#1
I understand that C major is the same thing as A minor, so why do composers call their compositions "Piano Concerto in A minor" when they could just call it C major, does it make a difference or not?
#3
Quote by alander321
I understand that C major is the same thing as A minor


There's major differences between the 2. A piece usually cadences to the tonic, minors can have a raised leading tone, the list goes on. Learn how harmonic analysis works and you will see the difference.
#4
Quote by alander321
I understand that C major is the same thing as A minor, so why do composers call their compositions "Piano Concerto in A minor" when they could just call it C major, does it make a difference or not?


it depends on where the tonal center is.

I'll keep it as simple as possible
A key is based on quality and tonal center.
if a song is in A minor the root note will be A (that's the note that feels like home)

if the song sounded happy it would be a major key (A major)
if it sounds sad then it would be A minor

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Last edited by fenderuser93 at Feb 22, 2009,
#5
It's not the same thing. While the notes are the same, it has to do with the harmony the song is in. For instance, a song played in A minor will not sound the same in C major because there are chords that sound appropriate in A minor but not in C major.

EDIT: ^Yeah, tonal center (crap I can't believe I forgot that term...)
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#6
Quote by Invokke_Havokk
Possibly because it's not the same...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relative_key

Wikipedia? Are you actually serious?
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#7
It's strange but you just have to think about the sound. C Major and A Minor may have the same notes, but they emphasize different notes. So let's say you played a song in the key of C Major with a chord progression of C maj, F maj, G maj, A min. You could play another progression in the key of A minor with D min, E min, A min, C maj. It's the sound and the notes that you emphasize that matter is what makes the difference between C Major and A Minor.
#8
Quote by pengiunman
Wikipedia? Are you actually serious?


Yes. It's a reliable source in this case
They are not the same thing..
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#9
Quote by pengiunman
Wikipedia? Are you actually serious?


It's a decent enough resource for stuff like this, most of its reputation for unreliability comes from its reporting of current events stuff.

But yeah they are different even if they use the same notes, they have a different tonal center and thus you would use different chords under them and whatnot. Play each scale back to back and hear it for yourself.
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#10
Quote by pengiunman
Wikipedia? Are you actually serious?

Once in a blue moon you can find some reliable sources on there.




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#11
Quote by fenderuser93

if the song sounded happy it would be a major key (A major)
if it sounds sad then it would be A minor



Not necessarily true. Some major key songs sound sad and some minor key songs sound cool or exciting.

Let's stick to just major and minor here. If a song resolves to A (that is, if the root is A and the song seems to pull to the root), then it will either be A major or A minor (ignoring modes and scale variations).

A major = A B C# D E F# G#

A minor = A B C D E F G

A minor is taught to be derived from C major because they have the same notes. But A minor is in the key of A, NOT C. A minor scale is just a major scale with a flat 3rd, 6th, and 7th.
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#12
It depends on the chords used, the way they flow from one to another, the mood of the piece and the way the melody works with the chords.


If its in A minor ending on C wont work, it will resolve to A.


Its not the most theory correct answer but a minor key is usually sad and major is usually happy, so if its a happy piece and its called "Sonata in A minor" it won't really fit.