#1
Right, I'm learning about modes so i can mix up my playing and i understand about how they are all constructed off the major scale, but what i don't understand is, if we take the modes of C major:

C Ionian
D Dorian
E Phrygian
F Lydian


etcc.....

in soloing say the song was in C Major, but i wanted to make the solo sound Dorian like. Would I play C Dorian to spice it up, or play D Dorian to keep it within the key signature.

This is really confusing me

I'm certain it must be play C Dorian

otherwise D Dorian would be hard to mix up as it'd just sound like C Ionian but you'd start on a different note

Help?
#2
If your chord progression is C major you can't play D dorian.
If you play C dorian over C major it will sound strange. Probably bluesy due to the b3 and b7.
#3
Quote by Declan87
If your chord progression is C major you can't play D dorian.
If you play C dorian over C major it will sound strange. Probably bluesy due to the b3 and b7.


Is that because D Dorian is just C major.

and when you say it will sound strange is it a good strange as in modally

like will it sound different but cool?
#4
It wouldn't be modal playing either way. Modes are complicated, but I believe that the only way you can play C Dorian is over a Cm7 static vamp or another strictly modal progression. Hence you can't play D Dorian over any key in C either. I'm not sure what you would call it if you used C dorian(as in, the intervals W-H-W-W-W-H-W) over a C major vamp/progression.
#5
Quote by dancelasvegas
Is that because D Dorian is just C major.

and when you say it will sound strange is it a good strange as in modally

like will it sound different but cool?

Play it and decide for yourself.

^Although he wouldn't technically be playing modally (because when you're playing modally there can't be any chromatic notes) the best way to refer to it would proabably be just "playing C dorian over a C major progression". You could also just say he was playing in C major but using b3 and b7.
#6
Quote by 12345abcd3
Play it and decide for yourself.

^Although he wouldn't technically be playing modally (because when you're playing modally there can't be any chromatic notes) the best way to refer to it would proabably be just "playing C dorian over a C major progression". You could also just say he was playing in C major but using b3 and b7.


Im pretty sure they would just be though of as accidentals or chromatic notes. Dorian is a minor mode, it wouldnt work over C major.
#7
If the progression is in C major, you play the C major scale. Modes have absolutely nothing to do with it. Delete this thread, read the theory sticky and crusade articles, and make sure you have a working knowledge of tonal harmony before worrying about modes.

Modes are not something you use to "spice up" your playing. They are used in contexts specifically designed for them.
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