#1
Hey guys, I have a little trouble improving to backing tracks. I have been messing around with some blues tracks and it just doesnt sound right. i am playing in the right key, but i cant seem to play to the rhythm. Here are some vids of me playing to them... Please let me know if there is anything i can work on.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1070614

Thanks!

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
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Lamb of God 7/14/10
#2
You need to work on your bending, bro.

Subjectively, I think you need a fatter, smoother tone, and you need to FEEL the music.


You know what, try improvising over the top of Built for Comfort, as covered by UFO. It's in C# minor. That song in particular really helped me out. 'Course, if you don't feel that song, just find one that you do. The more you resonate with a song, the easier it is.

'Tube link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0GVkvdKvJ8s
Last edited by Vykk Draygo at Feb 18, 2009,
#3
Learn to bend properly, your not using your wrist to bend, instead your using one finger which is resulting in you not bending in tune due to the fact you cant get enough force to reach the note.

Also think about making some notes last longer and some shorter, add variety. Make use of dynamics,you might want to do a lick agressively and then end on a softer note to give a drastic effect.

And although not essential a clean tone might help.


hope this helped
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Feb 18, 2009,
#4
Start practicing to a metronome. You were pretty much just playing random notes with respect to timing -- there may as a well not even have been a backtracking track the way you were hitting notes.

Because of the above, there was no phrasing at all. Nothing was being communicated.

I'd suggest learning some blues riffs. Learn them to a rhythm EXACTLY. You should know what beat it starts on and be able to count them out to a beat. Then practice them over the backing track. They don't have to be hard.
#5
Quote by edg
Start practicing to a metronome. You were pretty much just playing random notes with respect to timing -- there may as a well not even have been a backtracking track the way you were hitting notes.

Because of the above, there was no phrasing at all. Nothing was being communicated.

I'd suggest learning some blues riffs. Learn them to a rhythm EXACTLY. You should know what beat it starts on and be able to count them out to a beat. Then practice them over the backing track. They don't have to be hard.



thats another thing, i practice w/ a metronome occasionally but i dont see the point of it. i hit a note on each beat, sometimes 2 notes per beat, and sometimes 4 notes per beat. but i dont understand what it does. because every song/rhythm is different. i just dont understand it how doing it can apply to every song. any help?

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
RHCP 4/28/07
RAtM 4/29/07
Black Label Society 3/7/09
Black Label Society 5/4/09
Metallica 12/7/09
Alice in Chains 2/8/10
Lamb of God 7/14/10
#6
that might be why you're not getting the most out of it. instead of always hitting 1 2 or 4 notes a beat, mix it up and experiment to see what different kind of rhythms or phrases you can come up with. try looking at different ways of dividing the beat. 2 notes per beat is eight notes. 4 would be sixteenth. what if you did an eight note and two sixteenth notes? or a sixteenth note, sixteenth note rest then an eight note? this is where you're going to develop your own vocabulary of rhythms (also from learning songs of course).
just set the metronome and really think about the beat and the subdivisions, or write out some random ones and try them out, and just jam it. after a short while you'll be easily coming up with new stuff because it doesn't take long to exhaust what you already know.

edit: also practice triplets!
#7
Music is sound in time, so if you don't pay attention to time then your missing half the picture. Learn some blues songs, alot of blues songs. The best way to learn the blues is to play it and feel it. Try learning at least ten blues songs before you start trying to come up with your own, even less make one up on the spot.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
Quote by forty6and2
but i dont understand what it does. because every song/rhythm is different. i just dont understand it how doing it can apply to every song. any help?


You really should try and understand how every song/rhythm is also similar. A metronome simply plays a consistent element you'll find in almost all songs - a steady, underlying beat.
#9
ok, its making much more sense. But what about songs that has a mild beat, but the solo is really fast, what would they be doing? Also, can you pick a random song and tell what note patters the guitarist is playing? such as quarter notes, eighth notes, etc...?

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
RHCP 4/28/07
RAtM 4/29/07
Black Label Society 3/7/09
Black Label Society 5/4/09
Metallica 12/7/09
Alice in Chains 2/8/10
Lamb of God 7/14/10
#10
Try the soloing link in my sig.

Quote by forty6and2
But what about songs that has a mild beat, but the solo is really fast, what would they be doing?
Define "mild beat" and "really fast." I consider 16th note triplets at 120 quite fast, even though 120 is a mild tempo in my opinion. That's around the same speed as the tapping lick at the beginning of Hot For Teacher.

Quote by forty6and2
Also, can you pick a random song and tell what note patters the guitarist is playing? such as quarter notes, eighth notes, etc...?
I usually can, but I've been playing for a decade.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Feb 19, 2009,
#11
Quote by forty6and2
Hey guys, I have a little trouble improving to backing tracks. I have been messing around with some blues tracks and it just doesnt sound right. i am playing in the right key, but i cant seem to play to the rhythm. Here are some vids of me playing to them... Please let me know if there is anything i can work on.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1070614

Thanks!


To me it sounds like you know the scales, but have no experience actually playing blues. Spend some time listening to blues. Spend some time learning how to play blues solos.... Find some solos that you like and learn them. Try to capture every nuance of the original solo as closely as possible. Immerse yourself in the style.

regarding technique..... Try using your whole hand to vibrato rather than just your finger. you're vibrato technique isn't consistent with how most blues players do it, and does not sound stylistically correct. Watch some vids of good guitarists and see what they are doing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1GSpbuFSr2o&feature=related
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 19, 2009,
#12
well, for the mild beat, im thinking something like black label society... their isnt too much fast drum pounding... it seems pretty "mild" but zakk wylde goes crazy fast on the solo's

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
RHCP 4/28/07
RAtM 4/29/07
Black Label Society 3/7/09
Black Label Society 5/4/09
Metallica 12/7/09
Alice in Chains 2/8/10
Lamb of God 7/14/10
#13
Quote by The_Sophist
Learn some blues songs, alot of blues songs. The best way to learn the blues is to play it and feel it. Try learning at least ten blues songs before you start trying to come up with your own, even less make one up on the spot.


Good advice.
#14
Quote by forty6and2
well, for the mild beat, im thinking something like black label society... their isnt too much fast drum pounding... it seems pretty "mild" but zakk wylde goes crazy fast on the solo's
Probably 16th note triplets and 32nd notes.
#15
hah, thats crazy to think that someone can go that fast and know EXACTLY what they are doing in corellation to the beat.

that video w/ friedman is very informative so far, thanks!

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
RHCP 4/28/07
RAtM 4/29/07
Black Label Society 3/7/09
Black Label Society 5/4/09
Metallica 12/7/09
Alice in Chains 2/8/10
Lamb of God 7/14/10
#16
oh, im at the part in the lesson wheres hes talking about arpegiating (i dunno if thats how its spelled) the chords. so, hes just hitting the same notes throughout the fretboard that the chords make up correct? if so, learning all the notes on the fretboard would seem to be the most important thing to learn, right?

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
RHCP 4/28/07
RAtM 4/29/07
Black Label Society 3/7/09
Black Label Society 5/4/09
Metallica 12/7/09
Alice in Chains 2/8/10
Lamb of God 7/14/10
#17
Quote by forty6and2
if so, learning all the notes on the fretboard would seem to be the most important thing to learn, right?
Knowing the notes is not that important, but your fingers need to be able to know where to go for the next note you want to play. It isn't so important to know that you're playing E and then G, but you should know that to get from the note you're playing (E) to the note you want to play next (G) you need to go up a minor third. This probably sounds impossoble, but with time, it becomes completely natural. At a certain point, there is no longer a cognitive component to playing; you just know where to go to get the desired sound.

Not surprisingly, you need to be good many aspects of guitar playing to be a good soloist.

Edit: No, I took it too far. There is still a cognitive aspect, but much of it goes away. You don't think about the notes being a minor third apart; your fingers go there when you want that sound. You do still think sometimes, but it almost becomes a reflex.
Last edited by bangoodcharlote at Feb 19, 2009,
#18
true... so if you were in my position, what would you start to learn? i know thats kinda impossible because you dont know what i know and im not ging to say everything that i kno, haha. but what did you practice the most to gain melodic control?

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
RHCP 4/28/07
RAtM 4/29/07
Black Label Society 3/7/09
Black Label Society 5/4/09
Metallica 12/7/09
Alice in Chains 2/8/10
Lamb of God 7/14/10
#19
Learn theory. That's a vital aspect of playing. Practice technique however you like, whether it's by learning songs or exercises; you need technical proficiency, of course. All along the way, learn some of your favorite solos or bits of solos; you can't steal something like the lick to begin the fast part of Sweet Child O' Mine, but less unique licks are fair game.

Make sure you're improvising, too. You need to apply this stuff to improv to get good at improv. Remember that it's okay to suck at something when you first start doing it.
#20
cool, thanks for the replies and help

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
RHCP 4/28/07
RAtM 4/29/07
Black Label Society 3/7/09
Black Label Society 5/4/09
Metallica 12/7/09
Alice in Chains 2/8/10
Lamb of God 7/14/10
#21
Quote by forty6and2
ok, its making much more sense. But what about songs that has a mild beat, but the solo is really fast, what would they be doing?


You bring up a good point. The only thing people seem to practice is 16th notes. But, what if it's a slow tempo song? 16th notes aren't going to sound all that fast.

You have to go with other notes: pentuplets, 32nd, etc... How many people practice those so they're proficient at them? Probably not too many. It's VERY good to practice these often to get a feel for them -- there's lots of moderate - slow tempo songs. That's why I generally just set my metronome tempo in the 60-80 range and leave it there. When I want to "play fast" I practice different subdivisions. It's much better to use a metronome to feel the beat, rather than constantly increasing it to see how fast you can play 16th notes (and probably not feel the beat very well).

Another option you'd have is to "float" the notes. But, you still have to be aware of the timing so you land on a beat. I've heard it described as "tumbling down a flight of stairs but landing squarely on your feet" -- a good description.

Anyway, based on your playing I think you need to practice ALL beat subdivisions including "slow" ones -- you should have a VERY good feel for 1/4, 1/8 and triplets and then 16ths which were all pretty absent from what I saw.
#22
Quote by Ead
that might be why you're not getting the most out of it. instead of always hitting 1 2 or 4 notes a beat, mix it up and experiment to see what different kind of rhythms or phrases you can come up with. try looking at different ways of dividing the beat. 2 notes per beat is eight notes. 4 would be sixteenth. what if you did an eight note and two sixteenth notes? or a sixteenth note, sixteenth note rest then an eight note? this is where you're going to develop your own vocabulary of rhythms (also from learning songs of course).
just set the metronome and really think about the beat and the subdivisions, or write out some random ones and try them out, and just jam it. after a short while you'll be easily coming up with new stuff because it doesn't take long to exhaust what you already know.

edit: also practice triplets!



hey, i used your advice and i made a little picture in this post...
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1071936
is that what you were talking about w/ dividing them up?
(the little illustartion is down in the post)

Peavey 6505+
Les Paul Custom Silverburst

Tool 5/5/06
Tool 11/24/07
Tool 12/8/07
RHCP 4/28/07
RAtM 4/29/07
Black Label Society 3/7/09
Black Label Society 5/4/09
Metallica 12/7/09
Alice in Chains 2/8/10
Lamb of God 7/14/10