#1
I want a typical 'metal' harmony, how do i do it? I can cope with theory.
I have a GP file, but it won't let me upload, I can send it to people who can help.
#2
For a 'basic' metal harmony, I say to go with thirds. Make the first guitar play the root note and the second to play the thirds. If you know what key you're playing in, it should be easy to determine wether the third should be minor or major.
I do not believe in sigs.
#3
^ thats good too but usually more for the lower strings if you want it onthe higher strings have one guitar play the root and the second play the 5 NOT THE POWER CHORD the 5 is also the note directly below the root so say 5th fret 1st string, the 5 is 5th fret 2nd string
#4
Quote by DKMfreak410
^ thats good too but usually more for the lower strings if you want it onthe higher strings have one guitar play the root and the second play the 5 NOT THE POWER CHORD the 5 is also the note directly below the root so say 5th fret 1st string, the 5 is 5th fret 2nd string


no, the fifth would be what the power chord would be, directly under is a major third.

I like to harmonize using the raltive majors/minors. if its in the key of G major your harmony will be in the key of E minor
#5
Yeah mess around with 3rd's and 6th's as well.
Originally posted by arrrgg
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#6
Personally, if I'm harmonising 2 guitars, I'll go with 3rds (minor or major), if I'm harmonising 3, I'll go with root, 3rds(minor or major), and perfect 4ths. Sounds weird in theory, but it sounds good.
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#7
if its like power metal thirds usually, sixths usually add some colour to the chord.
for me though? tritone for that really creepy stuff, esp if you can get a sheppards tone going.
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