#1
I got my first acoustic 2 weeks ago (Yamaha FG700s) and the more I have been playing it the more this is bothering me. I would take it to a guitar shop and ask them about it but the possible embarrassment of them telling me I just suck isn't worth the risk before I give it a shot over the anonymous internet. Anyways when I am playing certain chords with the third fret down on the e and B strings this annoying ringing sounds resonates throughout. I tune it before every time I play and use the thinnest pick I could find. I am just crazy and not strumming correctly? Would new strings help? Or is something wrong with the guitar? Here is a short video...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zy8NRLcOLMg
#2
shake the headstock, do you hear something rattling? if so, one of the tuners washers is loose...was loose on my fg730, fixed easily though, if not, idk, and if you can't fix it/ make it sound like you want, take it back, and get something you want and will continue ot playl.
Gear:
Alvarez Classical Guitar(don't know much about it).
Yamaha FG730S
Agile AL-2000 Black Cherry
Fender 25R Frontman Series II Combo
#3
No rattling noises and I would consider returning it and trying out others now that I actually have some idea how to play, but I nicked the headstock and it is very noticeable. Would new strings help?
#4
I dont know why you are worried about them judging you... everyone starts from nothing, even those guys...

great choice on guitar though, and by ringing is it only on those specific spots? have u tried out the entire fret board from top to bottom on all strings?
#5
I've only come across it when playing with the third fret down for both the e and B strings, when I put a capo on and play the same chords relative to the capo I encounter the same problem. I am going to try a new set of strings, when I look at the e string it is a lot darker over the fret board then it is by the tuning peg, hopefully it can give me a more satisfying tone
#6
strum your guitar really hard then mute the strings...does the ringing sound keep going after you mute the strings? If so, do it again and then also mute the part of the strings that are above the head going to the tuning pegs. Sometimes that little part of a guitar will ring, it mostly happens on really responsive guitars, like my 000-15. If that doesn't help then I have no idea :P
#7
First, you aren't bad.


Try pulling your fingers away from the fret a tiny bit, you may be touching the fret a tiny bit, but I doubt that's it. That area is where the frets on my guitars seem to wear the fastest; check for wear, but since it's doing it with a capo i doubt thats it. You could try, next time when you change strings, only change the bass strings. Some brands, like DR phospher bronze, have high e strings that really ring too much for my taste. I've been known to leave an old one on til I absolutely had to change it.
Bluegrass Rocks

CYNONYTE!

Quote by Basti95
People only come here to get sigged anyway


Quote by Basti95
Rats, I thought someone would sig it and make me famous...

it was going to be my big break

#8
Thank you for the advice, I am not sure what I am going to do now. As the strings age will those ringing noises dull down?
Edit: Also what gauge/type of strings will give me a less of a high ringing tone
Last edited by illinihoops at Feb 22, 2009,
#9
Never tried Elixers. Most people on here say they have a more dull tone. I'm not sure if the treble strings are coated, however.

Put the capo on and strum the strings without fretting anything. Try that all over the fretboard. If it doesn't do it, its probably your fingers being too close to the fret. If it does, try touching the strings near the tuners behind the nut. If that stops it, try putting a piece of cork or cloth near the tuner to muffle the ringing.

And yes, usually those strings will deaden, but not nearly as much or as fast as the bass strings.
Bluegrass Rocks

CYNONYTE!

Quote by Basti95
People only come here to get sigged anyway


Quote by Basti95
Rats, I thought someone would sig it and make me famous...

it was going to be my big break

#10
When I tune my guitar with my electric tuner, I can get all of them to the perfect spot in the middle of the gauge on my tuner but the B and e strings make the pointer go back and forth and on the high e string it will wiggle back and forth and switch from an E to A to E to A at times. I get it tuned the best I can to the point where when I first pluck it is in the correct tone but as it rings it immediately bounces around unlike my other strings. Is this normal and just the way those strings are?

I figure I will just get new strings tomorrow, can anyone recommend good strings for an amateur who is almost exclusively strumming and without too much over powering high strings?
#11
Read the whole thread, and watched the video. I think it's the way you are attacking the strings as you are strumming and the super thin pick you're using isn't helping matters.
Extremely thin picks can give you a twangy, high pitched sound not found with fatter, more rigid picks. The angle at which your pick hits the strings is important also. If you are holding the pick at an angle relevent to the strings, you may be getting a bit of a scraping motion to it and causing some of this. How much of the tip of the pick that is exposed between your fingers is also important. For very thin ones, you want to have only about 1/4 of an inch of pick exposed, with thicker ones, you can allow more as they won't bend as easily.
Try some different gauge picks. Get one that is totally rigid and won't bend at all. You'll find that is the quietest of them, but can be a bit tougher to get used to as well. Watch your pick angle. Learn how to mute strings that you don't want ringing out for chords that require you to do that.
Lastly, new strings. Brand spanking new strings will tend to make what you describe worse as they are more prone to making this sound. As they settle in to their "sweet spot" of their life span, they will sound better, then will get more dull sounding over time as they deaden out. How long this takes is entirely up to you and the strings. How well you take care of them and how long they've been played on will determine this.
I hope some of this is useful to you, and good luck. Nice to see another lefty gettin' after it!
#12
I am a lefty but I am playing a right handed guitar, my webcam mirrored the image. I prefer it over a lefty guitar, I am not sure how many other lefties go this route.
#13
Quote by millerdrr
Put the capo on and strum the strings without fretting anything. Try that all over the fretboard. If it doesn't do it, its probably your fingers being too close to the fret. If it does, try touching the strings near the tuners behind the nut. If that stops it, try putting a piece of cork or cloth near the tuner to muffle the ringing.

This. This was it for me. Yamaha APX700II 

Folded piece of toilet paper slid behind the strings on the headstock. Ringing noise completely eliminated, instantly. 

Thank you SO much, I can finally go back to that song I was recording and play it properly instead of trying to fix that noise with EQ passes (which mostly worked but... ugh).

Don't get me wrong, toilet paper looks bloody stupid. But that is so far from the point as to be redundant when just trying to diagnose the problem

And yeah. Thread necro. I care not, this deserves more bump. 
Last edited by jez.grumpypants at Aug 9, 2017,