#1
Hey all!

I'm new to scales and modes and i've been working on them for a couple days but i feel brain dead now and i have a couple questions.

1. Can any major fingering position be used in any key to form that keys scale? Example.. Using the C scale fingering of C D E F G A B C in the key of C appears that if i moved that same fingering patteren to A or any other key that it would form that keys scale. Is this true and is it true for all fingering patterens in the major scale?

2. Is every key named from Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aoelian and Locrian? so if i played in the D key would it be D Dorian? If it is then if i played in key D and started on the E note would this be D Phrygian?

Thanks for any help and sorry if i made no sense lol.
Last edited by LaRot at Feb 17, 2009,
#2
Quote by LaRot
Hey all!

I'm new to scales and modes and i've been working on them for a couple days but i feel brain dead now and i have a couple questions.

1. Can any major fingering position be used in any key to form that keys scale? Example.. Using the C scale fingering of C D E F G A B C in the key of C appears that if i moved that same fingering patteren to A or any other key that it would form that keys scale. Is this true and is it true for all fingering patterens in the major scale?

2. Is every key named from Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aoelian and Locrian? so if i played in the D key would it be D Dorian? If it is then if i played in key D and started on the E note would this be D Phrygian?

Thanks for any help and sorry if i made no sense lol.

1. Yes, but be aware that the B string is tuned a major third (4 frets) above the G string, as opposed to a perfect fourth (5 frets). That kinda ****s with the pattern. You just have to move the notes on the upper two strings up one fret.

2. Keys (as in key signatures, or what key a song/jam is in) are not named after the modal scales. Keys are named after chords (i.e. major or minor). Multiple different modes (modal scales) will work with, say, a D major chord. The most obvious choice to play over a D major chord would be the D major scale (or, the D ionian mode), but certain other modes may work. Try them out and see how they sound to your ears.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Feb 17, 2009,
#3
All keys has the 7 modes. The modes has the tonic other than the key.

For example: The key of C;

C D E F G A B C - Ionian
D E F G A B C D - Dorian
E F G A B C D E - Phrygian
F G A B C D E F - Lydian
G A B C D E F G - Mixolydian
A B C D E F G A - Aeolian
B C D E F G A B - Locrian

As you can see, they still use the notes from the key of C major but each have their own tonic. If you're playing in D Dorian the tonic is D but the key is C major.

As for moving patterns, if the root is on the same string but moved to different frets you are changing keys.

If you move to different fret but want to stay in the same key you have to change your patterns. There are 7 patterns, each for the 7 modes.

The chords for the key of C major are C - Dm - Em - F - G7 - Am - Bdim. Each of the modes fits the chords respectively.

All that works with any key.
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#4
Hey man not to try and hold you back or anything but my suggestion would be to really study in the major and minor scales. Really learn your intervals and the theory behind it all before moving onto Modes. They are a complex thing to learn and even harder to apply correctly. I would suggest just learn your basic scales for now and learn them in and out all the intervals everything.

Once you have a complete understanding of all that then move onto modes.

Or you can just forget everything I said and continue on how your doing. Don't let anybody else predict what you learn or your pace of learning.

Just my two cents. later.
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#5
Quote by OldRocker
All keys has the 7 modes. The modes has the tonic other than the key.

For example: The key of C;

C D E F G A B C - Ionian
D E F G A B C D - Dorian
E F G A B C D E - Phrygian
F G A B C D E F - Lydian
G A B C D E F G - Mixolydian
A B C D E F G A - Aeolian
B C D E F G A B - Locrian

As you can see, they still use the notes from the key of C major but each have their own tonic. If you're playing in D Dorian the tonic is D but the key is C major.

As for moving patterns, if the root is on the same string but moved to different frets you are changing keys.

If you move to different fret but want to stay in the same key you have to change your patterns. There are 7 patterns, each for the 7 modes.

The chords for the key of C major are C - Dm - Em - F - G7 - Am - Bdim. Each of the modes fits the chords respectively.

All that works with any key.


Damn it, no it's not!

People need to stop posting information about modes if they themselves do not know what they are talking about. it's only spreading the confusion. Now, every single person who enters this thread not knowing a thing about modes will think that D Dorian or F Lydian are in the key of C major.

THE MODES ARE NOT IN THE KEY OF THEIR PARENT MAJOR SCALE. THEY ARE IN THE KEY OF THEIR ROOT NOTE. D DORIAN IS IN THE KEY OF D.

D Dorian is in the key of D. The difference between D Dorian and D major is that D Dorian has a flat 2nd and a flat 7th; F instead of F# and C instead of C#. You would use D Dorian to solo over a progression in D as long as the chord you solo over it with has either no 2nd or 7th in it, or a flat 2nd or 7th in it (that way the notes from D Dorian don't clash with the chords).
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#6
Depends on the method, inversion method or modulation method.
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#7
Quote by LaRot
Hey all!

I'm new to scales and modes and i've been working on them for a couple days but i feel brain dead now and i have a couple questions.

1. Can any major fingering position be used in any key to form that keys scale? Example.. Using the C scale fingering of C D E F G A B C in the key of C appears that if i moved that same fingering patteren to A or any other key that it would form that keys scale. Is this true and is it true for all fingering patterens in the major scale?

2. Is every key named from Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aoelian and Locrian? so if i played in the D key would it be D Dorian? If it is then if i played in key D and started on the E note would this be D Phrygian?

Thanks for any help and sorry if i made no sense lol.


1. Yes, that's ture. Start learning the notes of the fretboard. The notes repeaty themselves all across the fretboard, so if you know the notes you won't have to think in box shapes anymore.

2. Don't wory about modes at all. Pretty much all information you find about them here is wrong (see my above post). You won't be using modes for a long time. Just stick to using the major scale. For example, use the A major scale to solo over an A major chord progression. Let's say that the progression is A major - D major - F# minor - E major. You would use the A major scale over the whole progression. You don't switch to D Lydian for the D chord and F# Aeolian for the F# minor chord as everyone else tells you; that's wrong. You might play a D major arpeggio when you get to the D chord, or play a lick that centers around a D note to emphasize the chord underneath, or you might harmonize the D major chord with an F# ( major 3rd interval) or an A (perfect 5th interval), both common intervals for harmonizing. Or you might even just noodle around with the A major scale over the D major chord, paying no attention to the fact that there was a chord change. Anything works, as long as you're still playing A major.
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