#1
I know some of this has been hashed out before and this is pretty much a newbie question, but please humor me.

I have been experimenting around with some new picks over the past three or so weeks, and I noticed that the pick's tip has been angling back towards my palm. I am going to try and show it with a couple of photos. This is a photo of the pick in perfect perpendicular angle from my fingers to the guitars strings:



This is the way i was originally taught. I would use just the very tip to play on the strings. But now, the pick has angled backed like the following:



(Sorry if this is not clear).

When I hold it like this, I tend to play it on the edge just above the tip on the side opposite the palm (i.e., on the left side as you are looking down.)

I am not sure when I started doing this, but I find it very comfortable to strum, but a little harder to pick.

My question is--is this going to be a problem? SHould I work hard to go back to my original angle or is this just a matter preference?
1999 Gibson LP R9
2006 Tele John Cruz Masterbuilt
2007 MIA Strat Sunburst
2008 PRS SC-J Thinline Black Cherry/Bigsby (for sale)
2009 Zerberus Hydra II
2009 Custom Red Strat

Traynor YCV-50 Blue
#2
I think it's all just a matter of preference. When I strum I sometimes let my pick go all the way sideways but when I'm actually picking something I'll keep it perpendicular.
#3
At the end of the day, it's what's comfortable for you. But I remember in some Paul Gilbert interview, he said that if you wanted to alternate pick extremely fast, you had to angle the pick slightly the other way. Don't remember where it was from or exactly what he said, but this was how to fix it:

That joint in your thumb is straight, even bent slightly backwards. You want to bend it a little bit.
#4
I use to hold my pick the way you hold it in your first picture. Then when I started taking lessons I was informed that was the incorrect way to hold the pick. You need to angle it more the direction your thumb is pointing. So like if your thumb was pointing to 12 on a clock, you would want your pick pointing somewhere around 10 oclock...
Gear:

Carvin Cobalt-350
LTD Alexi-600
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Line 6 Spider III 15
Boss DD-20
Boss DS-1
Boss MT-2
Boss FZ-5
Dunlop Slash Wah
#5
Quote by m_Soares
I use to hold my pick the way you hold it in your first picture. Then when I started taking lessons I was informed that was the incorrect way to hold the pick. You need to angle it more the direction your thumb is pointing. So like if your thumb was pointing to 12 on a clock, you would want your pick pointing somewhere around 10 oclock...


So to be clear angling away from the palm, or opposite the way I have been holding it recently.
1999 Gibson LP R9
2006 Tele John Cruz Masterbuilt
2007 MIA Strat Sunburst
2008 PRS SC-J Thinline Black Cherry/Bigsby (for sale)
2009 Zerberus Hydra II
2009 Custom Red Strat

Traynor YCV-50 Blue
#6
Exactly so pretty much the opposite of your 2nd picture.
Gear:

Carvin Cobalt-350
LTD Alexi-600
Epiphone Les Paul Custom
Line 6 Spider III 15
Boss DD-20
Boss DS-1
Boss MT-2
Boss FZ-5
Dunlop Slash Wah
#7
Quote by tigerking615
At the end of the day, it's what's comfortable for you. But I remember in some Paul Gilbert interview, he said that if you wanted to alternate pick extremely fast, you had to angle the pick slightly the other way. Don't remember where it was from or exactly what he said, but this was how to fix it:

That joint in your thumb is straight, even bent slightly backwards. You want to bend it a little bit.


PG angling the pick method is more about getting the treble style twang he has mastered, rather than speed. It means every string he hits sounds metalic (well, that's how I describe it) because the pick and the string are partially scraping. At face melting speed it is one of the reasons (IMO) he sounds fricken awesome.

I would say it's really a matter of preference and playing style. If you want to really build up steam and shred, most recommend making the O shape with your thumb and index finger, resting the palm of your pick hand just off the bridge and playing from your wrist. However, if you're strumming chords, this isn't what you will want to be doing, you would probably want loose hands and be using your elbow......... So playing style should play a part.