#1
Ok, I know that learning your scales is VERY important, so I'm working on it every chance I get. I know that scales are used in not only solos, but also they are used in creating the chords and chord progressions for songs, and other such stuff.

The things I don't really understand are these:

How does knowing your scales/modes help you in soloing? I mean, I play them all day long in some cases, but I never have seen any musicallity in this. (and yes, I know that all things, including scales are "musical") I never really see any music coming from practicing my scales/modes. (although some of my chord practice has yielded a LITTLE musicallity)

&

I guess it would help if I really understood what the solo is, and what soloing is all about really. I realize it's a tool in the artist's arsenal that, if used properly, can shift the gears of a song either temporarily, or perminently. Beyond this though, I haven't a clue about solos, or soloing.

I mean it's one thing to learn a solo, but understanding the ins and outs of the solo, and etc... what's it all about really?

I do however know that solos and what not are used to get the music to seem to cry out in this way or that way. They are what create that magic in a piece of music... at least on my side of things .

(from later in the thread)
I guess it's also worth mentioning that I have no job, so lessons are out of the picture sadly... man, I've always wanted lessons from a teacher in the area.
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

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Last edited by Outside Octaves at Feb 22, 2009,
#2
I think it's mostly just that scales help you to learn the notes on the fretboard. It's when you start learning different patterns that the music really starts to come out. Try applying pentatonic patterns to your scales: they are the building blocks to all solos.
#3
^^ Exactly, also in a lot of things I have made up, I use scaled and change some of the notes in them to make a cool riff, then add another and another then before you know it you got a really cool solo!
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#4
Think of it like this; scales are a language. When someone is soloing, he's speaking a certain language; Pentatonic, Major, Locrian, etc. So by knowing the scale, (patterns), you'll be able to find the "words" that are being spoken.
In the same way, if you're trying to create a solo of your own, the scale gives you note choices, that work with the chords. By practicing scales, you're training your fingers where to go.
Just playing up and down a scale, is boring. So when you're soloing, try doing things like hammer-ons and pull-offs, slides, bends, sequence patterns, etc. Learn some blues licks.
Once you start to do some of these ideas, you should begin to see how scales are just a creative tool.
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#5
Well, yes, they are creative tools. No doubt there. So, these blues licks that every talks about. Are you guys just talking about learning 12 bar blues, individual songs by various artist or parts there of, or is there some sort of set of short "licks" that are universally learned? And sequence patterns? I would love an expansion on this too.
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#6
There are tons of licks that everybody uses. ex. here's one in the key of Em

e----------------------------
b--12-h-15-p-12---------
g--------------------h14---
d----------------------------
a----------------------------
E-----------------------------


A sequence pattern is a series of melodic ideas that repeats identically, except that it may begin at higher or lower pitches.

Ex. take everybodies favorite minor Pentatonic box. (hopefully you know what I'm talking about). Number each note, so you have 1-12. Now play the first 3 notes, 1,2,3. Then start on 2, and go 2,3,4. 3,4,5. 4,5,6. etc.
There are all kinds of sequnces. So experiment. Try groups of 3. Groups of 4 and so on.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#7
Oh, that oldie but goodie. Well, that I've done before, with the same results as the other stuff. I dunno, it just doesn't ... oi. I'm just dumbfounded here. Quite flabergasted.
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

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#8
Try learning some "simpler" solos, like You Shook Me All Night Long. Or even just some of the licks from your favorite songs. You should be able to see what scale patterns the licks are coming from.
Maybe find a good teacher in your area. They'll be able to get you started in a lesson or two. Sometimes, seeing someone else do what you want to do, will make a lot more sense.
There's my way and the wrong way.
#9
That's just it, you don't "play" scales - you learn about them and ultimately learn how to use them. Get used to the sounds the scale makes, learn the context it can be used in, play around with the intervals and construct melodies, learn how the notes function over different chords etc.

That's what you do with scales, just sitting there mindlessly running scale patterns is boring and also pretty useless. Scales are musical, they aren't music.
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#10
well, then... I've tried playing the notes of a scale over those damned jam tracks... but it just sounds like crap... random or not, either way it always comes out crappy ... of course, It doesn't help that I don't know one sound from another when it comes to labeling them.

I'm not tonedef or anything, I just have a hard time telling an A from a C. Yea, I can tell the pitch, but I couldn't tell you which was which if someone else was playing and I wasn't looking at the fretboard... I guess I need to dev. my ear, but even then... I wouldn't know how to begin on that at all... I"ve tried that thing where you just sit there playing an A and saying A, play an A, say A... play a c , say C... but that never worked out for me so far... but I guess that's for another thread I'm guessing, lol.

I guess it's also worth mentioning that I have no job, so lessons are out of the picture sadly... man, I've always wanted lessons from a teacher in the area.
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

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Last edited by Outside Octaves at Feb 22, 2009,
#11
That's just it, you aren't going to know sounds right of the bat - training your ears is just as, if not more important than worrying about where your fingers go.
Actually called Mark!

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People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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#12
I still don't see how you train your ears?

I'm going to look at what you guys have up on UG... see if I can find anything on this (I'm sure there's millions of threads, lmao).
"grateful is he who plays with open fingers" - Me

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Last edited by Outside Octaves at Feb 23, 2009,