1 b2 3 #4 5 b6 b7), which seems appropriate given the fairly exotic sound of the scale. E makes more sense from a theoretical perspective, but that doesn't mean you can't make D the root.

I'm going to have to mess around with both possibilities this weekend. I want to see what you come up with as well.
#7
Quote by michal23
F Major scale with a flattened fifth?
I don't hear anything but D or E as the root, but that's possible. It would have to be written F Bb Cb D E, though.

That actually doesn't contain a third, so it could be major or minor. However, since a 7-tone scale would have some sort of A note, that still must be written with Bb and thus Cb.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
I don't hear anything but D or E as the root, but that's possible. It would have to be written F Bb Cb D E, though.

That actually doesn't contain a third, so it could be major or minor. However, since a 7-tone scale would have some sort of A note, that still must be written with Bb and thus Cb.

There could be an A natural in the scale, because those are just the notes in TS's riff. If it resolves to D then couldn't it be D minor with a B natural thrown in.

^+1
It would be easier to see where it resolves with the riff.
#11
Quote by 12345abcd3
There could be an A natural in the scale, because those are just the notes in TS's riff. If it resolves to D then couldn't it be D minor with a B natural thrown in.
No. If it's Dm, then the A# is Bb, so the B note would have to be Cb, bb7.

I'm thinking about this with the idea that one will try to form chords from the scale and that the B note isn't just a chromatic passing tone. If it is, then this is just Dm with B as a chromatic passing tone.
#12
Quote by bangoodcharlote
No. If it's Dm, then the A# is Bb, so the B note would have to be Cb, bb7.

I'm thinking about this with the idea that one will try to form chords from the scale and that the B note isn't just a chromatic passing tone. If it is, then this is just Dm with B as a chromatic passing tone.

Ok, but seeing as the notes are from a riff the B natural could be an accidental/passing note.
#15
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Nopes.



True - apparently I can't count to 7
#16
Quote by bangoodcharlote
GP is usually accurate, so I doubt that.

It sounds like D is the root, so the intervals are 1 2 b3 #5/b6 6/b7. I've never seen this scale, so I'll consider this a synthetic scale and you can name it whatever you want.

The fact that the E you play is an octave above the other notes does not matter to finding the scale's intervals.

Upon playing the scale a bit, I feel a bit of a pull towards the E note. It will depend on what you're playing, whether the root is D or E (or something else), but the intervals for E are 1 b2 #4 5 b7. That could be a pentatonic form of Phyrgian nt #4 (1 b2 3 #4 5 b6 b7), which seems appropriate given the fairly exotic sound of the scale. E makes more sense from a theoretical perspective, but that doesn't mean you can't make D the root.

I'm going to have to mess around with both possibilities this weekend. I want to see what you come up with as well.


Sue is god, plain and simple.

(Call it the the goatse scale :3)

GOOD JOB! you invented a scale, go with sue, she knows her stuff more than anyone. I like the way it sounds, might use it sometime.
Quote by SamuelBirkett
wtf r u say make no sensical



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