#1
I was just thinking of something. When people normally ask how a high end Epiphone compares to a Gibson or how a Fender MIM Standard compares to a Fender MIA Standard, people normally say that the Gibson or the MIA Fender are made of better woods(higher wood quality) and that they are built better.

Built better is easily taking care of by simply trying out the guitar before you play it. If you like how it feels in general, what's wrong with the build quality there? (Yes, I know, many are built poorly, but there are many good ones too.)

Now, how important really is the wood quality? I mean, when people make threads asking about new guitars to change thier tone, people say "well the amp is (whatever high number they think of) % of your tone". Then, obviously comes pickups. Then comes the type of wood. Notice I say type, not quality. By type I mean obviously alder sounds different then mahogany, ect. Then strings and all the little other things come into play.

So, in your tone, honestly how noticable is an average quality piece of wood compared to a high quality one? With your amp and pickups in the equation, how would anyone really notice your playing a lower quality piece of wood? Also, is there more too wood quality that I'm missing?
Strats & Seagulls
#3
Quote by XxGibsonSGxX
Okay, I will try and help you.

Actually, why not have a lovely gander at this thread?

The Only Tone Wood Thread

I'm sure all your questions can be answered there, if they aren't already.


Thanks, that looks like a great thread, but I'm not really looking for the different types of woods, but how a high quality piece of one wood compares to a lower quality piece of the same type of wood in the big picture. If you understand what I'm trying to say.
Strats & Seagulls
#4
Well part of wood quality is the look. you will notice that custom guitars have natural finish or some finish that complements the wood most of the time. This is because the wood quality is high, there are no marks, and it just looks nice. Look at Perry Ormsby's guitars, lots of them have a finish that really complements the wood. Onyxforge guitars almost always dont have any finish.
#5
Higher quality woods will resonate better, thus giving your guitar more sustain, and they will also cut out more of the horrible overtones that you sometimes get with cheap guitars.
Gear:
Gibson SG Standard
PURPLE PRS Custom 24
PURPLE PRS Custom 22
MXR Carbon Copy
Mesa/Boogie DC-5 and two matching half-back 2x12s

I'd like to meet satan, I bet he's a nice guy.
#6
I do understand what you're trying to say.

Seriously, it might be in that thread somewhere. If not, I really recommend PM'ing LP Addict, the starter of that thread, and UG's "Wood kawn-e-sewer". I am adamant he can help you, if you're really curious.

EDIT: If you PM him, I think he will sigh, and redirect you there anyways.
Last edited by XxGibsonSGxX at Feb 23, 2009,
#7
Quote by XxGibsonSGxX
I do understand what you're trying to say.

Seriously, it might be in that thread somewhere. If not, I really recommend PM'ing LP Addict, the starter of that thread, and UG's "Wood kawn-e-sewer". I am adamant he can help you, if you're really curious.

EDIT: If you PM him, I think he will sigh, and redirect you there anyways.

Haha thanks, I'll try that if no one can answer my question. Yeah, I'll skim through the pages of that thread to see if the answer is there somewhere. I just really read the first post, but didn't see anything about high quality vs. average quality.

Strats & Seagulls
#8
Wood Quality is everything man. If you can make your guitar sound great unplugged, and it sounds bad plugged in that's easily fixable.

A good chunk of Alder or Ash (and koa for those few of you) makes a strat, regardless of where its made how much it costs or what pickups you're using. This varies from guitar to guitar which is why its good to try guitars out first. You usually find the best wood on American Strats, but its not that hard to find a great Mexican Strat of equal wood quality if you try a bunch out.

I truly believe that the quality of the chunk of wood used on the guitar dictates its overall tone no matter where its made.
UG's Prodigal Son