#1
can anyone explain to me how to bend properly , i know how to bend the strings but when i bend,like when it says bend a string 1/2 and then i do it it doesnt sound right. im trying to learn I wont see you tonight part 1 by A7X and the intro has the bend but mine never sound right, i either bend too much or too little. whats an easy way to tell the bending intervals(couldnt think of another name) like half , full, one and a half etc.

thanx

Next purchase: Peavey Vypyr 30 Combo Amp
#3
practice your bending by fretting the note you are supposed to bend to, and slowly bending to it and keeping at the right pitch
then speed up and work it into the music??
BE HAPPY

Quote by ajmasterjaydude
so this kid at my school microwaved brussel sprouts for lunch, and when he was about to eat them one of them exploded on his face and burned him. i like turtles


in a thread about malmsteen^
#4
Those fractions are references to tones. In it's simplest form, think of each fret as half a tone. So If a tab asks you to bend 1/2, it means that you should bend it until you have the same sound as if you were fretting it one fret up. If it asks for 1 tone, 2 frets.

So the easiest way to figure it out is to first play the higher string, for example if it is a bend on the 10th going up 1/2, first play the 11th to know where you should bend the note to, and then bend the 10th. Over time you'll learn where exactly to bend to, because it generally keeps within the relevant scale of the song.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by White-Trash Wil
can anyone explain to me how to bend properly , i know how to bend the strings but when i bend,like when it says bend a string 1/2 and then i do it it doesnt sound right. im trying to learn I wont see you tonight part 1 by A7X and the intro has the bend but mine never sound right, i either bend too much or too little. whats an easy way to tell the bending intervals(couldnt think of another name) like half , full, one and a half etc.

thanx


You need to train your ear to be able to distinguish those intervals (you used the right words). When a bend comes up in the tab, fret the note however much higher (remember, one fret=half a step) it needs to be and then remember what that sounds like. Then bend the note up to that pitch. The longer you play, the better your ears will get.
"There he goes. One of God's own prototypes. Some kind of high powered mutant never even considered for mass production. Too weird to live, and too rare to die."-Duke
#6
That is the easiest and best method, but if you find that too difficult you can use a tuner.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#7
there is no way of knowing, because the amount you have to bend to get any same pitch change is different everywhere on the fretboard. so you just have to get used to it. but it's great that you realize your bends don't sound good! many people fail at that.
Quote by archerygenious
Jesus Christ since when is the Pit a ****ing courtroom...

Like melodic, black, death, symphonic, and/or avant-garde metal? Want to collaborate? Message me!
#8
It is possible to memorize the amount of muscle you have to put in on every place on the fretboard after you've been playing the same guitar long enough.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#10
Quote by The_Sophist
It is possible to memorize the amount of muscle you have to put in on every place on the fretboard after you've been playing the same guitar long enough.

Also, the fact that very often you are picking the note then bending means that you can listen and just bend till you hear the right note.
#11
Which requires you to know the sound you need, which brings us back where we started.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#12
on a side note, why dont we bend downwards, instead of upwards? sure, on the low E we HAVE to bend down, and on the high E and B it isnt possible. It makes more sense logically, to bend with gravity then against it. Wouldnt it require less energy to bend downwards?
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#13
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
on a side note, why dont we bend downwards, instead of upwards? sure, on the low E we HAVE to bend down, and on the high E and B it isnt possible. It makes more sense logically, to bend with gravity then against it. Wouldnt it require less energy to bend downwards?


I think it takes a little more energy from your hand, it's more like pulling the string down than pushing it up. That said, I am confident in saying that most players would do both on the middle strings, conciously or subconciously.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
on a side note, why dont we bend downwards, instead of upwards? sure, on the low E we HAVE to bend down, and on the high E and B it isnt possible. It makes more sense logically, to bend with gravity then against it. Wouldnt it require less energy to bend downwards?


If we were to bend the high e and b string downwards, the strings would come off the fretboard. If you bent the low e, a or d upwards they would come off the fretboard so we bend those strings downwards. the gstring can be bent either way.
radiantmoon is the toughest person I know. He inflects a sense of impending doom upon any who look upon his stone-chiseled face. The children run out of fear, while the men run for they know that the stories are true.
#15
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
on a side note, why dont we bend downwards, instead of upwards? sure, on the low E we HAVE to bend down, and on the high E and B it isnt possible. It makes more sense logically, to bend with gravity then against it. Wouldnt it require less energy to bend downwards?

well i think that if we did that then you couldnt do static bends(where you bend one string and fret a string above the string you are bending) and B bender type licks as well as most blues and classic rock licks. i bend down on the lower strings though.
#16
You bend towards the middle of the neck - ie, down on the EAD, up on GBE. Plenty of bending tips in the AT sticky, btw, although you'll definately have to learn to listen to what you're playing.
#17
Dudes, you use ur ears to check, and to some extent ur muscle memory. Only after a while, just a milli second of hearing the bended note is enough to tell ur muscles how far too bend the string to get in tune.

The more you play, the more developed ur ears get, and the better ur playing will get.

People are just used to using there eyes for pure orientation, and not there ears. Why this is evolved like that I dunno. Some creatures use eyes to survive, and some their ears.

TS, practice, go slowly.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??
Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 22, 2009,
#18
There's something else to understand about bends: it's not linear.

For example, if 0 = no bend, A = bend distance for 1/2 step, B = bend distance for 1 step, C = bend distance for 1 1/2 steps, it might look like:


0----------------------------------A-----------B----C

I'd also say, the physical effort is also works the same way -- ie getting the string from B -> C is MUCH harder than the equivalent distance from 0.