#1
When you print off a ab to go and learn, the sensible thing to do would be not just to learn it but know what chords are used, key and stuff. How do you tell what chord it is when it just shows you the tab? (I know how to work out key) but, how do you work out if you are given a chord on tab, how do you work out what chord it is?

EDIT: Okay, ignore that load of old bollocks, when you used to learn songs from tab or if you still do, did you learn the song ASAP and not bother working the chords out, or working them all out, then palying it and why? What do you think I should do when learning?
Last edited by TonalPerfection at Feb 19, 2009,
#4
You need to know theory. A basic chord has a combination of at least three notes, usually the root, a fifth and a third. If you can work out the dominant sound you can usually guess the root, unless it's a really compliated jazz chord or something diminished.

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Quote by Zugunruhe
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#5
Usually from the root of the chord shown an example 577555 is an Am chord...I can't explain it well without showing you on guitar sorry lol
#6
If I can use the example above, the root note is A, the fifth is E, then there's another A, a minor third which is a C and then another E on the fifth string(high B string) and another A on the high E string. Sorry if that was confusing.

Because there is a C, which is a minor third in relation to the root note, A, the chord is minor. If you play C# instead it becomes a major chord.

Dunlop 535Q Wah, Ibanez TS-9, EHX LBM
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Quote by Zugunruhe
this was the funniest thing ive seen in the pit for weeks.


^about me
Last edited by Cutlass_253 at Feb 19, 2009,
#7
Quote by Cutlass_253
You need to know theory. A basic chord has a combination of at least three notes, usually the root, a fifth and a third. If you can work out the dominant sound you can usually guess the root, unless it's a really compliated jazz chord or something diminished.

a chord can have as low as two notes
a.k.a. two note power chords
#8
Quote by tukk04
a chord can have as low as two notes
a.k.a. two note power chords


I might be wrong, but I don't think that a "power chord" is technically a chord. I think it's just considered an interval.

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Quote by Zugunruhe
this was the funniest thing ive seen in the pit for weeks.


^about me
#9
Quote by Cutlass_253
I might be wrong, but I don't think that a "power chord" is technically a chord. I think it's just considered an interval.

it is a chord, an example is the E5 chord, even with two of the three notes (just the open e and the b notes) its still tecnically a chord
#10
Quote by tukk04
it is a chord, an example is the E5 chord, even with two of the three notes (just the open e and the b notes) its still tecnically a chord



Yeah I guess you're right, I looked it up, I was thinking of triads, and not chords in general.

Dunlop 535Q Wah, Ibanez TS-9, EHX LBM
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Quote by Zugunruhe
this was the funniest thing ive seen in the pit for weeks.


^about me
#11
Quote by Cutlass_253
Yeah I guess you're right, I looked it up, I was thinking of triads, and not chords in general.

im always right
#12
Quote by Cutlass_253
If I can use the example above, the root note is A, the fifth is E, then there's another A, a minor third which is a C and then another E on the fifth string(high B string) and another A on the high E string. Sorry if that was confusing.

Because there is a C, which is a minor third in relation to the root note, A, the chord is minor. If you play C# instead it becomes a major chord.

Yeah, I know that stuff, working it out manually, what with the 1st 3rd, 5th then working out if major or minor, but I was just wandering if there was a shortcut, oh, and dwhe nyou guys persoanlly learn a song, do you just learn it ASAP, without bothering to work out the chords, or what (if you already know about your chords now, then when you begun)
#13
Quote by Cutlass_253
If I can use the example above, the root note is A, the fifth is E, then there's another A, a minor third which is a C and then another E on the fifth string(high B string) and another A on the high E string. Sorry if that was confusing.

Because there is a C, which is a minor third in relation to the root note, A, the chord is minor. If you play C# instead it becomes a major chord.

Yeah, I know that stuff, working it out manually, what with the 1st 3rd, 5th then working out if major or minor, but I was just wandering if there was a shortcut, oh, and dwhe nyou guys persoanlly learn a song, do you just learn it ASAP, without bothering to work out the chords, or what (if you already know about your chords now, then when you began)
#15
Ok, i dont know any theory really, but basically, as i know it, the deepest note in whatever form/ chord your playing generally determines the chord name, although there are 20-100 diff. variations of every chord, and then slash chords and what not, so to determine exactly what chord your playing is beyond me, but this will help you know at least what area your in.
#16
There are two ways about this TP:

Learn the basic chords, starting with E, G, and A. once you learn the basic chords for the diatonics (A-G, no sharps) you'll be able to handle most commercial music (remember, if it looks different, check to see if it's just a variation first)

Once you get through that, learn intervals, and learn how they apply to basic chords to make new ones.

It won't happen overnight, but I'm glad it doesn't. Music and its instruments should be a labour of love, always.