#1
I've been trying pretty hard to learn theory, and I think I've got the basics down. But when I pick up my guitar and try to write a basic song, with just like a verse and a solo part, I can't do it.

I realized that I need a basic song with an explanation. Yes, I know there are tons of guides that say which chords go with what, and which scales I can play over them, but I've never seen one which explains it all together. If anybody knows of something like this, or would just be kind enough to chain together some chords and a little solo over it and explain it, it'd be greatly appreciated.

I'm not asking anyone to do that though, a link to someplace that has something like that would also be nice.

Thank you.
#3
If you want to make chord progressions using theory, you need to analyze songs. Have you learned about chord functions, and harmonizing?
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Last edited by BlisteringDDj at Feb 22, 2009,
#4
OK, lets start in A minor for you because it's a nice easy key to start writing songs in. In this key, you can use the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and A again. Thats the A minor scale. You can use the chords A minor, B diminished, C major, D minor, E minor, F major, and G major. Personally, to start out I'd avoid the B diminished chord. It's the hardest to play and hardest to get to work.

From here, you can use any combination of these chords, but a typical chord progression would be something along the lines of:
|: Am | G | C | Am :|
The dots just mean repeat the sequeance. This could be your verse.

Over this, you could then use the following scales to solo:
A minor, A minor pentatonic, A blues.

Other scales would work, but these will do for now. They're basic scales, easy to use effectively with simple chord progressions.

For a chorus, you might want to go to the relative major of the key (3 frets up from the minor, in this case C major).

This could be you chorus chords:
| C | F | G | C |

That would work.

Hope this helps to some extent :-)
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#5
Well, I think that my composition skills come mostly from listening to a lot of music. I mean, when I'm making music, I'm not thinking: "oh, I wanna do a music in C, and use the 2nd and 5th chords, or whatever". It is indeed useful to know that stuff, but that's just not the way I do things.

When you listen to a really big amount of music, you start getting the feeling of things... At least i believe so
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#6
Quote by M.B.MetalTabber
OK, lets start in A minor for you because it's a nice easy key to start writing songs in. In this key, you can use the notes A, B, C, D, E, F, G, and A again. Thats the A minor scale. You can use the chords A minor, B diminished, C major, D minor, E minor, F major, and G major. Personally, to start out I'd avoid the B diminished chord. It's the hardest to play and hardest to get to work.

From here, you can use any combination of these chords, but a typical chord progression would be something along the lines of:
|: Am | G | C | Am :|
The dots just mean repeat the sequeance. This could be your verse.

Over this, you could then use the following scales to solo:
A minor, A minor pentatonic, A blues.

Other scales would work, but these will do for now. They're basic scales, easy to use effectively with simple chord progressions.

For a chorus, you might want to go to the relative major of the key (3 frets up from the minor, in this case C major).

This could be you chorus chords:
| C | F | G | C |

That would work.

Hope this helps to some extent :-)


Actually that`s A-Aelion scale or Natural Harmonic/Minor
#7
Quote by MaXiMuse
Actually that`s A-Aelion scale or Natural Harmonic/Minor

It's the A (natural) minor scale - no need to bring modes into it because it's not a modal piece and it's not the harmonic minor which has a raised 7th which makes resolving back to the root nicer.
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#8
Actually, when writing in a minor key it's best to make the V chord major. In A minor, that E minor would become E major or E7. This is caused by the raised leading tone in the harmonic minor. It's common because it makes the V chord major and thus has a stronger resolution to the tonic.
#9
Quote by pwrmax
Actually, when writing in a minor key it's best to make the V chord major. In A minor, that E minor would become E major or E7. This is caused by the raised leading tone in the harmonic minor. It's common because it makes the V chord major and thus has a stronger resolution to the tonic.


Yes, minor keys have a couple of non diatonic chords in their progressions.
#10
Thanks for the help everybody. I found a lot of advice in this thread.

I'm guessing my biggest problem is chord progression and scale playing over chords. I've read some stuff and know quite a bit (or so I thought ), but it's obvious that I haven't learned these as much as I should have. Any advice on these subjects?
#12
Harmonic minor is used for resolving to the root, but in no way is making the dominant a major/dominant chord any better than a minor, it's just different.
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#14
Quote by The_Sophist
Harmonic minor is used for resolving to the root, but in no way is making the dominant a major/dominant chord any better than a minor, it's just different.


It actually does make it a better dominant chord, since the v chord barely functions as a dominant at all. You can certainly use a v chord all you like, just as long as you're aware that it's not really functioning as a dominant.
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