#1
I'm very confused on using chords in improv, if anyone could be kind of enough to elaborate on the subject or direct to me a thread about this, well, that we be just dandy

EDIT: More specifically, As long as chord is in the same key/scale(im not sure which is right) can u use it while improving and is it possible to play each note individually in the chord? And I've heard people say to "arpeggio" a chord, I know what an arpeggio is, but what is to "arpeggio" a chord. I could have misheard so to "arpeggio" a chord could be my mistake/mishearing.
Last edited by 3Dpaper at Feb 19, 2009,
#2
Please ask a specific question. First, it will make you consider what you know and what you don't know, and you probably know information you don't think you know. Second, that question is incredibly vague and impossible to answer in a way that is not equally vague; a vague answer won't help you.
#3
Music Theory... Or play it by ear
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#4
Quote by 3Dpaper
I'm very confused on using chords in improv, if anyone could be kind of enough to elaborate on the subject or direct to me a thread about this, well, that we be just dandy

EDIT: More specifically, As long as chord is in the same key/scale(im not sure which is right) can u use it while improving and is it possible to play each note individually in the chord? And I've heard people say to "arpeggio" a chord, I know what an arpeggio is, but what is to "arpeggio" a chord. I could have misheard so to "arpeggio" a chord could be my mistake/mishearing.



It all depends on who or what you're improvising along with.

To arpeggiate a chord is to play all of its notes individually rather than at the same time. The word "arpeggio" doesn't really function as a verb.
#5
Just think of it this way - chords and scales are exactly the same thing, just arranged differently.

If you play a sequence of notes one after the other that's a scale, play them simultaneously it's a chord. Obviously that's a gross generalisation as there's rules that govern both scale and chord construction, but on a base level that's all there is to it and there's no reason to make it more complicated than it needs to be.

If you're playing in a certain key then it will have certain chords, and also an associated scale - and every chord in that key will be made up of notes from that scale.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Feb 20, 2009,
#6
an arpeggio can imply another chord over a chord.

Take C Major Chord. It's relative minor is Am.

Play an Am arpeggio over a C Major chord, and you will imply another chord over it. You can also use a jazz approach and play higher register triads over it.

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