#1
Two questions really:
1. What kind of chord progressions (e.g. i, IV, V) are common in metal?
2. What chords go well under what notes? I know it's a backward way of doing things but I've written a few leads and can't come up with chord progressions that go well under them.
Gear List:
B.C. Rich NT Jr. V (With Seymour Duncan AHB-1 Blackout in bridge)
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Marshall MG15DFX
Jazz III picks
DR strings
Planet Waves Cables
#2
Write a chord progression to a melody is actually easier than writing a melody to a chord progression. Just decide on the kind of movements you want and use chord with the important notes in them.

One common chord progression for black metal is just moving in minor thirds.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#3
Quote by LeperAffinity
Two questions really:
1. What kind of chord progressions (e.g. i, IV, V) are common in metal?


There is no such thing as common chord progressions in metal.

Quote by LeperAffinity
2. What chords go well under what notes? I know it's a backward way of doing things but I've written a few leads and can't come up with chord progressions that go well under them.


Figure out the notes, figure out a scale that best fits the lead, then write a riff in that scale. I get this problem too and i haven't found any other way to solve it.

anyone else got any ideas?
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
Last edited by allislost at Feb 21, 2009,
#4
1. That is heavily dependent on the style. If you name some bands to which you'd like to sound similar, that will be helpful. For instance, if you say Iron Maiden, I would tell you that almost every song they've written contains a I5 VI5 VII5 or I5 VI5 III5 VII6 progression.

2. Analyze the notes to see about what scale you're using; that will make it much easier. After that, look at the notes that fall on the downbeats, especially 1 and 3 (in 4/4). Those notes likely outline your progression. Also see if there's anything in the background when you sing the riff in your head; if so, play that (always).
#5
Quote by LeperAffinity
Two questions really:
1. What kind of chord progressions (e.g. i, IV, V) are common in metal?

Most chord progressions will vaguely follow this pattern:
Tonic - passing chord - Predominant - Dominant - Back to tonic

The tonic is a straight minor or major chord

The passing chord is just any chord which fits betweent he predominant and the tonic. It's not even necessary

The predominant is usually a IV or ii or vi chord, but there are millions of different predominants. Wiki/research them.

The dominant chord is a V chord. It can be substituted for a vii0 chord or as a tritone sub (bII7).
Quote by LeperAffinity
2. What chords go well under what notes?
Chord tones.
Quote by LeperAffinity
I know it's a backward way of doing things but I've written a few leads and can't come up with chord progressions that go well under them.
Make sure the first note of each bar is a chord tone and follow the pattern at the top of my post. You might have to change a few notes though.

It's actually not backwards. Most classical songs will start as a single melody, then a chord progression will be added later.
        ,
        |\
[U]        | |                     [/U]
[U]        |/     .-.              [/U]
[U]       /|_     `-’       |      [/U]
[U]      //| \      |       |      [/U]
[U]     | \|_ |     |     .-|      [/U]
      *-|-*    (_)     `-’
        |
        L.
#6
Quote by demonofthenight
It's actually not backwards. Most classical songs will start as a single melody, then a chord progression will be added later.
That doesn't mean the composer wrote the melody first. I like having a melody going and then having the rest of the band crash in, but I've only written I think two melodies before I wrote the chords beneath them.
#7
Quote by demonofthenight
Most chord progressions will vaguely follow this pattern:
Tonic - passing chord - Predominant - Dominant - Back to tonic

The tonic is a straight minor or major chord

The passing chord is just any chord which fits betweent he predominant and the tonic. It's not even necessary

The predominant is usually a IV or ii or vi chord, but there are millions of different predominants. Wiki/research them.

The dominant chord is a V chord. It can be substituted for a vii0 chord or as a tritone sub (bII7).
Chord tones.
Make sure the first note of each bar is a chord tone and follow the pattern at the top of my post. You might have to change a few notes though.


Can you post some example that utilize this idea?
*reported*... twice in one reply!


OH NOES!!! Theowy is scawY!!!
#8
Thanks for the tips guys, I know the notes I'm playing, just not what they should go with.
The riff I'm currently focusing on is using the C minor scale.
I'm trying to get sounds similar to Children of Bodom, but obviously not end up sounding exactly the same.
Gear List:
B.C. Rich NT Jr. V (With Seymour Duncan AHB-1 Blackout in bridge)
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Marshall MG15DFX
Jazz III picks
DR strings
Planet Waves Cables
#9
A --------------------------------------------------
E --------------------------------------------------
C --------------------------------------------------
G 22222222333333333222222223333333
D 22222222333333333222222223333333
A 00000000111111111000000001111111
I ain't racist, but fuck black people! - Michael Richards

Nigga please - Al Sharpton

Nigga please - Me
Last edited by bigz6006 at Feb 22, 2009,
#10
Children of Bodom's sound is based on simple, thick powerchord riffs with a moving melody, usually starting and ending on a chord tone, implied or not. Study some of thier songs, learn the melodies, and learn what they are played over.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.