#1
This might be a dumb question since it's a guitar forum, but I can try.

I'm teaching guitar for some time now and it is going really well, my pupils are evolving pretty well and I got a fair amount of them. Now one kid saw my violin under my desk during guitarlesson and now he wants me to teach him violin!!!

So I want to try it, knowing that I need to develop a whole new way of teaching.

Somebody that can help me out a bit?

Thanks
Quote by Shea Donoghue
"WHY DON'T YOU JUST F*CK OFF?!" So I ran up to her face and went "FINE, I F*CKING WILL" and stuck my hands down my pants and started masturbating. My friends were pissing themselves laughing while she just went "JESUS CHRIST"
#2
There's definitely more to it than teaching guitar. You have to worry about hand posture and bow hold on top of the usual stuff. You already have experience teaching so you shouldn't have a problem there. As long as you're a good violinist yourself it should work out alright.
#3
How good are you at violin? Have you done any classical grades?

To be honest, it might be a good idea to point this kid in the direction of an experienced teacher because violin (as you probably know if you play it) requires very good technique to progress well so a teacher who knows exactly how to teach this technique is necessary.

However, if you do want to teach this kid then maybe get some beginner books designed for a teacher (eg. I remember when I first started I used the essential string method) then just follow it through. Also, make sure the kid knows that you are his first student and maybe charge him accordingly.
#4
If you are actually going to try and teach him violin invest in a good set of earplugs. And spend some time teaching him how to hold it properly. If you value your ears at all I'd lock the bow away and just stick to plucking for a while, til he gets the hang of where his fingers go and starts to stay reasonably in tune - it also means he can concentrate on his left hand without having to worry about bowing technique. If he struggles a lot with finger positioning get some of those coloured dot things. But don't forget the earplugs!
#6
I started out in Suzuki books, but that's 10 years aggo! And yes classically trained

And about the 'good violin player' well I am playing it for a long time but I can't say I'm a master in violin. My questions are actually:
Internetsites like ultimate guitar?
Good books?
And how to teach jazz/improvisation... that was completely self-studied so I don't really have a clue how to teach it.

Thanks, and let's hope it works and I don't waste my time (and his)
Quote by Shea Donoghue
"WHY DON'T YOU JUST F*CK OFF?!" So I ran up to her face and went "FINE, I F*CKING WILL" and stuck my hands down my pants and started masturbating. My friends were pissing themselves laughing while she just went "JESUS CHRIST"
#7
If you do use Suzuki books, make sure that you also pair it with another kind of method which doesn't teach the student to just read fingerings and not notes. The fact that there are suzuki students who can play a bach sonata/partita and not be able to effectively and musically read 'mary had a little lamb' is almost criminal.

A good way to teach improvisation in a teacher student setting is to get him or her to imitate what you do. What I mean is for you to play one short motif or phrase, and then have him/her play it back to you, and then do another short phrase and so on and so forth so that the student gets real familiar with the instrument in that fashion. After the student has become comfortable with that try making it more call and response (I think that's pretty self explanatory) so that he can ease in to the whole idea of making a musical idea within a context.