#1
I've been both a guitarist and bass guitarist for quite a few years now, and one thing I always hear from people is that a person should pick one instrument and specialize in it, for example a person should pick bass and not play any other instrument. However, looking at my favorite virtuosos, I notice that many of them play multiple instruments and are quite good at them for example: Eddie Van Halen, or John Entwhistle. I personally play both guitar and bass, and I adapt my techniques to work on both instruments. So I ask, what do you guys think? Should a person specialize or should they diversify?
Easily the second best guitarist from Oklahoma City
#3
It's music.

You should specialize long enough to know the instrument.

Most musicians I know play 3, 4, or more instruments well. My cousin plays Piano, Bass, Guitar, Drums, Clarinet, and the Trumpet. I play Guitar, I'm starting Piano next month, and have plans to learn Bass afterwards. (I'm also learning to sing, self taught because I don't have the money though but I've been reading a lot of good tips that have already started to help me)

tl;dr
Diversify.




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#5
I'd say I play piano best. I'm good at guitar and trumpet. I suck at saxophone and drums.
#6
That's an idiotic notion. Learning bass made me better at guitar. Learning piano is making me better at guitar and bass.

Learning more instruments will also make you a better musician, if that's important to you.

Learning to play the didjeridoo probably didn't help much. But it is fun.
#7
Playing one instrument will not make you worse at another, but it will take time away from playing others. It is quite possible to be good at more than one, just takes more time.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#8
Quote by The_Sophist
Playing one instrument will not make you worse at another, but it will take time away from playing others. It is quite possible to be good at more than one, just takes more time.

Yep. The only real issue is time.

But with instruments as similar as guitar and bass a lot is going to carry over (i.e. familiarity with the fretboard) so you don't have much to worry about....
#9
I actually think framiliarity with the fretboard is the only thing they have in common, along with vaguely similar fretting hand technique.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#10
My opinion on this is that either way, you are going to be better in one then the other.


I think you should learn what you want.