#1
I'm just starting to delve into theory and I'm wondering if these are the right chords that go into the D major Scale.

1. D
2. Em
3. Fm
4. G
5. A
6. B dim
7. C
#2
1. D
2. Em
3. F#m
4. G
5. A
6. B min
7. C# Dim

The D major scale is D E F# G A B C# D
W W h W W W h (This is the major scale formula)

If you are harmonizing a major scale in triads (three note chords) you get the following sequence: Major, Minor, Minor, Major, Major, Minor, Diminished (That is true to all the major scales)
The cliched "rig" Signature:

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Last edited by crimson moon at Feb 18, 2009,
#5
The pattern for arriving at the notes is as follows;

whole whole half, whole whole whole half.

D - E - F# - G - A - B- C#- D

For tonality, major/minor/minor/major/major/minor/diminished.

Edit: Look up the circle of fifths.
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#6
Quote by Th3~one~an~0nly
thanks but could anyone tell me why it's F#m and is the seventh chord always diminished.


That is because you are harmonizing in thirds: the relationship between the notes in the C#dim chord (C# E G) is that each note is a minor third away)

it is F#m because you are stacking a minor 3rd over a major third.

Sorry if this confuses you. hopefully you know your intrevals.
The cliched "rig" Signature:

ESP LTD EC-1000VBL (EMG-ed)
Dean Cadillac SilverBurst Left-handed
Boss GT-8
Roland Micro-Cube
Line 6 FlexTone III XL
Levy's straps
Last edited by crimson moon at Feb 18, 2009,
#8
Quote by crimson moon
That is because you are harmonizing in thirds: the relationship between the notes in the C#dim chord (C# E G) is that each note is a minor third away)

it is F#m because you are stacking a minor 3rd over a major third.

Sorry if this confuses you. hopefully you know your intrevals.


Is it because the note you are starting on is F#, yeah I think I got the intervals down but I'll take another look.
Last edited by Th3~one~an~0nly at Feb 18, 2009,
#9
You learned your intervals in five minutes?

What is a perfect fifth above C?
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#10
Quote by TheGallowsPole
You learned your intervals in five minutes?

What is a perfect fifth above C?


Nah I've been looking over them on and off for about a month but I'm just now getting serious about trying to learn theory. What do you mean above?
#11
The perfect fifth is an interval, a perfect fifth above C would be G.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#13
any diatonic major key you're in, the I, IV and V chords will always be major triads.

a major triad has a root, major 3rd, and perfect 5th.

the ii, iii, vi chords are minor triads.

minor triads have the root, a minor 3rd, and a perfect 5th.

vii chord is diminished, which means it has the root, minor 3rd, and lowered (diminished) 5th.

example. we'll keep it easy, the key of C.

the notes in C major: C D E F G A B

you get the I chord from the root, C, the third, E and the 5th, G.
ii chord: D F A
iii: E G B
IV: F A D
V: G B D
vi: A C E
vii: B D F

and there you go.

it works with any major key. i hope it helped some.
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