#1
Well I got an electric guiatar and I've been wanting to learn to play but I don't want to do lessons. Whats the easiest way I can learn and can anyone help me?
Thanks
~Alex
#2
Find a lesson book and teach yourself out of it, learn scales.

Eventually move onto learning basic songs when you've got it down
#4
i just looked up tabs of my favorite songs that i thought sounded easy enough, learned what i could, practiced it over and over again, then went on to another song, and just kinna built up skill. but hey, thats just what i did
#5
Quote by tetsusiega2
i just looked up tabs of my favorite songs that i thought sounded easy enough, learned what i could, practiced it over and over again, then went on to another song, and just kinna built up skill. but hey, thats just what i did


Same, might take a little longer this way , but its more fun
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#6
Quote by tetsusiega2
i just looked up tabs of my favorite songs that i thought sounded easy enough, learned what i could, practiced it over and over again, then went on to another song, and just kinna built up skill. but hey, thats just what i did

yah for sure. depending on the music you like, of course.. i started with nirvana and green day, and moved my way up to more difficult bands to play
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#7
Quote by tetsusiega2
i just looked up tabs of my favorite songs that i thought sounded easy enough, learned what i could, practiced it over and over again, then went on to another song, and just kinna built up skill. but hey, thats just what i did


Do this but after you have learned a decent amount of songs (not necessarily the whole song either just main parts) then learn your basic scales, minor and major pentatonic, major, minor, and harmonic minor, then learn to understand the chords in the scale, then repeat but obviously learn different scales and different songs.
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#8
Get one of those beginner books that give you an idea of technique for holding a guitar properly etc. Then just pick out some easy guitar tabs and start playing. That's what I did, along with watching vid's of Jimi Hendrix for inspiration.... not quite up to his standard yet though!!
#9
Quote by BTSleadguitar
Do this but after you have learned a decent amount of songs (not necessarily the whole song either just main parts) then learn your basic scales, minor and major pentatonic, major, minor, and harmonic minor, then learn to understand the chords in the scale, then repeat but obviously learn different scales and different songs.

ill tell ya those scales are excellent exercise for the fingers and speed and there of great value at the same time.......this is exactly what I'm doing now
be patient and just practice anything and everything...but then again what do i know
#12
I found Lick Library DVD tutorials to be very good. I wish I'd found them earlier as I'd have saved a fortune on lessons. For £20 I get more in one DVD than I could get in 20 lessons.
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#13
i found did lessons on youtube and got freinds to show me some stuff. aswell as learning songs, getting gradually more advanced
#14
I had a Fender beginner DVD (Great buy, BTW) that taught me basic chords and how to solo with the Pentatonic Minor scale. The basics I learned on that DVD were more helpful than anything I've used. From there I just learned songs with tabs, and about 2 years later, I was satisfied with my playing skills.
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#15
Personally i'd advise lessons from a good teacher. Even if it is only for a couple of months ,that is enough to give to a solid base on which to build on your own. Odds are you won't learn bad habits that will hinder your playing later. For every one person that is self taught and achieve thier goals there are 100's without a good ear and they give up on the guitar.
If you're on a budget ,go get your libraby card and check them out for DVD's and books to learn. They probably have a good selection and at no cost unless you're late returning them.
#16
I selftaught myself by just learning how to play as much songs as I can (if something sounded easy, I looked up the tabs for it, if I couldn't find it then I tried to tab it out by ear), then played along to the CDs, and also composed my own songs (w/ guitar pro) after learning some music theory and scales, and played along to that.

A lot of people seem to advise against this, but it's just how I learned.
#17
That's how I did it. Memorize the fret board first. I think the advantage I had was a record player! I would listen to a song over and over and find the notes on the neck, then try and play along with the song. When it would be hard to play a certain riff, I would turn off the recording and practice that groove until I was comfortable with the speed and sound of it. I would find a song and divide the song into four sections. And finding the most difficult section, I would start with that first. Break it down into however many sections you need to make it make sense. Then buy yourself a metronome and practice with that, each song has a certain amount of beats per minute. This is the boring part, the part you must do...SCALES. You'll find alot of newbie musicians quit after awhile because they practice an hour or a week or a month and notice NO results. Would I rather go to the bar, hang out with the old lady or practice?? Get your priorities in line. I always find it sad when I'm at a gig and someone walks up to me and says, "Yeah, I tried to play the bass, but I didn't have the time." Bottom line, you got time to catch a buzz, watch a baseball game, shoot the breeze with your friends???? You have time to practice. Finding time to practice NEVER ends, even after you have "mastered" your instrument (NO ONE EVER BECOMES THAT GOOD.) Once you're good enough to join a band, you'll be hit with all different ideas, styles, approaches. This is good, listen and learn..forget your ego, it gets in the way. Try and find players that are just as dedicated and loyal as yourself. Depends on your goals too. Do you just want to play for the fun of it? Do you want to play out occasionally, nothing big? Do you want to play professionally? It's up to you, but it all starts with PRACTICE. Good luck, send me a free CD once you make it big!! My gear: Tobias Growler, Ernie Ball Stingray, 1951 reissue Fender, Fender P-bass, Fender J bass, Washburn ABT force bass, Epiphone T-Bird, Epi Les Paul special, Peavey BXP. Peavey 700 watt fire series head, 4x10 and 1x15 cab. Nady wireless. I'm still not happy with my sound.
Last edited by dustybass at Feb 22, 2009,
#18
Quote by RATTU
Get one of those beginner books that give you an idea of technique for holding a guitar properly etc. Then just pick out some easy guitar tabs and start playing. That's what I did, along with watching vid's of Jimi Hendrix for inspiration.... not quite up to his standard yet though!!


Don't feel bad, not many if any are as good as old Lefty. I agree, if it inspires you, go with it. Good idea.