#1
Yo,
I've searched the forums and can't find any solutions to this. On my Squier strat I get a hum when I touch the strings, as opposed to when I'm not touching the strings. This leads me to believe it's not a grounding problem as in most cases of hum where the hum goes away when you touch the strings.
Any suggestions?
#2
Actually, it prolly IS a grounding problem. When you touch the strings, the hum is SUPPOSED to go away. That's how the wiring works. Your body becomes a shield.

In your case, your body is becomming an antenna. Recheck all your solder joints. Swap amps and cables, etc. Get the obvious out of the way first.
#3
Ah I see. Thanks man.
Yeah I've ruled out cable and amp. Could it have anything to do with not using coaxial wire from the tone pot to the output jack? It's a guitar which I haven't played in ages and I can't remember if the hum started before or after I replaced the broken co-ax wire to the output jack with two bits of normal wire.
#4
My son had the same problem on a highly upgraded FENDER strat standard.I gave up and sent it to the repair shop after finding no grounding problems.It happened all at once after playing it a few weeks after some upgrades were done.Come to find out someone had installed a stereo input jack instead of a mono input jack.we had the input jack changed out and it seems to work (for now,we only had it back a few days)
#5
if other guitars work through the amp, it must be your guitar... if that is the case, and assuming it is indeed a mono jack, try reversing the hot and ground at the output jack... or input jack, whatever you wish to call it... if other guitars do the same in your amp, the get the amp fixed... grounding issues in an amp can be a real p.i.t.a... good luck...
master the beginner's mind
#6
Quote by GelDouche
Ah I see. Thanks man.
Yeah I've ruled out cable and amp. Could it have anything to do with not using coaxial wire from the tone pot to the output jack? It's a guitar which I haven't played in ages and I can't remember if the hum started before or after I replaced the broken co-ax wire to the output jack with two bits of normal wire.

The exterior of the coax pair acts as shield, in fact that is what it is termed. If you replaced it with two separate conductors the wire is unshielded over that length and open to interference. It may be the cause of noise depending on conductor length and on whether you may also have unintentionally created a "ground loop" with your repair.
edited for spelling
Last edited by R.Christie at Feb 22, 2009,