#1
So about a year ago, my uncle gave me this really old classical guitar, which sounds really good when played softly but buzzes alot by the bridge when played louder. (it's not the frets, trust me, the action is waaaay too high). And around the beggining of the school year, I heard something rattling around in my guitar, and ended up shaking out a nut and a washer(sp?).

The same thing happened today, but I can't tell where they're coming from. I actually accidentaly Inhaled a lot of dust while tring to look inside my guitar .
So, does anyone have an Idea of whats going on? like where all this metal crap is coming from?

(also, about the buzzing on my guitar; I think the cause may be that the strings are resting too loosley on the saddle, you can actually wiggle them around and stuff. I was thinking about somehow carving deeper nitches into the saddle, but I don't know how I would go about doing this.)
I'm gonna suffer for the rest of my life

But I will always find a way to survive
#2
They shouldn't be resting weakly on the saddles, not if it's tuned up correctly, there would be too much tension. Are you sure those screws weren't holding the bridge/saddles on? Maybe it's loose.
#3
ok my frets used to buzz and when i checked my guitar, there was a minor crack.. so i filled the crack with some gum and now the sound is gone..
just sharing my experience..
#4
While it's not normal for a classical to have a truss rod, some do, and that nut and washer could be from the end of that, which could be at the end of the neck, up under the soundhole/neck end of the guitar.
When you say you might want to file notches into the saddle, don't do it. The saddle is supposed to have a nice smooth surface to it, no notches. The nut is the part with the notches cut into it for the strings as they head up to the tuners.
Classical nylon string guitars traditionally have much less tension on the strings than a steel string guitar will have. Because of this, if anything is loose at or near the bridge, you could be getting rattling from there. I'd remove all of the strings and have a good look inside of the guitar with lots of light and a mirror. If you can fit your hand inside, feel around for loose bracing and whatnot. Also see of it has a truss rod that may be missing the nut and washer.
Also, if the guitar is old and hasn't been maintained, the wood may be dried out and need humidity. You said it was really dusty, perhaps it just needs some TLC. In either case, sounds like it needs a good cleanup. You can get one of those can's of compressed air like for dusting off pc's and tv's, and blast that inside while holding a vacuum cleaner hose by the soundhole. That will help get rid of that dust.
Check under the saddle piece if you can remove it to make sure the slot in the bridge for it is nice and flat and clean. The saddle should fit evenly in the slot and not wobble around.
If you find you need to lower the action, then the saddle is how you do it. You rub the bottom of it along a piece of sandpaper taped to a flat surface. You can remove very small amounts this way and still keep it completely flat, which is critical for sound.
#5
Quote by LeftyDave
While it's not normal for a classical to have a truss rod, some do, and that nut and washer could be from the end of that, which could be at the end of the neck, up under the soundhole/neck end of the guitar.
When you say you might want to file notches into the saddle, don't do it. The saddle is supposed to have a nice smooth surface to it, no notches. The nut is the part with the notches cut into it for the strings as they head up to the tuners.
Classical nylon string guitars traditionally have much less tension on the strings than a steel string guitar will have. Because of this, if anything is loose at or near the bridge, you could be getting rattling from there. I'd remove all of the strings and have a good look inside of the guitar with lots of light and a mirror. If you can fit your hand inside, feel around for loose bracing and whatnot. Also see of it has a truss rod that may be missing the nut and washer.
Also, if the guitar is old and hasn't been maintained, the wood may be dried out and need humidity. You said it was really dusty, perhaps it just needs some TLC. In either case, sounds like it needs a good cleanup. You can get one of those can's of compressed air like for dusting off pc's and tv's, and blast that inside while holding a vacuum cleaner hose by the soundhole. That will help get rid of that dust.
Check under the saddle piece if you can remove it to make sure the slot in the bridge for it is nice and flat and clean. The saddle should fit evenly in the slot and not wobble around.
If you find you need to lower the action, then the saddle is how you do it. You rub the bottom of it along a piece of sandpaper taped to a flat surface. You can remove very small amounts this way and still keep it completely flat, which is critical for sound.



took the words right out of my mouth!!!!!haha great minds think alike... the problem i probably due to a minor crack in one of the frets,easy job to repair it..
Music...Enough said.



Merci

Such is life.....
#6
I agree, sounds like part of the truss rod.
spare parts, throw them away.
lol
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