#1
I've been doing this recently, when I first started guitar I was a huge pop-punk fan and wrote alot of that, but my tastes changed over time and I wasn't a huge fan of what I had written, but recently I've been going back and re-writing or changing some pop-punk songs I wrote to be much better, like a few minutes ago I finished a re-write of a fairly simple major key Verse-Chorus-Bridge-Chorus-Outro Verse song and it turned out with a counterpoint-ish intro and a very funky bass line.

tl;dr, ever re-write an older song of yours?
#2
Nope.

I don't think my tastes will change. I'm into classical music, and I don't see myself writing anything other than that stuff, maybe some electric guitar solo stuff too.

And even if my tastes changed, I don't think I'd go back and change my older stuff, I'd just write new stuff.
#3
of course. especially when im working in a studio. ill rewrite a song every day if i have too for a week to get it to be the best thing that i can write at the time. no song is ever perfect the first time through.
#4
totally, all the crap, and I mean crap, I wrote when I had no idea what I was doing. Cause I'll be damned if there wasnt a strong foundation i jsut didnt know what i was doing.
#6
yup. usually its once i can play what i wanted. such as i'll use more complex chord changes or something instead of the standard power/maj/minor chords. once i get a feel for the song, change it up to give it more feel.
#7
well, sorta. I've never actually rewritten a song, but a lot of times I'll steal riffs from my old songs. Like I have a bunch of old songs that I wrote that have some cool riffs, but it doesn't flow very well, just sounds like a noob jamming. So whenever I'm writing a song for my band I'm in now and I can't think of a goos riff that works I'll suddenly remember an awesome riff I wrote a long time ago and it fits so perfectly, I just move it to the key of the song I'm working on and mix it up a little to make it fit better.


other times when I really feel like writing a song but I can't think of a good riff to work from (I normally come up with an awesome riff and then work from there) I'll go back and look through my old material that didn't go anywhere and find a gem. like that melody/riff in my profile called 'here's a little song I wrote' I'm currently working on making a full song out of.

there are a couple songs I'd like to rewrite like "Menace" and "Shallow Grave" in my profile, but I don't have the time/energy and I need to get the band in on it, but there's already so much we need to get done as it is.
#8
once i declare a song finished its finished i dont go back and work on it anymore.............usually but there have been exceptions
#9
I wrote a power chord progression when I was a beginner that I ditched because I couldn't picture being in any kind of song I would actually like.

Then I picked it up again, later on, wrote other parts to the song, fixed things up, and now it is the BEST song I have ever written.

Never let ideas go to waste.

*Also, once you come back to songs that you wrote previously, you find more and more ways to fix it up.
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#10
Well, most of the time I just have spontaneous ideas that I can't find a way to continue or simply I don't have the need to do it..

Some times when I'm going to write a new song I check all those previous ideas (in powertab/tabs, etc most of the time, don't have any notation software apart from guitar pro) and sometimes I use them as starting point for my songs, or include them somehow...
#11
Yeah for sure. Probably the most common example for me is if I write a cool chord progression, and have a band that doesn't suit the original style. I'll adapt the chord progression to it.
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#12
Well, I've written two incomplete songs (I'm not very good yet) so far. The first one has at least two versions to it, maybe three, from changing things up (which actually happened because I messed up playing it once, and liked it), and the second one I just spent about an hour writing the intro to (this one I'm writing every part to, the other was just guitar part). I'll probably find something later that I don't like, or when I bring it to the band one of them will probably change something, but right now I'm pretty satisfied with myself.

tl;dr Yes.
#13
I'm doing this all the time.
Every song i wrote sounded really good to me..at the beginning.
The more i listen to it the more i dislike pretty much everything about it.
So i'm busier with re-writing old songs than writing new material.
#14
Short answer.... yes. A song is something that naturally evolves over time. The recording of the song that winds up on the album is merely a snapshot of what that song sounded like at that moment in time - just like a photograph is a representation of how you looked on a particular day. You look back on it later and realize, "hey, I've put on weight!" Songs evolve like that too.

However... if I'm working an idea and it sucks.... I just abort it before it ever gets born. In that respect, I don't bother re-writing. Just kill it and move on.

CT
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#15
Not the full song but I'd go back and tweak little bits but I'd usually always keep the foundation of a full song.
#16
I would like to, but unfortunately, I still write in the same crappy style I used to write in, so it wouldn't be worth it ... Damn pop-punk, I don't even listen to that style