#1
What exactly makes a Gibson SG have the sound it has? What makes is different from it than a les paul or strat?
#3
b/c of the thinner and lighter body, i believe, it has more of a trebly attack and crunch, not so much low end without being dialed in by your amp. i've used high output SDs pretty much throughout the guitar's entire lifespan (3 years now) and it's a pretty raw sounding guitar. it can sound quite good both clean and distorted, but i really love using it for that 80s hard rock sound. upper access to the higher frets is amazingly beautiful!! very nice soloing instrument.

also, b/c it has a more trebly sound than an LP, i find that the coil splitting (NOT tapping) gives it a more accurate strat sound, really noticeable through clean settings.

great guitar...i don't think i'll ever let mine go as it was my first REAL electric and i've modded it a bit so far...this thing will grow old with me!
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#4
Quote by slash_rocks2005
b/c of the thinner and lighter body, i believe, it has more of a trebly attack and crunch, not so much low end without being dialed in by your amp. i've used high output SDs pretty much throughout the guitar's entire lifespan (3 years now) and it's a pretty raw sounding guitar. it can sound quite good both clean and distorted, but i really love using it for that 80s hard rock sound. upper access to the higher frets is amazingly beautiful!! very nice soloing instrument.

also, b/c it has a more trebly sound than an LP, i find that the coil splitting (NOT tapping) gives it a more accurate strat sound, really noticeable through clean settings.

great guitar...i don't think i'll ever let mine go as it was my first REAL electric and i've modded it a bit so far...this thing will grow old with me!


what's teh difference between coil tapping and coil splitting?
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#5
^i can't quite remember, but i'm pretty sure coil tapping doesn't actually deactivate one of the coils in the humbucker- like coild SPLITTING does- so it's not really coil splitting as it is something else (which i'm sure someone who knows about it will chime in soon) that gives a somewhat different sound.

when i read up on the two, it definitely sounded like coil tapping was more of a gimmick and not as close as splitting when it comes to getting a true single coil sound. of course my guitar sounds close, but with it being mahogany with rosewood fretboard, it's still no cigar. definitely worth the $10 per push/pull pot though. i'll be doing it with the neck pup soon!!
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"They call him the 'Sand Spider.' -Why? -Probably because it sounds scary"
*Agile AL3000 Les Paul w/ Alnico IIs
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*fellow LEO feel free to give a shout out
#6
Quote by slash_rocks2005
^i can't quite remember, but i'm pretty sure coil tapping doesn't actually deactivate one of the coils in the humbucker- like coild SPLITTING does- so it's not really coil splitting as it is something else (which i'm sure someone who knows about it will chime in soon) that gives a somewhat different sound.

when i read up on the two, it definitely sounded like coil tapping was more of a gimmick and not as close as splitting when it comes to getting a true single coil sound. of course my guitar sounds close, but with it being mahogany with rosewood fretboard, it's still no cigar. definitely worth the $10 per push/pull pot though. i'll be doing it with the neck pup soon!!


i always assumed they were the same thing

guess i was wrong.
Quote by metaldud536
...I mean if indians stood naked in front of me, i couldn't tell if they're hispanic or native american. unless they put on clothes

At first he was like...
Quote by Twistedrock
I love you, man. No homo

But then, he was like...
Quote by Twistedrock
I love you even more now. Slightly homo
#7
^no, definitely NOT the same thing, but always misinterpreted as the same thing by a lot of UGers. a simple google search would explain easily .
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"They call him the 'Sand Spider.' -Why? -Probably because it sounds scary"
*Agile AL3000 Les Paul w/ Alnico IIs
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*fellow LEO feel free to give a shout out
#8
Coil splitting is shutting out one of the coils of a humbucker pickup to get a tone roughly the same as an over-wound singlecoil.
Coil tapping is a way of reducing the output of a singlecoil pickup.


As far as SGs vs everything else go, it mostly comes down to three things:
  • Thinner mahogany body. Less body mass contributes to a lighter, brighter tone than a full bodied mahogany Les Paul, but the mahogany wood species gives a deeper tone than a Stratocaster, so it's a good tonal balance between the two. The downsides to this are the thin body can end up weighing less than the guitar's neck which causes balance issues that will tire out the guitarist's arm quicker, and of course less wood in the body equals less sustain.
  • The doublecut design of the SG provides unbeatable fret access. There is simply nothing that can beat the fret access of an SG, since there is not a single fret that is bordered by the body - it's open on all sides of the neck, all the way to the last fret.
  • To make the neck access possible, the neck pickup has to be moved further back. The neck pickup on an SG is in roughly the same position as it would be on most 24 fret guitars. This gives the neck position pickup a brighter, thinner tone (almost the same as a regular middle pickup), and it also places the pickup's magnetic field in a more harmful place, which will hurt sustain. Generally this is seen as nothing but a bad thing, but it is the necessary price you pay for the great fret access.




Of course some companies now make thru-neck SGs that don't have to have the neck pickup moved back, some make SGs with thicker bodies to help the sustain and weight problem, etc etc.
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#9
wow, mrflibble, i definitely did NOT know about no. 3...that's good info to know!!

also note that in coil splitting, when activated you WILL hear a little decrease in volume as well, as should be expected with only one of the two coils activated.
My MAIN Gear
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"They call him the 'Sand Spider.' -Why? -Probably because it sounds scary"
*Agile AL3000 Les Paul w/ Alnico IIs
*Randall RM50
*Dunlop CFH
*fellow LEO feel free to give a shout out
#10
...Wow, I didn't know any of that about SG's lol. I knew about the access and everything and the loss of sustain, but I didn't know the lowering of the neck pick up down the body (or across the body whichever way your looking at it)can really harm the guitars sustain...that makes me wanna get a thru-neck sg D:
#11
So, the original SG shape came about by Gibson's perception that players wanted a lighter version of the Les Paul, and it was introduced in 1961 as the new Les Paul shape. But demand for the original body shape continued. Les Paul didn't like the new design and asked that his name be removed from it. So late in '61 the SG was finally named with the initials of Solid Guitar. Although this was agreed to, a large stock of the little plates alongside the neck had been made and Gibson kept using them through till 1963, when plain plates came along. Only the early 1961 models are truly Les Pauls.
Another reason for pickup placement is that the neck joint is weak and early prototypes were not acceptably strong. The original placing had the pole of the neck humbucker furthest from the neck on the quarter harmonic. To retain as much of the LP tone as possible, the pickup was only moved so that the neck pole is on the harmonic.
The bridge pickup is similarly positioned with one pole on a harmonic which is why it is not as near the bridge as is seen in fat Strats and the like, and gives the SG its very distinctive sound on that pickup.
One other point of interest is that the 3 pickup versions (originally always called Custom) had the neck and middle pickups wired together to work as one.
The early SG type necks in the sixties were very thin to compensate for the lighter body. Only later, when it was decreed that fatter necks were wanted, did the problem of head diving start. It is one of the mysteries of Gibsons that the strap button was placed at the neck joint instead of on the upper horn which would have partially overcome this problem.
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#12
^i think it looks better on the back of the guitar than on the horn...that's just me. i'm so used to the neck diving that it's just second nature to hold it properly.
My MAIN Gear
____________
"They call him the 'Sand Spider.' -Why? -Probably because it sounds scary"
*Agile AL3000 Les Paul w/ Alnico IIs
*Randall RM50
*Dunlop CFH
*fellow LEO feel free to give a shout out