#1
im currently a sophomore in high school... I have no real interest in doing anything other than music, and I was thinking about what I'm going to do after high school. My grades could be better, and I'm a pretty average student. I know the basics of music theory, but I don't use sheet music because I usually just play by ear or tab and I play rock. By that I mean I havent done much anything jazz or classical. I play guitar and I have figured out the basics of piano and I can read basic sheet music, but not fluently. I'm willing to learn it all if I end up wanting to go for music and I'm going to get started learning more theory, but I want to know a few things such as What do I have to do to get into a college for music?
What is a class like (everyday lesson?, how many people, etc.?)
Is it pretty easy to get a band?
What kind of job can I get with a music degree if all forms of writing music with a band and trying to make it fail?

My main drive to do this is to find some people who are good at and love the kind of music I play (Zep, Beatles) and get a band going. High school kind of sucks when it comes to that, especially when you go to a school where everyone wants to be a lawyer or something and where you cant even get a band practice set up
#2
Theory classes. Piano classes. Ear Training/Aural Skills.

Lessons every week, with a jury at the end of the semester usually. You'll be in a guitar "studio" with peers. Usually you gotta choose classical or jazz for your lessons.

You audition to get in. The school usually won't help you set up a rock band, but you'll meet a lot of people who'll be interested. Sheet music will become neccessary as you'll take theory classes for general music, not guitar theory. If you're a performance major, prepare to become pale from practicing 4-6 hours a day religiously. If you're a comp major, prepare to study theory on a level you can't imagine. If you're an education major, you're gonna have to learn wind instruments and still take lots of general classes. Majoring in music is one of the hardest majors to do in college because of the level of skill needed to merely succeed. A degree in guitar performance will get you almost nowhere except being a studio musician in hollywood or NY. Composition majors will get you writing jingles for commercials, or if you're lucky you'll write a movie soundtrack. Education majors for guitar players are almost useless, since a lot of guitar players can become way more proficient than a professional with almost no formal training.

You're in high school, I'd worry about just finding some close friends to jam with and maybe get an act together. I wouldn't focus on going into professional music until it's time to apply to college.

- Music Major, Euphonium player.
#3
I know what it's like with the struggle to get a band together. I've been trying since I came to university (1.5 years) and still all I've found is another guitarist but our schedules are so different it's almost impossible to have regular jam sessions. Sorry, I can't tell you much about classes or jobs; I'm doing engineering and keeping music as a secondary interest. Good luck, though.
When life gives you lemons, squirt juice in your enemies' eyes.
#4
Majoring in music to get in a band = retarded.

I have a few friends who are music majors. A few like it, a few hate it. I attend the University of North Carolina, and our music program requires 12 credit hours of music history and 15 of music theory, as well as like 14 hours of instruction.

As far as what you can do with that degree, that answer is teach. That's pretty much it.

I know hundreds of people here who are in bands, or have created bands while in college, and not one of them are music majors. Of the music majors I know, none are interested in playing in a band (like a rock band, etc).

I say major in something that will get you a job after college, and perhaps minor in music, or just take a few music classes that interest you. As for finding a band, that will come with knowing the right people

EDIT: I know UNC isn't a music school, but here is the "curriculum" for the music major here, if you're interested.

http://www.unc.edu/ugradbulletin/depts/music.html

It was the only task I would undertake...

I P R O G
...to reap the harvest that was mine


- [ P R O G - H E A D ? ] -
Last edited by MetalGS3SE at Feb 19, 2009,
#5
Quote by MetalGS3SE
I attend the University of North Carolina


lol, I'm at the University of South Carolina.... go cocks.

And I also agree with the music major to get in a band statement. If you love music, don't make it an academic, make it a hobby or interest. If you want to teach music, go to college for music.
#6
Quote by coffeeguy9
Theory classes. Piano classes. Ear Training/Aural Skills.

Lessons every week, with a jury at the end of the semester usually. You'll be in a guitar "studio" with peers. Usually you gotta choose classical or jazz for your lessons.

You audition to get in. The school usually won't help you set up a rock band, but you'll meet a lot of people who'll be interested. Sheet music will become neccessary as you'll take theory classes for general music, not guitar theory. If you're a performance major, prepare to become pale from practicing 4-6 hours a day religiously. If you're a comp major, prepare to study theory on a level you can't imagine. If you're an education major, you're gonna have to learn wind instruments and still take lots of general classes. Majoring in music is one of the hardest majors to do in college because of the level of skill needed to merely succeed. A degree in guitar performance will get you almost nowhere except being a studio musician in hollywood or NY. Composition majors will get you writing jingles for commercials, or if you're lucky you'll write a movie soundtrack. Education majors for guitar players are almost useless, since a lot of guitar players can become way more proficient than a professional with almost no formal training.

You're in high school, I'd worry about just finding some close friends to jam with and maybe get an act together. I wouldn't focus on going into professional music until it's time to apply to college.

- Music Major, Euphonium player.

Ok thanks for the advice, what did you do with your music degree?
#7
Quote by thewantonman
Ok thanks for the advice, what did you do with your music degree?


I'm only a freshman, so I'm still studying. I plan to teach high school bands though.
#8
I agree with coffeeguy9. Majoring in music is one of the hardest things to major in. You have to be proficiant at not just what you play but other instruments as well. All music majors of any sort be it education, performance, comp, or business have to have piano class. Education have to have at least 4 semesters of piano. Plus if your education you have to have several years of music literature and music theory. I'm not sure about other schools but at mine we don't have guitar as a choice. We have strings like violin or violon cello, or bass. (and not a bass guitar) Instrumental majors are like woodwinds or brass and the string players. Majoring in music isn't going to be playing in a rock band and taking classes like how to rock 101. Music classes are learning how to compose music. Or music history such as who wrote what or how to recognize a certain style and what components make it up. And along with this you have to have private lessons on your instrument and be a part of other small ensembles and bands. Being a music major is tough.

- Music Education Major, Clarinet player.
#10
Quote by MetalGS3SE
EDIT: I know UNC isn't a music school, but here is the "curriculum" for the music major here, if you're interested.
I suggest this route, not UNC specifically, though it is a pretty good school, but you have to take general education classes, social science, lab science, humanities, writing, foreign language (usually), arts, math (!), etc to get a music degree (or any degree) from a "normal" college. You can also switch to a different major without much trouble, whereas you would have to transfer from, say, Berklee, to somewhere like UNC, and your music classes, the only classes you'll take, won't transfer as anything but art and general credit; you'll still need most of the general education courses and all of the courses for your new major.