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#1
i just generally want to know if its really worth learning every chord thats listed on my chord chart- ive familiarised my self with all the important ones ie major and minor and if course ive looked into 6th 7ths and a few suspended chords but i mainly play rock and metal so i mainly focus on power chords and i just use my chord chart as a reference for when its needed but i cant help thinking should i learn all the others
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#3
Best thing to do is start learning how to make chords and in doing so be able to quickly know chords on the fretboard.

There isn't really a need to learn ALL chords but a fair knowledge of most of them and how they work is best.

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#5
learn the ones that are common in your genre of playing
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#6
You actually only need to memorize the shapes, not the chords themselves.
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#7
If you're done with it, pass it here; I'm learning Jazz and I need all the chords I can get!
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#8
I agree with a few others, learn the chord shapes. If you can play an Am7 barre chord, then you already know how to play a Fm7 barre chord. It's all about shapes. Then later, you can go back and learn what notes are in the chord.
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#9
I suggest you learn the theory behind that stuff, and then you'll be able to make them up yourself.
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#10
You should have an idea about the shapes.
It would also help to know the notes in the chords, and the formula for the chords, so that you can form them even if you don't know what they would look like.
#11
Best thing to do is start learning how to make chords and in doing so be able to quickly know chords on the fretboard.


fair enough ive got to grips with where all the notes are on the fretboard and what chords they make so im not really a newbie and thats not a problem it was just a general question really

and

If you're done with it, pass it here; I'm learning Jazz and I need all the chords I can get!


unlucky mate

anyway im pretty accomplished as far as shapes go so thx for advice guys
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Last edited by liam9564 at Feb 20, 2009,
#12
I learned the 7 basic chords, I learned 7ths and so on during learning songs that require them
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#14
Quote by liam9564
i just generally want to know if its really worth learning every chord thats listed on my chord chart- ive familiarised my self with all the important ones ie major and minor and if course ive looked into 6th 7ths and a few suspended chords but i mainly play rock and metal so i mainly focus on power chords and i just use my chord chart as a reference for when its needed but i cant help thinking should i learn all the others


One of the biggest mistakes people make is to get one of those big chord charts, and then try to learn every single chord on there. it's not that you shouldn't learn the chords, it's just that you need to learn them in context. Find a song you like, learn how to play it, and everything that's involved. ( like all of the chords in the song). then move on to another song. Some of the chords may be the same, which will reinforce what you've already learned, and there will probably be some new chords so you will be expanding as well.

that being said, if you feel like exploring to see what those chords sound like, it can't hurt you. but if you try to memorize every chord on that chart, you're not likely to actually remember them all in a way that's useful.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 20, 2009,
#15
If you want to limit yourself then you don't need to learn them. If you want to be better as a musician, then learn them all.
#16
^ I would say that the person that knows five or six chords, and can apply them is less limited than the person that trys to learn 100 chords from some chord chart, but doesn't understanding the context in which those chords could be applied.

its like if you wanted to learn the English language. do you think trying to memorize every word in the dictionary would be a useful endeavor? probably not. you might pick up a few new words here and there, but unless you're an incredibly gifted memorizer, or are autistic or something, you're just not going to remember more than a fraction of what you spent your time studying. and even if you do remember every word ( which you probably won't), you still won't have learned the language in a way that allows you to speak to others, because you haven't learned it in context.

Information that you can apply, stays with you and therefore useful information.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 20, 2009,
#17
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ I would say that the person that knows five or six chords, and can apply them is less limited than the person that trys to learn 100 chords from some chord chart, but doesn't understanding the context in which those chords could be applied.

its like if you wanted to learn the English language. do you think trying to memorize every word in the dictionary would be a useful endeavor? probably not. you might pick up a few new words here and there, but unless you're incredibly gifted memorizer, or are autistic or something, you're just not going to remember more than a fraction of what you spent your time studying.

Information that you can apply, stays with you and therefore useful information.


I see what you are saying, and I agree. You should learn how to use them aside from just playing. However I still believe the more chords you know the more options you have when writing songs.
#18
Quote by blueriver
I see what you are saying, and I agree. You should learn how to use them aside from just playing. However I still believe the more chords you know the more options you have when writing songs.


Certainly the more you know, the more you have to work with. it's just a matter of how you go about learning. To me those big chord charts, and scale charts, are the wrong way to go. They do look impressive on a poster though. which is appealing to those that are looking to impress.


Learn, but learn in a realistic, useful way.

if you focus on music, and learn all of the things involved. You'll encounter all of those chords in due time, and in a context that's meaningful.

anyway, I do agree with you that learning more chords can be a good thing. I just hates to see someone go the route that I've seen so many people go before, and achieve the same result......... lots of time spent, and practically nothing learned. It's just not a realistic, or useful way to go about learning chords.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 20, 2009,
#19
Umm...I don't think it's possible to learn every single chord there is.
You should learn how to build chords, honestly.
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#21
Imo, learning where notes are on the fretboard (relative to a root note, at least) and learning the intervals in various chord types is the way to go.

For example, taking a CM7 chord, you know the intervals for a (dominant) 7th chord are 1, M3, 5 and m7.

You also know a basic C major triad:
e-0
B-1
G-0
D-2
A-3
E-x

So now, with this in mind, you recall that a minor 7th in C is Bb, or a major 2nd down from the root note (take your pick, I usually prefer to go with where things are relative to the basic triad chords). This is the only interval you're changing from a basic triad, but for more complex chords (7add9s, etc) you just do the same process several times.

Since you know that 4th fret on the G string is B, 3rd fret is Bb, so you add that in. Or by relative intervals, 5th fret is the root note, so a major 2nd down is the minor 7th... Stick this on top of the original chord, and...

C7 is
e-0
B-1
G-3
D-2
A-3
E-x
#22
Rock music is a wide genre, there is a huge spectrum of chords used. If you are Blink 182 kind of rock (or pop-rock or whatever) then all you really need is power chords. However, the Led Zeppelin/Pink Floyd kind of stuff uses very advanced chords.
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#23
yeah, i just wanna add my two cents...

don't think of advanced chords as non-rock chords. rock is how you play it, not so much what is played.

also, if you learn about intervals and how they are used construct chords, you can just form any chord you want by finding it's intervals within a the same few frets.
#24
You don't even need to use reach appropriate chords once you get into the realm of open strings and alternate tunings.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#26
Quote by Freepower
It's certainly not possible to play every possible chord, full stop. Unless you have an infinitely large orchestra with etc etc...

But surely the most different notes you could have in a chord would be 12, so you would only need a maximum of 12 instruments to play all possible chords (just not all the voicings).
#27
as mentioned previously the best thing imo that you can do is learn how to construct chords and learn how they are used. an EVEN BETTER thing to do is learn about voice leading so you can use some crazy funky chords and know how they fit together and when you have one crazy chord you can hear what it wants to go to next.
#28
If you're playing metal, you'll probably never play, say a Major13 chord. But I suggest that you experiment with different chords and see what they sound like. You might find some that you didn't expect to sound cool. ex. 7#9, 6/9, add9, minor7, minor9.
Sometimes a chord might sound wierd by itself. But when you put the right chord in front of it and the right one after it, you might come up a really different sounding progression.

Here's an example of how this happend for me. I was playing around with a D minor Major7 chord. By itself, it almost sounds like a mistake. And if you play it distorted, it sounds awful. But I messed around with it for a while and came up with this progression;
Dm - DmM7 - Dm7 - G9 - Bbadd9 - Cadd9 - F5 - D5. It reminds me a really heavy Beatles type progression.
So experiment. Use your ears.
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#29
Quote by GuitarMunky
Certainly the more you know, the more you have to work with. it's just a matter of how you go about learning. To me those big chord charts, and scale charts, are the wrong way to go. They do look impressive on a poster though. which is appealing to those that are looking to impress.


Learn, but learn in a realistic, useful way.

if you focus on music, and learn all of the things involved. You'll encounter all of those chords in due time, and in a context that's meaningful.

anyway, I do agree with you that learning more chords can be a good thing. I just hates to see someone go the route that I've seen so many people go before, and achieve the same result......... lots of time spent, and practically nothing learned. It's just not a realistic, or useful way to go about learning chords.


Learning chords in context is obviously a good thing but I also think its great to learn new chords and just experiment with them. Try fitting them into progressions you already know and get used to the sound, I have personally came up with very interesting progressions by doing this.
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#30
Quote by liam9564
i just generally want to know if its really worth learning every chord thats listed on my chord chart- ive familiarised my self with all the important ones ie major and minor and if course ive looked into 6th 7ths and a few suspended chords but i mainly play rock and metal so i mainly focus on power chords and i just use my chord chart as a reference for when its needed but i cant help thinking should i learn all the others

If you know the formulas for the 4 basic triads, and intervals, and where these intervals lie on the fretboard, you already have the foundation to play every chord, imaginable, covered.
#31
learn theory, then you can make the chords without learning them all individually
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#32
^
have allready done a fair bit

Rock music is a wide genre, there is a huge spectrum of chords used. If you are Blink 182 kind of rock (or pop-rock or whatever) then all you really need is power chords. However, the Led Zeppelin/Pink Floyd kind of stuff uses very advanced chords
.

to be more specific i play stuff like
pantera,black sabbath and megadeth,a bit of dream theater

and im well aware that the first 3 of those mostly use standard power chords for rhythm sections but dream theater tend to use alot of extensions and diminished chords
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#33
The chord name contains all of the information you need. You should be able to construct any chord, anywhere on the fretboard, in any inversion.\

^ I would say that the person that knows five or six chords, and can apply them is less limited than the person that trys to learn 100 chords from some chord chart, but doesn't understanding the context in which those chords could be applied.


Fortunately, no one, anywhere, advocated such a thing, making this statement true but entirely irrelevant. Why do you constantly assume that anyone who advocates learning theory is simultaneously advocating that the individual completely ignore its application?

Led Zeppelin/Pink Floyd kind of stuff uses very advanced chords


Que?
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Last edited by Archeo Avis at Feb 25, 2009,
#34
Quote by radiantmoon
Learning chords in context is obviously a good thing but I also think its great to learn new chords and just experiment with them. Try fitting them into progressions you already know and get used to the sound, I have personally came up with very interesting progressions by doing this.


+1

if you're suggesting looking at a chart and randomly trying chords, then putting them in the context and using your ears to make sense in that context..... yeah, you could do that.

I think anything that you learned regardless of how you learned it is of value. Still, I'm not a fan of those big chord chart/ scale chart posters for reasons already mentioned, and the fact that they are quite overwhelming. When I'm teaching someone, I prefer approach it in a more focused way. give them a few chords, and then present them within a context..... then build from there.

Quote by Archeo Avis


Fortunately, no one, anywhere, advocated such a thing, making this statement true but entirely irrelevant. Why do you constantly assume that anyone who advocates learning theory is simultaneously advocating that the individual completely ignore its application?


Really?

Quote by blueriver
If you want to limit yourself then you don't need to learn them. If you want to be better as a musician, then learn them all.



Archeo, why don't you read the post that I was replying to, before making accusations. It simply says that if you don't learn them all you will be limited, and that if you do learn them all you will be a better musician. there is nothing here that advocates learning theory, and there's nothing here about context/application.

you're assertion that I " constantly assume that anyone who advocates learning theory is simultaneously advocating that the individual completely ignore its application" is completely false.
I simply read the post and reply accordingly. I stand by my reply to this post as well.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 25, 2009,
#35
Learning how chords are formed and how they're used is far more important than attempting to memorize a bunch of them.
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#36
If you notice on the chart that most of those chords look exactly the same just different frets, you already know most of them. At least all the chord chars Ive ever seen anyway.

I mean really, an A minor add9 played at open A is the same as dminoradd9 at the 5 fret. Or an eminor7add9 at the 7th fret is the same as bminor7add9 at the second fret.

Shapes my friend. Thats what matters. Once you get your shapes down, and know the notes and stuff, youll be able to build your own new chords that eddie van halen already built years ago.

EDIT- Its impossible to learn EVERY SINGLE CHORD out there. So dont try to stuff something into your brain that cannot be done. But do try to learn as many as possible.
Last edited by bastratard at Feb 26, 2009,
#37
lots of good stuff in here. Basically I would say that if you can't tell the difference between two voicings or inversions then you shouldn't learn them! (sonically tell the difference of course). Once you get to a place where you want your changes to flow better, or are looking for unique, subtle sounds/colors in chords then you should learn some more, which should be obvious. Let the music be your guide.
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#39
I read somewhere that there are over 14,000 playable chords. So good luck.
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#40
Quote by GuitarMunky
+1

if you're suggesting looking at a chart and randomly trying chords, then putting them in the context and using your ears to make sense in that context..... yeah, you could do that.

I think anything that you learned regardless of how you learned it is of value. Still, I'm not a fan of those big chord chart/ scale chart posters for reasons already mentioned, and the fact that they are quite overwhelming. When I'm teaching someone, I prefer approach it in a more focused way. give them a few chords, and then present them within a context..... then build from there.


Really?


Archeo, why don't you read the post that I was replying to, before making accusations. It simply says that if you don't learn them all you will be limited, and that if you do learn them all you will be a better musician. there is nothing here that advocates learning theory, and there's nothing here about context/application.

you're assertion that I " constantly assume that anyone who advocates learning theory is simultaneously advocating that the individual completely ignore its application" is completely false.
I simply read the post and reply accordingly. I stand by my reply to this post as well.
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