#2
wow.... use your ear. Can you just develop a melody with random notes? Keep the one that sounds good on top of the rhythm progression.
#3
Well start by learning a couple scales. The most common first scale (and in actuality one of the most useful scales) is the minor pentatonic scale. Learn it. Love it. Once you know it like the back of your hand your going to have to learn how to key a song so you know where to play the scale. Theres tons of useful resources on this website for learning the scales and how to key a song etc but generally speaking the first chord that is played in a chord progression is what key the song is in. Good luck!
#5
Not necessarily, it's more often the last chord, but the first chord is usually right
If it's not the first chord nor the last chord you can take all chords and match it up with a key
#7
Use the chords used in the song to determine what key the song is in.
Use a scale that corresponds to the key to write your solo. If your song uses the chords Cmaj, Fmaj, and Gmaj, then it is in the key of C major and you can use the C Major scale to solo over it.

If you have know idea how to determine which key chords fall into then you need to go back and learn the major scale and how to harmonize it.
To be brave is to take action in spite of fear. It is impossible to be brave without first being afraid. To take action without fear is not brave, it is foolish.
#8
Quote by Indiemad
to key a song you take the first chord dunt ya

also finding the root note helps alot too.but thats kind of useless
#9
theres plenty of lessons and columns on how to write solos
you are what you is
#10
Quote by wholigan13
also finding the root note helps alot too.but thats kind of useless


Well for quick simple, on-the-spot improv I find the root and the 3rd, then use a pentatonic and listen to what notes are safe to go with from there.

But obviously for writing it's more complicated than that - I'd recommend to start with just recording yourself playing a simple chord pattern, and then after you know what notes and what key it is, see what kind of melodies you can make.

As Jeremoose suggested learn the minor pentatonic. So for example if you do a chord pattern of Cmaj, Amin, Gmaj, Amin, and then play about with the Amin pentatonic over it you'll have no problems.

I hope that helped I'm sorry if I was patronising but it's difficult to judge someone level of playing from a few words!
#11
Quote by Indiemad
so do i have to use notes from scale??


Do you know how to play any solos?

That's a good place to start.
#12
You need to cut your teeth before you can start thinking about writing a half decent solo (in my experience).
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#13
i can play stuff like the solo to reptillia (Strokes) but thats as good as it gets. when i write solos i cant seem to make it differ from scale. i want to add notes from outside. can i do that??? what are the rules???
#14
Quote by Indiemad
i can play stuff like the solo to reptillia (Strokes) but thats as good as it gets. when i write solos i cant seem to make it differ from scale. i want to add notes from outside. can i do that??? what are the rules???


When you learn some basic theory like note intervals, you can apply that to solos you learn along the way. Learning the basic theory will also help you understand scales, modes, choord construction and progressions. There is not an easy way to learn how to solo because it takes practice and the dedication to learn how to use your instrument.
#15
Quote by Indiemad
i can play stuff like the solo to reptillia (Strokes) but thats as good as it gets. when i write solos i cant seem to make it differ from scale. i want to add notes from outside. can i do that??? what are the rules???



there are no rules, and yes you can use whatever notes you want. Remember you are the one writing the solo, not a theory book.

Learn lots of solos. Start looking into theory so that you can better understand the music you are listening to and playing. Eventually what you learn from theory and your playing experience will come together. It takes time so be patient and enjoy the process of learning and making music.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Feb 26, 2009,