#1
As much as I love just playing, I find improving and playing two terms very hard to distinguish...

I mean... is the best way to practice and improve to just set a clear goal for a session (Such as.... play Chromatic scale up and down the strings beginning in A at 100bpm), or just learn new songs and gradually increase speed. I say this cos although I've seen improvements in my playing over the last 2 months (I now play at least 2 hours a day), I don't know if my method is the best way... I basically play chromatics (5,6,7,8, next strings 5,6,7,8, and so on all the way up then back down) for about 30-40 mins, with my goal each time to increase by 1bpm each day.

Then I just pick out the songs I'm learning and try and play them accurately and gradually faster all the way through.

Is this good in the long run?
#2
there's little point in setting exercises as goals, they're just a means to an end. Instead look at the big picture and try not to lose sight of why you play the guitar.
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#3
id say improving is getting better at what you''re doing (obviously). But improving instead of practicing would be for instance , say you couldn't play a legato run in a song , you'd target that run and practice that over and over until you can do it , instead of just playing through the song. So you target what you are trying to improve
#4
Quote by professorlamp
id say improving is getting better at what you''re doing (obviously). But improving instead of practicing would be for instance , say you couldn't play a legato run in a song , you'd target that run and practice that over and over until you can do it , instead of just playing through the song. So you target what you are trying to improve

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#5
Develop YOUR sound by having fun playing whatever you like, and comes natural. Develop skills and improve by learning songs slowly at first, and getting up to speed. I find the two to be very beneficial when compounded. One improves the other and vice versa.
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#7
When i took lessons, I was told to do the same thing, and that it's an exercise to help get your hands coordinated. And as you get faster, you're hands get more coordinated.
#9
For me the two have always been synonymous. But if you feel differently, to be honest, I find playing, having fun and making good noises more entertaining and more the point of guitar(and music in general) than figuring out every little scale on the neck.
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#11
It means quoted for truth.
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#12
This is the way I practice. I usually play my lesson for the week for a while then in between practicing that I kinda play around and improvise to work on that skill as well. Alot of times I will play riffs that I already know during that time too just so I dont forget how to play them.
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#14
Quote by necrosis1193
For me the two have always been synonymous. But if you feel differently, to be honest, I find playing, having fun and making good noises more entertaining and more the point of guitar(and music in general) than figuring out every little scale on the neck.

Same goes for me, music is about having fun, and, I prefer doing some nonsense on guitar (improvising and so on), which pleases me, instead of learning every possible scale.
#15
Weyy bumped up my BPM another notch...

I think doing simple runs faster and faster and learning more and more songs is actaully effective as hell...
#16
I used to learn particular songs but I've given up on that now because I still didn't think I could 'play' the guitar. What I mean is that if a group of musicians started jamming together, I wouldn't be able to play anything unless they happened to play one of the songs I already knew. What I do now is learn a range of licks and I think of them like extending my vocabulary, with each lick being another word I can use. I then try to improvise over a backing track and try to incorporate the licks I've learned into an improvised solo. I think of this as putting the words (licks) I've learned into sentences (solos). Sometimes it sounds awful and sometimes I stumble across combinations that seem to work really well. Sometimes I use entire licks I've learned strung together and sometimes I just use parts of them. I have no idea if this is the best way of learning to play but the theory sounds fine and initial results sound quite promising.
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#17
Quote by Doadman
I used to learn particular songs but I've given up on that now because I still didn't think I could 'play' the guitar. What I mean is that if a group of musicians started jamming together, I wouldn't be able to play anything unless they happened to play one of the songs I already knew.


Actually, you would be better off, probably, if you still learned songs, especially solos, because in all the solos out there are a klapozillion ideas, phrases, licks, etc. for you to pick up on. When we jam out during a gig my solo improv is one third stuff I picked up from Jimmy Page, Angus Young and a lot of lesser known artists, one third stuff I use from my own solos and my own licks, and one third actual improv using the scales.

Also to play solos by widely differing artists does really help improve on your versatility as a guitarist.

It's like if you start to build a car, you would want to look at how other companies build cars and take the things you like best there and work on that. ^^
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#18
HELL YES! Up another BPM today.

This actually damn well works.

I'm thinking though, sooner or later... am I gonna have to switch my picking to Economy if I really want to start upping the speed? At the moment I use strict down/up/down/up alternate picking (Down on the downbeat, up on the upbeat), even if that means picking from the 'outside' onto another string... IE, I go 5/6/7/8 on the 6th string, then repeat that on the 5th string, but to get from the 6th string, having just used an upstroke, the pick has to go back over the string to reach the 5th... which obviously takes time.... thoughts?
#19
just keep in mind that all you're really doing is getting better at playing chromatic exercises, you're not necessarily improving as a guitarist.
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#20
Quote by Hillz88
HELL YES! Up another BPM today.

This actually damn well works.

I'm thinking though, sooner or later... am I gonna have to switch my picking to Economy if I really want to start upping the speed? At the moment I use strict down/up/down/up alternate picking (Down on the downbeat, up on the upbeat), even if that means picking from the 'outside' onto another string... IE, I go 5/6/7/8 on the 6th string, then repeat that on the 5th string, but to get from the 6th string, having just used an upstroke, the pick has to go back over the string to reach the 5th... which obviously takes time.... thoughts?

whatever feels more comfortable to you.
#21
Yeah, this is a really good question, I've found myself in that predicament many times.

I've found that playing with friends will give you a good perspective on what techniques or styles you'd like to add to your arsenal. Even listening to music and getting inspired can help improve your outlook on being a musician, make you think about song structure in a different way or how to map out a new progression. Sometimes trudging through a difficult piece though, will help your technique in the end, then you can play it for fun once you've mastered it.
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