#1
I know how to do it; using intervals and the Major 3rd + minor 3rd = major chord, etc... way. My problem is more finding those notes near each other.

EXAMPLE (starting from the 5th fret, using letter names):


|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|
|-E-|-F-|---|-G-|---|
|-C-|---|-D-|Eb-|---|
|-G-|---|-A-|Bb-|---|
|-D-|---|-E-|-F-|---|
|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|


Say we were constructing a basic C Major triad. I don't really care about what inversion. The notes are C, E, G.


|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|
|-E-|-F-|---|-G-|---|
|-C-|---|-D-|Eb-|---|
|-G-|---|-A-|Bb-|---|
|-D-|---|-E-|-F-|---|
|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|


Just because these notes are here, it doesn't neccassarily mean it is easy to get your fingers in those positions, etc...... so waht to do?
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#2
There are many different ways to voice each chord. You won't always be able to play them root-third-fifth in an easy way. Sometimes you will catch chords using inversions, sometimes you'll have two roots, two fifths, two thirds, etc. Just make sure all three of the triad pitches are included in the chord, even if you have to do some stretches to do so.
#3
Quote by Axe720
There are many different ways to voice each chord. You won't always be able to play them root-third-fifth in an easy way. Sometimes you will catch chords using inversions, sometimes you'll have two roots, two fifths, two thirds, etc. Just make sure all three of the triad pitches are included in the chord, even if you have to do some stretches to do so.


and when you expand to some form of 7th chords lol? it gets even more difficult. say, in the above example, to include the B or Bb in the chord, while trying to get the triad voicing as well.
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#4
Usually if you're expanding out to beyond the seventh or even with the seventh, you leave out the fifth of the chord, because it's too consonant with the tonic note.

Best thing I can suggest is look at chords you already know, basic chords like open G major and open C major can be played all around the neck quite easily, not as easily as A-shaped and E-shaped barre chords granted, but they are good examples.
#5
Quote by st.stephen
Usually if you're expanding out to beyond the seventh or even with the seventh, you leave out the fifth of the chord, because it's too consonant with the tonic note.

Best thing I can suggest is look at chords you already know, basic chords like open G major and open C major can be played all around the neck quite easily, not as easily as A-shaped and E-shaped barre chords granted, but they are good examples.


that helped, so I only have to include the notes that affect the overall tonality (tonic, 3rds for major and minor, 7ths for whatever...)

and yeah, I do move up open position chords like that, only problem is sometimes its nearly impossible to make them major/minor. example being c major.
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#6
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
that helped, so I only have to include the notes that affect the overall tonality (tonic, 3rds for major and minor, 7ths for whatever...)

and yeah, I do move up open position chords like that, only problem is sometimes its nearly impossible to make them major/minor. example being c major.

How is it hard for Cmaj?
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#7
Quote by Froboarder
How is it hard for Cmaj?


i think he means making the c major shape minor


TS, this is kind of a trial and error thing, you get better at it the more you do it.

for basic chord shapes need the first, third, and fifth. the your lowest note should be you ! and then after that just make sure you get the 3rd and 5th in there. doesn't really matter about order after that.

And don't be scared to melt the positions together, the notes don't need to all be from the same position.

but really, major and minor chords aren't all that difficult if you know your open shapes, cuz most of the usual voicings are based on those.
#8
Cmaj 01023x
Cmin x1013x
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#9
Quote by Froboarder
Cmaj 01023x
Cmin x1013x


first, you got your strings backwards. second, the barchord shape, but moved up the neck. it's a little difficult to get your pinky over there without muting the wrong strings
#10
Quote by The4thHorsemen
first, you got your strings backwards. second, the barchord shape, but moved up the neck. it's a little difficult to get your pinky over there without muting the wrong strings

I don't think I got the strings backward. 1st string=high E=first number in the sequence.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#11
Quote by Froboarder
I don't think I got the strings backward. 1st string=high E=first number in the sequence.


well, most of the time i've seen people tab out chords horizontally like that, i believe the big string (low e) comes first. like X32010. and since people spell out tunings like this too that makes sense, like EADGBE.

but it think we all knew what you meant
#12
Quote by The4thHorsemen
well, most of the time i've seen people tab out chords horizontally like that, i believe the big string (low e) comes first. like X32010. and since people spell out tunings like this too that makes sense, like EADGBE.

but it think we all knew what you meant

Really? I always see it the way I put it, but whatevs.
I'm still confused as to what TS is asking though.
I'm that dude with the fro.
Quote by angus fan16
Long story short, a whale flew out of the ocean, landed next to me and shot like a wall of water straight into my face.
#13
Quote by Froboarder
Really? I always see it the way I put it, but whatevs.
I'm still confused as to what TS is asking though.


from what I understand he's fine with finding the notes, but when he tries to make up a new voicing he's having trouble getting it to fit together in a way he can play it.
#14
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
Say we were constructing a basic C Major triad. I don't really care about what inversion. The notes are C, E, G.


|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|
|-E-|-F-|---|-G-|---|
|-C-|---|-D-|Eb-|---|
|-G-|---|-A-|Bb-|---|
|-D-|---|-E-|-F-|---|
|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|


Just because these notes are here, it doesn't neccassarily mean it is easy to get your fingers in those positions, etc...... so waht to do?

Barr the notes on the fifth fret with your index finger.

Then you can either use your pinky on the bass C and ring finger on the E and just not play the high E string.

Or use your ring finger on the bass C and the middle finger on the E with your pinky on the high C.
Si
#15
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
I know how to do it; using intervals and the Major 3rd + minor 3rd = major chord, etc... way. My problem is more finding those notes near each other.

EXAMPLE (starting from the 5th fret, using letter names):


|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|
|-E-|-F-|---|-G-|---|
|-C-|---|-D-|Eb-|---|
|-G-|---|-A-|Bb-|---|
|-D-|---|-E-|-F-|---|
|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|


Say we were constructing a basic C Major triad. I don't really care about what inversion. The notes are C, E, G.


|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|
|-E-|-F-|---|-G-|---|
|-C-|---|-D-|Eb-|---|
|-G-|---|-A-|Bb-|---|
|-D-|---|-E-|-F-|---|
|-A-|---|-B-|-C-|---|


Just because these notes are here, it doesn't neccassarily mean it is easy to get your fingers in those positions, etc...... so waht to do?

You're right, it's not easy, so play the chord somewhere else - that's not the only place those notes appear.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#16
I know, that was an example. But with the stretching to get all the notes, and gettinga ll the notes into the chord itself, its still relatively difficult where ever you go on the fretboard. The4thHorsemen, you got the basic idea of what i was asking. I guess im just gonna have to mess around a bit more.
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#17
A while back, I was spending some time trying to come up with some new chord voicings, and I created this interval map with the hopes of triggering some new ideas.
You can certainly do this without a visual aid, but I found that looking at this inspired me to reach for new shapes and inversions that I never thought of before. Maybe it will help.

#18
Metalhead: I'm working on a theory textbook of sorts for the forum. Would you mind if I used that interval map? (You'd receive credit, obviously)
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#19
I originally posted this for sweeping, but it's INCREDIBLY useful for visualizing and playing chord triads anywhere on the neck:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=813959

With those 3 diagonals you can play any triad, in any inversion, anywhere you happen to be on the neck. If you play around with this long enough you might discover playing chords anywhere you happen to be on the neck isn't as hard as you might have thought.

The reason this particular organization -- in diagonals -- works out so nicely is because it reflects a particular geometry of the fretboard. Basically if you went in steps of either major or minor 3rds from one string to the next, you'd basically being going in diagonals in these general directions. Chords are built on 3rds, so the triads themselves follow these general directions. Because of that, triads along the diagonals are always GUARANTEED to be easily frettable for a chord.

This is just the core of the system. Along these diagonal lines you'll always get the 1-3-5. When you get a real sense for which degree is which, it becomes relatively straightforward to extend/alter the triad.

The "interval map" posted above is a nice reference, but it doesn't really organize anything enough to keep in your head real time without a lot of work. I've been able to build some chord voicings "on the fly" that I never thought about before, because I've practiced the diagonals quite a bit.
Last edited by edg at Feb 22, 2009,
#20
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
I know, that was an example. But with the stretching to get all the notes, and gettinga ll the notes into the chord itself, its still relatively difficult where ever you go on the fretboard. The4thHorsemen, you got the basic idea of what i was asking. I guess im just gonna have to mess around a bit more.

Not really, there's plenty of places where you can play a C major triad easily.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#21
Quote by Archeo Avis
Metalhead: I'm working on a theory textbook of sorts for the forum. Would you mind if I used that interval map? (You'd receive credit, obviously)



Sure man, I don't mind.