#1
what are some things that can be done to adjust the tone of an acoustic guitar?
#2
buy a better acoustic guitar.
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#3
Change out your strings for thicker or thinner ones for a darker or brighter tone
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#5
Strings vary the most, absolutely. You can also try having a bone saddle made, if yours is plastic. Ivory, if you can find, will work too. The action can also be changed. Put shims under the bridge to raise the strings, provided the action isn't already pretty high, and you can get better tone and volume; of course, that sacrifices ease of playing a bit.
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#7
Strings make the biggest difference, as said earlier. Another thing you can do that doesn't require changing anything, and helps when you need to change tones when you change songs is where you strum or pick. Picking closer to the saddle will get a shorter more staccato, but thinner sound, where as picking on the 12th fret when you aren't holding down the string on any fret will give you a sound with so much tone it almost sounds electronic....you can move between these extremes to find what you want.

But yeah, strings.
#8
Nut, pin and saddle material all make a difference (though nut material really only changes the sound of open strings, but better material does have other benefits). Plus strings like they already said, and technique can make much bigger changes than you might expect.
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#9
And let's not forget the almighty humidity of the wood of the guitar itself. A dried out guitar will sound really tinny and thin while an overly humidified one will tend to sound muffled and dull. The better the quality of the wood, the more critical this becomes for the overall tone(and health) of the guitar.
#10
Quote by millerdrr
Strings vary the most, absolutely. You can also try having a bone saddle made, if yours is plastic. Ivory, if you can find, will work too. The action can also be changed. Put shims under the bridge to raise the strings, provided the action isn't already pretty high, and you can get better tone and volume; of course, that sacrifices ease of playing a bit.

This
Quote by ReChord
Strings make the biggest difference, as said earlier. Another thing you can do that doesn't require changing anything, and helps when you need to change tones when you change songs is where you strum or pick. Picking closer to the saddle will get a shorter more staccato, but thinner sound, where as picking on the 12th fret when you aren't holding down the string on any fret will give you a sound with so much tone it almost sounds electronic....you can move between these extremes to find what you want.

But yeah, strings.

This
Quote by LeftyDave
And let's not forget the almighty humidity of the wood of the guitar itself. A dried out guitar will sound really tinny and thin while an overly humidified one will tend to sound muffled and dull. The better the quality of the wood, the more critical this becomes for the overall tone(and health) of the guitar.

And this
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