#1
Hey so I'm playing a progression Dmajor to Gmajor to A major. and if I solo with the relative minor to D major which is B minor. what exactly makes this different then soloing with D major. like should I focus on hitting more B triad notes? which really only is the B note thats any different? I just don't get it. thanks
#2
Few understand this concept at first, but you can't play a Bm scale over a D major progression. If you're playing the notes D E F# G A B C# over a D major progression, regardless of where on the neck you play, the order of the notes you play, the notes with which you start and end your licks, etc. You are playing some kind of D scale over a D major progression, not B. The chord progression determines what you call the scale, and Western music theory names the notes D E F# G A B C# over a D major progression the D major scale, period.
#3
Quote by xmacattack18
Hey so I'm playing a progression Dmajor to Gmajor to A major. and if I solo with the relative minor to D major which is B minor. what exactly makes this different then soloing with D major. like should I focus on hitting more B triad notes? which really only is the B note thats any different? I just don't get it. thanks


You don't have to do anything different. it will just sound like D Major. You can use your ears to decide which notes to hit.
#6
Quote by xmacattack18
bang charlotte
If you're around the UG much, you're going to see my username a lot. Let me just clarify that it has one T and is one word; it should be capitalized, too. Sue is fine, though, considering it's my name.

Quote by GezzyDiversion
Just play the D major scale (basically B minor pentatonic)
Please read my first post in the thread.
#10
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Few understand this concept at first, but you can't play a Bm scale over a D major progression. If you're playing the notes D E F# G A B C# over a D major progression, regardless of where on the neck you play, the order of the notes you play, the notes with which you start and end your licks, etc. You are playing some kind of D scale over a D major progression, not B. The chord progression determines what you call the scale, and Western music theory names the notes D E F# G A B C# over a D major progression the D major scale, period.


This is correct.

Just re-emphasizing what was said about not having to start or end on a D note, when playing over a D major chord. A lot of people forget that.
#11
Quote by bangoodcharlote
Few understand this concept at first, but you can't play a Bm scale over a D major progression. If you're playing the notes D E F# G A B C# over a D major progression, regardless of where on the neck you play, the order of the notes you play, the notes with which you start and end your licks, etc. You are playing some kind of D scale over a D major progression, not B. The chord progression determines what you call the scale, and Western music theory names the notes D E F# G A B C# over a D major progression the D major scale, period.


Well you certainly can play a B minor scale over a D Major progression, it's just that you will hear it as D Major. You hear the notes based on the harmonic context. I agree though, that it's more appropriate to refer to it as D Major, and not B minor.

TS: there is not need to emphasize any particular notes. Use your ears to decide what sounds good or not. It would be good for you to study melodies, and to understand the difference between chord tones and non-chord tones, but don't play by rules, play by ear. If it sounds good to you, it in all likely hood will be consistent with common practice and will be considered "theoretically correct".
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 19, 2009,
#12
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well you certainly can play a B minor scale over a D Major progression
How? I don't see how you can play the Bm scale but not refer to it as the D major scale. Why wouldn't it be D major? Do you mean that one would play what is typically considered a Bm scale based on scale fingering on the guitar?
#13
Quote by bangoodcharlote
How? I don't see how you can play the Bm scale but not refer to it as the D major scale. Why wouldn't it be D major? Do you mean that one would play what is typically considered a Bm scale based on scale fingering on the guitar?


I said you could PLAY it over a D Major progression, and you can. No, I wasn't referring to the shape (and yes I know why you asked that lol), though a person that doesn't know the Major shape, certainly could utilize the familiar minor or minor pentatonic shape.

Look, I know what you were trying to say (regarding what you should call it), and I agree (read my post) except you are wrong when you say that "you CAN'T play a B minor scale over a D Major progression".... that is simply not true.

The part of my post you forgot to quote:
Quote by GuitarMunky
it's more appropriate to refer to it as D Major, and not B minor.




Quote by Axe720
not having to start or end on a D note, when playing over a D major chord.


Right.

As an exercise, It's good to practice playing the chord tones to become familiar with where they are, and what they sound like, but when it comes down to making music you have to get past that and use your ears.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 19, 2009,