#1
My older brother always told me to keep my fingers close to the neck but they're still flying around while I play.

What can I do to make my fingers hug the neck?
#3
Practise, plus it's quite likely to happen as you play faster things up to tempo as this will cut down on the distance between your fingers and strings.

Epiphone Les Paul Standard w/ SD Alnico Pro II's
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#4
good point. I'mlearning the Kill Em All album right now, and I'm doing the 4 finger exercise Kirk shows in Guitar Legends...that's when I noticed the issue. I'll try the slow thing, since I'm about to start using a metronome.
#5
The metronome is a good idea. Just like they said, play slow, and take note of where your fingers are as you fret the notes. After a while they will just stay close to the neck automatically.
#7
^ +1

if you train yourself to play with your fingers flying around then thats what they'll do. generally you dont need much force or movement in your hands to get them from point a to b. i recommend FP's vid, dude knows his stuff.
#8
I find that if you just focus on music, your fingers will do what they have to. If they are too far away you simply won't be able to play, so you'll bring your fingers as close as they need to be naturally. It's not something you have to spend hours practicing.

* unless you're talking about an absolute beginner level where you need to learn the fundamentals.

While exercises are appealing, most of those types of issues will be worked out simply by playing music on your guitar.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 18, 2009,
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
I find that if you just focus on music, your fingers will do what they have to. If they are too far away you simply won't be able to play, so you'll bring your fingers as close as they need to be naturally. It's not something you have to spend hours practicing.

* unless you're talking about an absolute beginner level where you need to learn the fundamentals.

While exercises are appealing, most of those types of issues will be worked out simply by playing music on your guitar.


Word. I've actually been playing guitar for like seven years now, I just never really thought it was an issue until now.
#10
If they are too far away you simply won't be able to play, so you'll bring your fingers as close as they need to be naturally. It's not something you have to spend hours practicing.


With all due respect, GM, I wouldn't be able to play a lot of what I play (and previously aspired to play) without hours of specific practice on this issue.

For some players, in some genres, your statement holds true, but it is equally true that some regular and focused practice on this particular issue (not necessarily amusical) will lead to much greater technical improvement in a short space of time - and that may be what some people need or want.
#11
Quote by Freepower
With all due respect, GM, I wouldn't be able to play a lot of what I play (and previously aspired to play) without hours of specific practice on this issue.

For some players, in some genres, your statement holds true, but it is equally true that some regular and focused practice on this particular issue (not necessarily amusical) will lead to much greater technical improvement in a short space of time - and that may be what some people need or want.



With all due respect I disagree. it's my experience that the statement holds true for any genre (not just the "lesser" genres as you imply, or the "less talented /technically advanced" players as you also imply). Also while, some people are indeed sold on the idea of getting better "technically" in a short time span, I disagree that they need to. If that technique isn't applied musically, if it isn't connected to the mind, then it's not nearly as useful as it could be.

I believe that focusing on any issue can be helpful, (and sometimes necessary) but in this instance I don't see it as being something you need to spend that much time on unless you specifically have a problem with it. For example you're trying to play a piece of music that has a fast legato run that requires all four fingers...... well in that case you're not going to be playing that fast legato run unless your fingers are in position and close to the fret- board. you won't be able pull it off any other way, so as you work on the music you will be training your fingers as well.


I kind of see this the same way I see the quasi-chromatic exercises. Its something you do because you heard that it's supposed to make you "better". In reality I believe that had you focused on music (and that includes all of the techniques and concepts involved), you would have achieved the same thing, and possibly much more.

Anyway, that's my take on it, and I do respect your opinion.


The main reason I jumped in on this is that I believe that people often get so caught up following advice in an attempt to get "good", and to play "properly", that they don't end up spending time playing music. Instead they just do these types of exercises.
My guess is that that's kind of what going on with the TS. His brother told him that that's how you're supposed to play, so now he's worried about it, when he might actually be fine.

TS:

if you watch a lot of pro players play, you'll notice that there is time when their fingers are not extremely close to the fretboard. it just depends on what they're playing.

Watch Paul Gilberts pinky in this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ES1RypBww_g&feature=related

Look at Eric Johnsons fingers at 1:03

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Sh1P0earDU

Steve Vai... pause at :48 (pinky is way off... and it's a fast run)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4AVXax5AXOA


so my point here is that it's not necessary to ALWAYS have your fingers close to the fret board. And as evidenced in those videos, many guitar players don't.
It depends on what you're playing. the music that you're playing will dictate what you need to do with your fingers, and with enough practice they will cooperate.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 19, 2009,
#12
(not just the "lesser" genres as you imply, or the "less talented /technically advanced" players as you also imply)


Aside from this (and some little niggles that would basically lead to me reiterating my first post), I pretty much agree with you. I ain't into that "lesser genres" bull****, btw.

Anyhoo, I think seeing both views put forth allows people to easier ascertain the shape of the truth they both shed light on, no?