#1
First off, I know this probably isnt the best forum to post this on, but Ill try anyway because its probably the one forum where I wont get flamed to death and because I want to take a more acoustic focus on my playing.

I been playing for over 2 years and i feel that i have finally reached a plateu, whenever I try to learn something new, i feel its either too easy or too hard, and I end giving up the song because i lose motivation, and i know you cant teach me how to get out of the rut but i would really appreciate it if anyone could point me to the right place, maybe giving me some advise of how you got "unstuck"

So please if anyone could help me out, i would greatly appreciate it.

Rulfo

on a side note, if any mods feel they should move it, i guess im ok with it. Also how can I lower the action on a Nylon Classical guitar? thnx again
#3
Yes, but how do I move on, cuz i feel Im not progressing and that whatever I play sounds to crappy or empty/dull, even my own riffs.

Thnx anyway
#4
i say you just gotta force yourself to learn those harder songs. It sucks during, but you'll find it worth it when you're even better at guitar. Oh, and try playing a completely different genre, it helps to get a new viewpoint on music, which helps you to keep originality to your own music. Hope i helped!
#5
I agree with the completely different genre statement.

Once you hit the plateau I feel as though you have to re-examine everything about your playing and tweak it as such. I personally learned: I was not relaxing enough, my fingers weren't straight, and I was concentrating too much on speed, not precision and accuracy. I slowed down a lot, learned the blues, learned theory. After, sweep picking came naturally
#6
Tune your acoustic to open G and buy a slide. Months of new guitar ahead of you....
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#7
Go to Open C and learn Ocean

Please use tags for tabs....
#8
Quote by Martindecorum
ur at that stage, the stage of creativity and theory which will help you understand the harder stuff and song creation of your own

This. Buy the book fretboard logic, music theory for dummies, and maybe something like Terrifying technique for physical exercises, and you will get out of your rut. I absolutely agree that picking up some theory and starting to write your own stuff is a fabulous was to get out of a rut. Quit trying to figure out songs....yeah, I realize when you play for other people, they want to hear songs, but that can get stale quick. Start soloing over songs in your music collection, and get a looper, write your own chord progressions, and solo over it.

That 2 year rut is the exact reason I bought a digitech GNX4 and started studying some theory, and I havent looked back since. All of a sudden, the hard songs will be much easier to learn.
#9
Im already learning some theory, though i just begun. And i dont know what new genra to pick, Ill probably do blues and i would like to learn jazz/flameco since i tryed classic rock, alternative, punk, indie, grunge, and some trash/metalcore.

Can anyone point me to some blues (acoustic though some electric is fine i guess) and maybe even some easy/simple jazz songs?

Thnx again

BTW anyone know where can i get a decent loop pedal or a cheap pedalboard in Mexico? thnx
#10
I hit my rut really early in my playing days, i just kept branching out and even learning songs i didnt care for, just to learn them. the more i switched around the easier it was to learn new genres, the advice youve gotten so far is spot on, just dont give up, maybe try to get some gigs somewhere to boost your confidence in your playing.
#11
I do have to play in May for the music workshop presentation, and I played a talent show before, but can anyone point me to some songs i could learn, like Ocean by the John Butler Trio the guy above said. Maybe a little easier, although i dont know if I should go for hard songs on a new, different music genre. Still could someone mention some blues, acoustic songs? thnx again im starting to feel a lil more motivated XD
#12
Quote by el rulfo
First off, I know this probably isnt the best forum to post this on, but Ill try anyway because its probably the one forum where I wont get flamed to death



If you need inspiration, there are a million places to look. Many people have made great suggestions, but the chances are you wont have the musical revelation you're hoping for. The goal is just to ease through your plateau rather than stress out about it.

So here are my suggestions:

-Learn to sing and play, if you can't already. It really makes playing that much more satisfying (and impresses a lot of people).

-Lose the pick for a while. Try playing with your fingers to bridge the gap between single note plucking and plain strumming.

-Learn a little bit of theory, but don't kill yourself trying to memorize modes and things like that. Just pick up some chord construction rules from here and there.

-Which leads into... Write some original songs. You probably wont like them (I rarely like any of my own songs), but nothing fuels the playing fire like having someone ask what band wrote your song because they want to download it.

-And most importantly, if you get tired with it, playing more of the same is not going to get you where you want to go. Take a break for a few weeks, check out some different genres of music, and try to be open minded and you'll be improving in no time.
#13
I remember exactly when I was at that point in my playing. I remember I just stopped being able to learn anything new, and then I found the style of music that I still play to this day. As soon as I heard it, I instantly went out, bought a thumbpick, and just started hammering out the hours of practice of fingerstyle. I absorbed information like a sponge. Just take a glance at some new genre's like said above, maybe take some theory classes and such. Good luck
#14
All the suggestions sound good. I've been playing over 20 years, ruts come and go.

At about your stage in my own playing, I can remember being very dejected cause I couldn't, for all trying, play Rhandy Roads DEE properly or smoothly. I forgot all about that song for 20 years, but a week ago I saw it mentioned here in the forums and decided to give it another try. It took me about 3 hours to nail it smoothly and at double time.......

The point is, much of the time you don't even notice your own improvments, and often you'll be your own worst critique. Just stick with it.

Oh... and remember... sometimes with the really hard stuff, even the original composers can't always repeat what they managed to put down in the studio. Sometimes close does count, and then you can add the nuances over time as you improve.
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#15
Quote by GC Shred Off


If you need inspiration, there are a million places to look. Many people have made great suggestions, but the chances are you wont have the musical revelation you're hoping for. The goal is just to ease through your plateau rather than stress out about it.

So here are my suggestions:

-Learn to sing and play, if you can't already. It really makes playing that much more satisfying (and impresses a lot of people).

-Lose the pick for a while. Try playing with your fingers to bridge the gap between single note plucking and plain strumming.

-Learn a little bit of theory, but don't kill yourself trying to memorize modes and things like that. Just pick up some chord construction rules from here and there.

-Which leads into... Write some original songs. You probably wont like them (I rarely like any of my own songs), but nothing fuels the playing fire like having someone ask what band wrote your song because they want to download it.

-And most importantly, if you get tired with it, playing more of the same is not going to get you where you want to go. Take a break for a few weeks, check out some different genres of music, and try to be open minded and you'll be improving in no time.


Not to hijack, but Id like some opinions on learning to sing and play. I really think my brain is not wired to do that, as it totally hoses my timing to heck! Even with very easy songs I know the guitar parts well, and the words well....as soon as I mix words and playing both aspects crumble! Im not really sure how to practice that....
#16
Quote by GuitarDTO
Not to hijack, but Id like some opinions on learning to sing and play. I really think my brain is not wired to do that, as it totally hoses my timing to heck! Even with very easy songs I know the guitar parts well, and the words well....as soon as I mix words and playing both aspects crumble! Im not really sure how to practice that....


Start out with something stupid and simple like "Knocking on Heaven's Door" G-D-C-G-D-C. Play the chord progression for a good 3 minutes or so until you really aren't paying attention to your hands anymore and then start trying to ease into the singing.

Fail.

Try again, less time on the intro because your hands should start over right away.

Fail again.

Try again.

Fail again.

Try again.

etc.
#17
try some two chord songs like boss dj or rivers of babylon. those are the songs i started with, after you get one down its much easier to move onto another, more difficult song.
#18
Quote by GuitarDTO
Not to hijack, but Id like some opinions on learning to sing and play. I really think my brain is not wired to do that, as it totally hoses my timing to heck! Even with very easy songs I know the guitar parts well, and the words well....as soon as I mix words and playing both aspects crumble! Im not really sure how to practice that....

Don't worry, everyone thinks the exact same thing when they first give it a try. It's best to start small... Real small. For example: instead of playing on the guitar, first just try tapping your foot and singing a song you're familiar with. Once you've mastered that, try playing a really simple song by strumming straight quarter notes. Try to be fluid and steady between the chord changes and try not to strum with your singing. From there, it's just practice. It takes a good while to get comfortable with it, but it's really worth it.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Feb 26, 2009,
#19
Alrite, thanks everyone for the suggestions, but i still have one more question... Could anyone point me out to some intermediate level songs that are same genre/style like Zebra by John Butler Trio or Walkin blues (guy davis cover) and that kind of songs?

thnx again

Btw other tunnings are fine